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ungovernable

English

Etymology

un- +? governable

Adjective

ungovernable (comparative more ungovernable, superlative most ungovernable)

  1. Not governable

Translations

ungovernable From the web:

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ungovernable in Examples From Wordnik

  • The idea that this one rule permits the minority that only represents a third of the country to render the country ungovernable is simply true.
  • For a partisan such as Yglesias to say that America has become ungovernable is a rare opening of a window to his soul.
  • The idea that this one rule permits the minority that only represents a third of the country to render the country ungovernable is simply true
  • Maybe it's just me, off here in Maine, one of the remote corners the various anti-Federalists wrote about as being ungovernable from the center.
  • Maybe it's just me, off here in Maine, one of the remote corners the various anti-Federalists wrote about as being ungovernable from the center.
  • Maybe it's just me, off here in Maine, one of the remote corners the various anti-Federalists wrote about as being ungovernable from the center.
  • Maybe it's just me, off here in Maine, one of the remote corners the various anti-Federalists wrote about as being ungovernable from the center.
  • Maybe it's just me, off here in Maine, one of the remote corners the various anti-Federalists wrote about as being ungovernable from the center.
  • Maybe it's just me, off here in Maine, one of the remote corners the various anti-Federalists wrote about as being ungovernable from the center.
  • Maybe it's just me, off here in Maine, one of the remote corners the various anti-Federalists wrote about as being ungovernable from the center.


cross

English

Alternative forms

  • Cross (sometimes for the historical cross of Christ)

Etymology

From Middle English cross, cros, from Old English cros (rood, cross), from Old Norse kross (cross), perhaps from Old Irish cros (compare Welsh croes, Irish crois), from Latin crux (cruci). Cognate with Icelandic kross (cross), Faroese krossur (cross), Danish kors (cross), Swedish kors (cross). Displaced native Middle English rood (rood, cross), from Old English r?d (cross, rood, crucifix, pole); see rood.The sense of "two intersecting lines drawn or cut on a surface; two lines intersecting at right angles" without regard to religious signification develops from the late 14th century.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /k??s/, (especially formerly) /k???s/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /k??s/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada) IPA(key): /k??s/
  • Rhymes: -?s, -??s

Noun

cross (plural crosses)

  1. A geometrical figure consisting of two straight lines or bars intersecting each other such that at least one of them is bisected by the other.
  2. (heraldry) Any geometric figure having this or a similar shape, such as a cross of Lorraine or a Maltese cross.
  3. A wooden post with a perpendicular beam attached and used (especially in the Roman Empire) to execute criminals (by crucifixion).
  4. (usually with the) The cross on which Christ was crucified.
  5. (Christianity) A hand gesture made in imitation of the shape of the Cross.
  6. (Christianity) A modified representation of the crucifixion stake, worn as jewellery or displayed as a symbol of religious devotion.
  7. (figurative, from Christ's bearing of the cross) A difficult situation that must be endured.
    • 1641, Ben Jonson, Timber
      Heaven prepares good men with crosses.
  8. The act of going across; the act of passing from one side to the other
  9. (biology) An animal or plant produced by crossbreeding or cross-fertilization.
  10. (by extension) A hybrid of any kind.
    • 1856, Lord Dufferin, Letters from High Latitudes
      Toning down the ancient Viking into a sort of a cross between Paul Jones and Jeremy Diddler
  11. (boxing) A hook thrown over the opponent's punch.
  12. (soccer) A pass in which the ball travels from by one touchline across the pitch.
  13. A place where roads intersect and lead off in four directions; a crossroad (common in UK and Irish place names such as Gerrards Cross).
  14. A monument that marks such a place. (Also common in UK or Irish place names such as Charing Cross)
  15. (obsolete) A coin stamped with the figure of a cross, or that side of such a piece on which the cross is stamped; hence, money in general.
  16. (obsolete, Ireland) Church lands.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sir J. Davies to this entry?)
  17. A line drawn across or through another line.
  18. (surveying) An instrument for laying of offsets perpendicular to the main course.
  19. A pipe-fitting with four branches whose axes usually form a right angle.
  20. (Rubik's Cube) Four edge cubies of one side that are in their right places, forming the shape of a cross.
  21. (cartomancy) The thirty-sixth Lenormand card.
  22. (slang) crossfire.

