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different between substance vs nucleus

substance

English

Alternative forms

  • substaunce (archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English substance, from Old French substance, from Latin substantia (substance, essence), from subst?ns, present active participle of subst? (exist, literally stand under), from sub + st? (stand).

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /?s?bst?ns/, [?s?bst?nts]

Noun

substance (countable and uncountable, plural substances)

  1. Physical matter; material.
    • 1699, William Temple, Heads designed for an essay on conversations
      Study gives strength to the mind; conversation, grace: the first apt to give stiffness, the other suppleness: one gives substance and form to the statue, the other polishes it.
    Synonyms: matter, stuff
  2. The essential part of anything; the most vital part.
    • Heroic virtue did his actions guide, / And he the substance, not the appearance, chose.
    • 1684-1690, Thomas Burnet, Sacred Theory of the Earth
      This edition is the same in substance with the Latin.
    • 1796, Edmund Burke, Letters on a Regicide Peace
      It is insolent in words, in manner; but in substance it is not only insulting, but alarming.
    Synonyms: crux, gist
  3. Substantiality; solidity; firmness.
  4. Material possessions; estate; property; resources.
    • And there wasted his substance with riotous living.
  5. A form of matter that has constant chemical composition and characteristic properties.
  6. Drugs (illegal narcotics)
    Synonyms: dope, gear
  7. (theology) Hypostasis.

Synonyms

  • (physical matter): See also Thesaurus:substance
  • (essential part of anything): See also Thesaurus:gist
  • (drugs): See also Thesaurus:recreational drug

Related terms

Translations

Verb

substance (third-person singular simple present substances, present participle substancing, simple past and past participle substanced)

  1. (rare, transitive) To give substance to; to make real or substantial.

See also

  • style

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin substantia (substance, essence), from subst?ns, present active participle of subst? (exist, literally stand under), from sub + st? (stand).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /syp.st??s/
  • Rhymes: -??s

Noun

substance f (plural substances)

  1. substance

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “substance” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • cubassent

Middle English

Etymology

From Old French substance.

Noun

substance

  1. essence

Descendants

  • English: substance

Old French

Alternative forms

  • sostance, sustance

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin substantia.

Noun

substance f (oblique plural substances, nominative singular substance, nominative plural substances)

  1. most essential; substantial part
  2. existence

Related terms

  • substantiel

Descendants

substance From the web:

  • what substances make up an iron pot
  • what substances make up pizza
  • what substances are produced by cellular respiration
  • what substance is analogous to a factory manager
  • what substances will dissolve in water
  • what substance was the first photograph made from
  • what substances are produced during photosynthesis
  • what substance is a compound

substance in Examples From Wordnik

  • Between cells there is a greater or less amount of a homogeneous substance -- the _intercellular substance_.
  • _, (1) That the Deity created the substance of these shapes and forms from _Nothing_; or else (2) that he created them out of _his own substance_ -- out of Himself, in fact.
  • It frequently happens that the contortions or displacements due to motion are seen to affect a single line belonging to a particular substance, while the other lines of _that same substance_ remain imperturbable.
  • Beneath the endless diversity of the universe, of existence and action, there must be a principle of unity; below all fleeting appearances there must be a permanent substance; beyond this everlasting flow and change, this beginning and ending of finite existence, there must be an _eternal being_, the source and cause of all we see and know, _What is that principle of unity, that permanent substance_, or principle, or being?
  • They prove, too, that this is not merely true with one substance, as water, but generally with all electrolytic bodies; and, further, that the results obtained with any _one substance_ do not merely agree amongst themselves, but also with those obtained from _other substances_, the whole combining together into _one series of definite electro-chemical actions_ (505.).
  • And for precisely the same reason, when we find another class of properties and powers existing in certain beings, which are totally different from those belonging to mere material substances, -- incapable not only of being identified with them, but also of being accounted for by means of them, -- we are equally warranted in ascribing these properties to a _substance_, and in affirming that this substance, of which we know nothing except through its properties, is radically different from "matter."
  • It has been said by our opponents, that if we found merely on the acknowledged difference between two sets of properties or phenomena, while we admit that the substance or substratum is in itself entirely unknown to us, or known only through the medium of the properties to which we refer, -- then the dispute becomes a purely _verbal_ one, and can amount to nothing more than this, whether a _substance_ of whose essence we are entirely ignorant should be called by the name of "matter" or by the name of
  • a finer substance, and our body is rebuilt and fashioned from the indestructible _substance_ of the Universe.
  • Lab Rat tagged me with the "blogging with substance" meme, which I think constitutes a tagging FAIL since I would hesitate to use the term substance as a ...
  • Lab Rat tagged me with the "blogging with substance" meme, which I think constitutes a tagging FAIL since I would hesitate to use the term substance as a ...


