free hit counter

different between sure vs incontrovertible

sure

English

Alternative forms

  • sho
  • sho'

Etymology

From Middle English sure, seur, sur, from Middle French sur or Old French seür, from Latin s?c?rus (secure, literally carefree), from s?- (apart) + c?ra (care) (compare Old English orsorg (carefree), from or- (without) + sorg (care)). See cure. Doublet of secure and the now obsolete or dialectal sicker (certain, safe).

Displaced native Middle English wis, iwis (certain, sure) (from Old English ?ewis, ?ewiss (certain, sure)), Middle English siker (sure, secure) (from Old English sicor (secure, sure)) with which was cognate.

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /???/, /???/, /???/
  • Rhymes: -??(r), -??(r)
  • (General Australian, General New Zealand) IPA(key): /?o?/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /???/, /???/, /??/
  • (Canada) IPA(key): /???/, /??/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /sj???/, /sju??/, /s????/
  • Homophones: shaw, Shaw (in non-rhotic dialects with the horse-hoarse merger), shore (with the cure-force merger), show (in non-rhotic with the dough-door merger)

Adjective

sure (comparative surer, superlative surest)

  1. Physically secure and certain, non-failing, reliable.
  2. Certain in one's knowledge or belief.
    She is sure of herself.
    He was sure of being a finalist.
    They weren't sure who would attend.
    You seemed sure that the car was his.
  3. (followed by a to infinitive) Certain to act or be a specified way.
  4. (obsolete) Free from danger; safe; secure.
  5. (obsolete) Betrothed; engaged to marry.
    • c. 1513-1518 (probably date written, published after 1535) Thomas More, History of King Richard III
      The king was sure to Dame Elizabeth Lucy, and her husband before God.
    • 1632, Richard Brome, The Northern Lass
      I presum'd [] [that] you had been sure, as fast as faith could bind you, man and wife.

Synonyms

  • (secure and steadfast): certain, failsafe, reliable, sicker
  • (steadfast in one's knowledge or belief): certain, positive, wis

Derived terms

  • for sure
  • sure as hell
  • surely
  • sure up

Pages starting with “sure”.

Descendants

  • ?? Irish: siúráil
  • ? Welsh: siwr

Translations

Adverb

sure (comparative more sure, superlative most sure)

  1. (modal adverb) Without doubt, certainly.
    Sure he's coming! Why wouldn't he?
    "Did you kill that bear yourself?" ?"I sure did!"
    • 1802, Charles Lamb, John Woodvil
      These high and gusty relishes of life, sure,
      Have no allayings of mortality in them.

Usage notes

  • Often proscribed in favor of surely. May be informal.

Interjection

sure

  1. Yes, expressing noncommittal agreement or consent.
  2. Yes; of course.
  3. You're welcome; polite response to being thanked.

Synonyms

  • (noncommittal yes): OK, yes

Translations

References

  • 1996, T.F. Hoad, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Etymology, Oxford University Press, ?ISBN

Anagrams

  • ERUs, Ersu, Reus, Rues, Ruse, US'er, rues, ruse, suer, ures, user

Danish

Adjective

sure

  1. inflection of sur:
    1. definite singular
    2. plural

Finnish

Verb

sure

  1. Indicative present connegative form of surra.
  2. Second-person singular imperative present form of surra.
  3. Second-person singular imperative present connegative form of surra.

Anagrams

  • resu, seur.

French

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -y?

Adjective

sure

  1. feminine singular of sur

Adjective

sure

  1. Alternative spelling of sûre

Anagrams

  • rues
  • ruse, rusé
  • suer
  • user

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old French seür, from Latin s?c?rus. Doublet of siker.

Alternative forms

  • sur, seur, seure, sewre, sewr, sewere, suer, suere, soure, suir, sere, sore

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /s?u?r/, /siu?r/, /su?r/

Adjective

sure (comparative seurer)

  1. safe, protected (not dangerous or harmful)
  2. fortified, well-defended, protected; especially religiously
  3. sure, certain, confirmed
  4. sure-minded (certain of one's intent)
  5. reliable, of good quality
  6. sound, sturdy, hardy
Derived terms
  • surely
  • surement
  • suren
  • surenes
  • surete
Descendants
  • English: sure
    • ?? Irish: siúráil
    • ? Welsh: siwr
  • Scots: shuir
References
  • “seur, adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-21.

Adverb

sure

  1. sure, surely, with no doubt or uncertainty
  2. entirely, wholly, fully
  3. While protecting something, with protection
  4. With a tight grasp or grip
Descendants
  • English: sure
  • Scots: shuir
References
  • “seur, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-21.

Etymology 2

Verb

sure

  1. Alternative form of suren

Etymology 3

Noun

sure

  1. Alternative form of sire

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Arabic ??????? (s?ra, chapter of the Qur'an).

Alternative forms

  • sura

Noun

sure m (definite singular suren, indefinite plural surer, definite plural surene)

  1. (Islam) a sura (any of the 114 chapters of the Qur'an)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Adjective

sure

  1. definite singular of sur
  2. plural of sur

References

  • “sure” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “sure” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Anagrams

  • ruse, suer, ures

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Arabic ??????? (s?ra, chapter of the Qur'an).