Synonyms

  • (production of cross-breeding or -fertilization): hybrid
  • (cross on which Christ was crucified): True Cross

Derived terms

Descendants

  • ? Japanese: ??? (kurosu)

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

cross (comparative crosser, superlative crossest)

  1. Transverse; lying across the main direction.
    At the end of each row were cross benches which linked the rows.
    • the cross refraction of the second prism
  2. (archaic) Opposite, opposed to.
    His actions were perversely cross to his own happiness.
  3. (now rare) Opposing, adverse; being contrary to what one would hope or wish for.
    • , New York Review of Books, 2001, p.50:
      As a fat body is more subject to diseases, so are rich men to absurdities and fooleries, to many casualties and cross inconveniences.
    • c. 1650, Jeremy Taylor, Of Contentedness
      a cross fortune
    • 1665, Joseph Glanvill, Scepsis Scientifica
      the cross and unlucky issue of my designs
    • 1694, Robert South, Christianity Mysterious, and the Wisdom of God in Making it So (sermon preached at Westminster Abbey on April 29, 1694)
      The article of the resurrection seems to lie marvellously cross to the common experience of mankind.
  4. Bad-tempered, angry, annoyed.
    She was rather cross about missing her train on the first day of the job.
    Please don't get cross at me. (or) Please don't get cross with me.
    • 1650/1651, Jeremy Taylor, The Rule and Exercises of Holy Living
      He had received a cross answer from his mistress.
  5. Made in an opposite direction, or an inverse relation; mutually inverse; interchanged.
    cross interrogatories
    cross marriages, as when a brother and sister marry persons standing in the same relation to each other

Synonyms

  • (opposite to): contrarily, opposed, reverse, antipodal
  • (mildly angry): angry, annoyed, irritated

Derived terms

Translations

Preposition

cross

  1. (archaic) across
  2. cross product of the previous vector and the following vector.

Related terms

  • dot
  • × (the multiplication sign)

Translations

Verb

cross (third-person singular simple present crosses, present participle crossing, simple past and past participle crossed)

  1. To make or form a cross.
    1. To place across or athwart; to cause to intersect.
    2. To lay or draw something across, such as a line.
    3. To mark with an X.
    4. To write lines of text at right angles to and over the top of one another in order to save paper.W
      • An indulgent playmate, Grannie would lay aside the long scratchy-looking letter she was writing (heavily crossed ‘to save notepaper’) and enter into the delightful pastime of ‘a chicken from Mr Whiteley's’.
    5. (reflexive, to cross oneself) To make the sign of the cross over oneself.
    6. (transitive) To make the sign of the cross over (something or someone).
  2. To move relatively.
    1. (transitive) To go from one side of (something) to the other.
    2. (intransitive) To travel in a direction or path that will intersect with that of another.
    3. (transitive) To pass, as objects going in an opposite direction at the same time.
      • November 4, 1866, James David Forbes, letter to E. C. Batten Esq.
        Your kind letter crossed mine.
    4. (sports) Relative movement by a player or of players.
      1. (cricket, reciprocally) Of both batsmen, to pass each other when running between the wickets in order to score runs.
      2. (soccer) To pass the ball from one side of the pitch to the other side.
      3. (rugby) To score a try.
  3. (social) To oppose.
    1. (transitive) To contradict (another) or frustrate the plans of.
    2. (transitive, obsolete) To interfere and cut off ; to debar.
    3. (law) To conduct a cross examination; to question a hostile witness.
  4. (biology) To cross-fertilize or crossbreed.
  5. (transitive) To stamp or mark (a cheque) in such a way as to prevent it being cashed, thus requiring it to be deposited into a bank account.
    • 1924, Commerce Reports (volume 1, issue 13, page 849)
      The English practice of crossing checks so that payment may be made to the bank account or to order is prevalent.