nucleus

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin nucleus (kernel, core), a diminutive of nux (nut). The earliest uses refer to the head of a comet and the kernel of a seed, both recorded in Lexicon Technicum in 1704. The sense in atomic physics was coined by English scientist Michael Faraday in 1844 in a theoretical meaning.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?nju?.kli.?s/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /?nu?kli.?s/

Noun

nucleus (plural nuclei or nucleuses)

  1. The core, central part of something, around which other elements are assembled.
  2. An initial part or version that will receive additions.
    This collection will form the nucleus of a new library.
  3. (chemistry, physics) The massive, positively charged central part of an atom, made up of protons and neutrons.
  4. (cytology) A large membrane-enclosed organelle found in eukaryotic cells which contains genetic material.
  5. (neuroanatomy) A ganglion, cluster of many neuronal bodies where synapsing occurs.
  6. (phonetics, phonology) The central part of a syllable, most commonly a vowel.
    Coordinate terms: onset, coda

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • nucules, unclues

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin n?cleus (kernel, core), diminutive of nux (nut).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?nykle?j?s/

Noun

nucleus m (plural nucleussen or nuclei, diminutive nucleusje n)

  1. nucleus, core

Synonyms

  • kern

Related terms

  • nucleair
  • nucleïne
  • nucleon

Latin

Alternative forms

  • nuculeus

Etymology

A diminutive of nux (nut).

Pronunciation

n?cleus
  • (Classical) IPA(key): /?nu.kle.us/, [?n?k??e?s?]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /?nu.kle.us/, [?nu?kl?us]
n?cleus
  • (Classical) IPA(key): /?nu?.kle.us/, [?nu?k??e?s?]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /?nu.kle.us/, [?nu?kl?us]

Noun

n??cleus m (genitive n??cle?); second declension

  1. (literally) (small) nut
  2. kernel
  3. (figuratively) core
  4. nucleus

Declension

Second-declension noun.

Derived terms

  • n??cle?ris (New Latin)
  • n??cle?tus (New Latin)
  • n??cle?

Descendants

References

  • n??cl?us (n?c?l?us) in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • n?cl?us in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 1,043/1
  • nucleus” on page 1,199 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)

nucleus From the web:

  • what nucleus do
  • what nucleus function
  • what nucleus does
  • what nucleus mean
  • what nucleus is the final product
  • what nucleus made of
  • what nucleus synthesizes oxytocin
  • what nucleus contains

nucleus in Examples From Wordnik

  • The remains of the egg nucleus, after having discharged the polar cells, form the _female nucleus_ (Fig. 40, _fn_).
  • In my scenario, translation outside the nucleus is an added feature and normal translation and transcription in the nucleus can stillgo on during the gradual evolution of the transport system. hrun: The mainstay of darwinian evolution is a gradualistic concept and I have not observed that is replaced by goal-oritented approaches.
  • In my scenario, translation outside the nucleus is an added feature and normal translation and transcription in the nucleus can stillgo on during the gradual evolution of the transport system.
  • "It is going to be what they call a nucleus," said Olive, showing a little piece of fancy work.
  • We had to get what we called our nucleus registration database into a bullet-proof position so we knew we could manage intelligence and entitlements without leaving the consumer sort of left holding the bag where we make mistakes.
  • Four starters and most of the key reserves will be back next season (barring any transfers), and the nucleus is freshmen and sophomores.
  • With Pro Bowl tackle Joe Thomas and guard Eric Steinbach holding down the left side and center Alex Mack arriving via the draft in the first round, a solid nucleus is in place.
  • Although all atoms possess this latent energy, radioactive substances such as uraniumpossess heavy and unstable nucleimaking them easier to manipulate into a chain reaction whereby a heavy nucleus is split into two lighter particles which in turn go off and strike other uranium atoms splitting those.
  • I think our nucleus is starting to feel comfortable around them as well. ''
  • "Our results," as they both argued, "seem so far to indicate that the hydrogen nucleus is a more common constituent of the lighter atoms than one has hitherto been inclined to believe."

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