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unhappy

English

Etymology

un- +? happy

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?n?hæpi/
  • Rhymes: -æpi

Adjective

unhappy (comparative unhappier or more unhappy, superlative unhappiest or most unhappy)

  1. Not happy; sad.
    • 1728, John Gay, The Beggar's Opera
      A moment of time may make us unhappy forever.
  2. Not satisfied; unsatisfied.
    An unhappy customer is unlikely to return to your shop.
  3. (chiefly dated) Not lucky; unlucky.
    The doomed lovers must have been born under an unhappy star.
  4. (chiefly dated) Not suitable; unsuitable.
    • 1563, John Foxe, Actes and Monuments
      The people, if they are not strangely bent
      Against our welfare, never will consent
      To this unhappy match, foreboding ill:
      What's it to us, if th' adverse nation will?

Synonyms

  • (not happy): See Thesaurus:sad or Thesaurus:lamentable

Antonyms

  • happy
  • glad
  • delighted
  • exuberant
  • joyous
  • joyful

Translations

Noun

unhappy (plural unhappies)

  1. An individual who is not happy.
    • 1972, The New Yorker (volume 48, part 1, page 109)
      Leduc, as is true of many other unhappies, is largely a confessional writer: her subject is herself, and her gift is a driving, vivacious power that turns her incurable, inveterate unhappiness into a series of dramas []

Middle English

Noun

unhappy

  1. unhap

unhappy From the web:

  • what unhappy mean
  • what unhappy customers want
  • what unhappy crowds do
  • what unhappy triad
  • unhappy what to do
  • what are unhappy cranberries called
  • what does unhappy mean
  • what is unhappy marriage

unhappy in Examples From Wordnik

  • Promoted to Headline (H2) on 6/20/08: Another 'unhappy birthday' for Aung San Suu Kyi yahooBuzzArticleHeadline = 'Another \'unhappy birthday\' for Aung San Suu Kyi '; yahooBuzzArticleSummary =' Article: Remarks on Aung San Suu Kyi\'s birthday and comments on the opposition\'s activities of Burma. '
  • LESSON I spokes'man, _one who speaks for others_. cho'rus, _a number of speakers or singers_. apt, _likely; ready_. folks, _people; family_. mis'er a ble, _very unhappy; very poor_. lone'some, _without friends; lonely_. score, _twenty_. wretch'ed, _unhappy; very sad_.
  • He was never what we call unhappy, but full of inward joy, which he bequeathed to his disciples in that sublimest of all prayers, 'that they might have his joy fulfilled in themselves.'
  • In the Rabourdin bureau was a clerk who played the man of courage and audacity, professed the opinions of the Left centre, and rebelled against the tyrannies of Baudoyer as exercised upon what he called the unhappy slaves of that office.
  • "Did he report you truly, to have used the English word 'unhappy'?"
  • "Did he report you truly, to have used the English word 'unhappy'?"
  • If your child seems cranky, irritable, bossy, or just plain unhappy after eating any of the myriad foods that contain colorings, preservatives like sodium benzoate, or other additives, consider changing your shopping habits.
  • If your child seems cranky, irritable, bossy, or just plain unhappy after eating any of the myriad foods that contain colorings, preservatives like sodium benzoate, or other additives, consider changing your shopping habits.
  • SAGAL: The survey went over all these tweets, millions of them, and looked for certain unhappy keywords and then looked for the timestamp and the location.
  • The results showed that the women in unhappy relationships and the women who remained emotionally hung up on their ex-husbands had decidedly weaker immune responses than the women who were in happier relationships (or were happily out of them).


severe

English

Etymology

From Middle French, from Latin severus (severe, serious, grave in demeanor).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /s??v??/ (US) IPA(key): /s??v?r/
  • Rhymes: -??(?)

Adjective

severe (comparative severer or more severe, superlative severest or most severe)

  1. Very bad or intense.
  2. Strict or harsh.
    a severe taskmaster
  3. Sober, plain in appearance, austere.
    a severe old maiden aunt

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • (very bad or intense): mild
  • (very bad or intense): minor
  • (strict or harsh): lenient

Derived terms

  • severely (adverb)
  • severity (noun)
  • severeness (noun)

Translations

Further reading

  • severe in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • severe in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • severe at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Reeves, everse, reeves, servee

Esperanto

Adverb

severe

  1. severely

Related terms

  • severa

Italian

Adjective

severe

  1. feminine plural of severo

Latin

Verb

s?v?re

  1. third-person plural perfect active indicative of ser?

Adjective

sev?re

  1. vocative masculine singular of sev?rus

References

  • severe in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • severe in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • severe in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Serbo-Croatian

Noun

severe (Cyrillic spelling ??????)

  1. vocative singular of sever

severe From the web:

  • what severe weather
  • what severe depression feels like
  • what severe means
  • what severe anxiety feels like
  • what severe adhd looks like
  • what severe weather is in florida
  • what severe stress does to the body
  • what severe anemia feels like

severe in Examples From Wordnik

  • I opened up Firefox this evening to a severe weather alert from ForecastFox…which surprised me, given that it’s lovely weather: a bit of clouds, maybe some rain later, but nothing I’d call *severe*!
  • For example, we've estimated the distribution of a strong ground shaking because it's not always the epicenter, it's distributed along the fault, and we can estimate how much shaking actually occurred, and we estimated that close to three-fourths of a million people experienced vital to extreme shaking with very heavy damage and an additional 2 million people on top of that experienced what we term severe shaking, also expecting heavy damage.
  • The phrase "severe reality distortion field" is probably not one you bump into every day.
  • The phrase "severe reality distortion field" is probably not one you bump into every day.
  • He defended government actions, saying they are necessary to avoid what he called a severe disruption to the financial markets.
  • It's not what I call severe sickness, but he is coughing and blowing his nose.
  • They say they will work with what they call severe flaws in the plan to change them during the legislative process.
  • That means we could see 20 or more tornadoes, two of which could be what we call severe tornadoes or a very large wind event and that's one of the big things that we're concerned about today, Rob, is that duratio (ph), as we call them or a large-scale wind event that can cause miles and miles of damage.
  • Pressure for his resignation has been building since Monday, when a government commission blamed Mr. Olmert for what it called his severe failures during Israel's war against Lebanon's Hezbollah guerrillas last summer.
  • We spoke to one leader yesterday who saw Robertson's remarks and the result of it as what he called a severe blow.

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