Synonyms

  • (to cross-fertilize or crossbreed): cross-fertilize, crossbreed

Hyponyms

  • crisscross

Derived terms

  • becross
  • crossing
  • crossover
  • crossword

Related terms

Translations


French

Etymology

From English.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /k??s/

Noun

cross m (uncountable)

  1. (sports) cross-country

Further reading

  • “cross” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From English.

Noun

cross m (invariable)

  1. motocross
  2. cross (boxing punch, tennis shot)
  3. slice (golf shot)

Derived terms

  • crossista

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • cros, croz, crosse, crosce

Etymology

From Old English cros, borrowed from Old Norse kross, borrowed from Old Irish cros, borrowed from Latin crux.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kr?s/

Noun

cross (plural crosses)

  1. the Holy Cross; Christ's cross.
  2. A representation of the cross of Christ; the cross as a Christian symbol, including:
    1. The sign of the cross.
    2. A crucifix or crosier.
    3. (figuratively) The cross in Christian metaphors, such as:
      1. crucifixion
      2. suffering, penury
      3. (biblical) Christianity
  3. The cross as a symbol elsewhere, for example:
    1. The intersection of drawn lines, especially as a signature.
    2. (heraldry) A heraldic cross
  4. gallows, gibbet

Descendants

  • English: cross
    • ? Japanese: ??? (kurosu)
  • Scots: cross, cros
  • Yola: cress

References

  • “cros, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-03.

cross From the web:

  • what crosses over in meiosis
  • what crosses the blood brain barrier
  • what cross platform games are there
  • what cross country skis to buy
  • what crossword
  • what crossover frequency for subwoofer
  • what crosses the placenta
  • what crossing over in biology

cross in Examples From Wordnik

  • However, I love seeing the simple 'garden spider' / 'cross spider', the one that weaves beautiful webs in my garden and has a white cross pattern on its back.
  • What makes you think anything about the cross dressing in 'cross and single speed MTB is ironic?
  • If we ask what the question is that the passage overall poses, or what the change is that needs to be taking place over the time of the passage's narration, it is about the move from desolation in the face of the cross (Jesus 'cross and the implicit demand for the disciple to carry the cross also) to confidence that the process is the work of love coming from and leading to the Father.
  • In fact, what came out in cross examination, through Mark Geragos 'cross examination, is that there were at least 243 different locations throughout the bay that were being searched by those divers.
  • It crept onwards towards the station of the cross, but -- _it never reached the cross_.
  • II. ii.157 (47,6) [For I am that way going to temptation, Where prayers cross] Which way Angelo is going to temptation, we begin to perceive; but how _prayers cross_ that way, or cross each other, at that way, more than any other, I do not understand.
  • World Cup soccer teams in terrorists 'cross hairs AL Qaeda has put the American and British soccer teams directly in its cross hairs, circulating word online that the athletes are prime targets for an attack at the World Cup Games in South Africa in June, FOXNews. com reports.
  • World Cup soccer teams in terrorists 'cross hairs AL Qaeda has put the American and British soccer teams directly in its cross hairs, circulating word online that the athletes are prime targets for an attack at the World Cup Games in South Africa in June, FOXNews. com reports.
  • World Cup soccer teams in terrorists 'cross hairs AL Qaeda has put the American and British soccer teams directly in its cross hairs, circulating word online that the athletes are prime targets for an attack at the World Cup Games in South Africa in June, FOXNews. com reports.
  • World Cup soccer teams in terrorists 'cross hairs AL Qaeda has put the American and British soccer teams directly in its cross hairs, circulating word online that the athletes are prime targets for an attack at the World Cup Games in South Africa in June, FOXNews. com reports.

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