Alternative forms

  • sura

Noun

sure m (definite singular suren, indefinite plural surar, definite plural surane)

  1. (Islam) a sura (any of the 114 chapters of the Qur'an)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Adjective

sure

  1. definite singular of sur
  2. plural of sur

References

  • “sure” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • ruse, suer

Old English

Etymology

From Germanic, related to s?r (sour).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?su?.re/

Noun

s?re f

  1. sorrel

Pali

Alternative forms

Noun

sure

  1. vocative singular of sur? (a class of liquor)

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?sure/

Adjective

sure

  1. inflection of sur:
    1. genitive/dative feminine singular
    2. nominative/accusative/genitive/dative feminine/neuter plural

Swedish

Adjective

sure

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of sur.

Turkish

Etymology

From Arabic ??????? (s?ra).

Noun

sure (definite accusative sureyi, plural sureler)

  1. sura

Declension

sure From the web:

  • what sure means
  • what surety bond means
  • what sure thing means
  • what surety means
  • what sure your blood sugar be
  • what surety bond
  • what sure your blood pressure be
  • what sure your heart rate be

sure in Examples From Wordnik

  • The problem with most "act now, just in case" demands and figuring that the "just in case" is considered a lie to suck in the skeptics... there is no "in case" because it's a sure thing is that the changes either won't do what they supposedly are supposed to do or would actually make it worse *and* that every "solution" invariably will cause *for sure* harm to economies and real people will suffer.
  • I'm not sure that the two gents, hot as they are, qualify as "younger" but it seems the "hipster" part is covered by the Loverboy t-shirt, worn, I'm *sure*, in a "Hahahaha, they're so bad, they're good" kind of ironic way.
  • Is yet one more reason beyond what I blogged why I am just not so sure even good enough moms like me will be *for sure* going to Heaven.
  • "I warn't sure, sir," faltered Nance, whose honor had outweighed her longing for money and the comfort it would bring, and had brought her through the long city to seek the rightful owner of the thimble -- "I warn't _sure_; but I knew her name, for herself an 'a gennelman came onst to see mother long ago."
  • Work your way up during these five years into Mr. Van Ostend's confidence, and I am sure, _sure_, that by that time he will have something for you that will satisfy even your young ambition.
  • "I'm sure he will, little sweetheart I'm _sure_ he will."
  • "You are sure he is married, Sara, -- _quite sure_?"
  • Even now, I can't be sure you love me -- not _sure!
  • _ That's the word I found to say it; she's sure -- sure -- _sure!
  • "Father Davy, are you sure, _sure_?" begged his daughter.


incontrovertible

English

Etymology

in- +? controvertible

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /???.k?n.t???v??.t?bl?/

Adjective

incontrovertible (comparative more incontrovertible, superlative most incontrovertible)

  1. Not capable of being denied, challenged, or disputed; closed to questioning.
    Synonyms: indisputable, undeniable, unquestionable
    Antonym: controvertible

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


Spanish

Etymology

From in- +? controvertible.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /inkont?obe??tible/, [??.kõn?.t??o.??e??t?i.??le]

Adjective

incontrovertible (plural incontrovertibles)

  1. undisputable

incontrovertible From the web:

  • incontrovertible meaning
  • incontrovertible what does it mean
  • what do incontrovertible mean
  • what does incontrovertible mean in science
  • what does incontrovertible mean in vocabulary
  • what does incontrovertible fact mean
  • what is incontrovertible benefit
  • what does incontrovertible refer to

incontrovertible in Examples From Wordnik

  • On the plus side, Mr. Bloomberg said he is most proud of what he called the "incontrovertible evidence" that public schools improved during his tenure.
  • Why is there so much passion about global warming, and why has the issue become so vexing that the American Physical Society, from which Dr. Giaever resigned a few months ago, refused the seemingly reasonable request by many of its members to remove the word "incontrovertible" from its description of a scientific issue?
  • If theres ever been a time to use the word incontrovertible, its when were talking about evolution.
  • If theres ever been a time to use the word incontrovertible, its when were talking about evolution.
  • Brian has various pieces of evidence for this, but the most incontrovertible is that the review says at one point Clegg offers tips on how to prepare a worm sandwich.
  • Brian has various pieces of evidence for this, but the most incontrovertible is that the review says at one point Clegg offers tips on how to prepare a worm sandwich.
  • Brian has various pieces of evidence for this, but the most incontrovertible is that the review says at one point Clegg offers tips on how to prepare a worm sandwich.
  • Recognizing this responsibility, and assuming that at these periodical gatherings you have no time to bother with theories and abstractions, I intend to confine myself to facts-plain incontrovertible facts-or to statements based on actual experiences.
  • OBAMA: I made a very narrow statement that I think is incontrovertible, which is if we've got a actionable intelligence then uh .... that there are high value Al Qaeda targets, that we should take them out.
  • OBAMA: I made a very narrow statement that I think is incontrovertible, which is if we've got a actionable intelligence then uh .... that there are high value Al Qaeda targets, that we should take them out.

you may also like

+1
Share
Pin
Like
Send
Share