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different between slump vs stir

slump

English

Etymology

Probably of North Germanic origin: compare Danish slumpe (to stumble upon by chance), Norwegian slumpe (happen by chance), Swedish slumpa (to sell off). Compare also German schlumpen (to trail; draggle; be sloppy).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sl?mp/
  • Rhymes: -?mp

Verb

slump (third-person singular simple present slumps, present participle slumping, simple past and past participle slumped)

  1. (intransitive) To collapse heavily or helplessly.
    • “Heavens!” exclaimed Nina, “the blue-stocking and the fogy!—and yours are pale blue, Eileen!—you’re about as self-conscious as Drina—slumping there with your hair tumbling à la Mérode! Oh, it's very picturesque, of course, but a straight spine and good grooming is better. []
  2. (intransitive) To decline or fall off in activity or performance.
  3. (intransitive) To slouch or droop.
  4. (transitive) To lump; to throw together messily.
    • These different groups [] are exclusively slumped together under that sense.
  5. To fall or sink suddenly through or in, when walking on a surface, as on thawing snow or ice, a bog, etc.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, The Danger and Mischief of Delaying Repentance (sermon)
      The latter walk on a bottomless quag, into which unawares they may slump.
  6. (slang) (transitive) To cause to collapse; to hit hard; to render unsconscious; to kill.

Translations

Noun

slump (plural slumps)

  1. A heavy or helpless collapse; a slouching or drooping posture; a period of poor activity or performance, especially an extended period.
    1. (slang by extension) A period when a person goes without the expected amount of sex or dating.
      • 2004, Jonathan Tolins, The Last Sunday in June
        TOM. We haven't had sex with each other in five months.
        MICHAEL. We're in a slump, I know that."
  2. A measure of the fluidity of freshly mixed concrete, based on how much the concrete formed in a standard slump cone sags when the cone is removed.
  3. (Britain, dialect) A boggy place.
  4. (Scotland) The noise made by anything falling into a hole, or into a soft, miry place.
  5. (Scotland) The gross amount; the mass; the lump.

Derived terms

  • slumplike

Translations

Anagrams

  • Plums, lumps, plums

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From the verb slumpa.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sl?mp/

Noun

slump m (definite singular slumpen, indefinite plural slumpar, definite plural slumpane)

  1. random event, chance, happenstance
    Eg valde han ut på slump.
    I picked it randomly.
  2. a good amount, quite a bit
    Eg vann ein god slump pengar i går.
    I won quite a bit of money yesterday.

Verb

slump

  1. imperative of slumpa

Further reading

  • “slump” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Noun

slump m (plural slumps)

  1. slump (decline)

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

slump c

  1. chance, happenstance

Declension

Derived terms

  • slumpartikel

Related terms

  • slumpvariabel
  • slumpa

slump From the web:

  • what slump means
  • what slump concrete for driveway
  • what slump for driveway
  • what slump for concrete walls
  • what slump should i use
  • what slump concrete for slab
  • what slump to pour concrete slab
  • what slump concrete for footings

slump in Examples From Wordnik

  • Yet, for all its simplicity, the insight that a slump is about an excess demand for money makes nonsense of the whole hangover theory.
  • Yet, for all its simplicity, the insight that a slump is about an excess demand for money makes nonsense of the whole hangover theory.
  • Kidd said the slump is a little frustrating because he feels he is getting good looks and taking good shots but the ball isn't going in.
  • If they lose that incentive there might be a short term slump as inventories are drawn down.
  • London, said the global financial crisis had also resulted in falling expenditure, lack of credit and rising unemployment causing what it described as a slump in confidence and demand in the travel and tourism industry.
  • One reason securitization remains in a slump is because private bond investors remain wary after getting burned on CDOs and because of the dispute with banks over allegedly faulty underwriting standards during the mortgage boom.
  • One reason securitization remains in a slump is because private bond investors remain wary after getting burned on CDOs and because of the dispute with banks over allegedly faulty underwriting standards during the mortgage boom.
  • A recent story about how the car sales slump is affecting Japanese automakers had different mileage figures.
  • Sentiment in the financial community in Germany drops again as a slump is expected, reports Commerzbank.
  • But Williams, mired in a shooting slump from the field, then made his two free throws as the Cavs, who are a league-best 33-4 at home, finally put away the Bucks.


stir

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /st??/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /st?/
  • Rhymes: -??(?)

Etymology 1

From Middle English stiren, sturien, from Old English styrian (to be in motion, move, agitate, stir, disturb, trouble), from Proto-Germanic *sturiz (turmoil, noise, confusion), related to Proto-Germanic *staurijan? (to destroy, disturb). Cognate with Old Norse styrr (turmoil, noise, confusion), German stören (to disturb), Dutch storen (to disturb).

Verb

stir (third-person singular simple present stirs, present participle stirring, simple past and past participle stirred)

  1. (transitive) To incite to action
    Synonyms: arouse, instigate, prompt, excite; see also Thesaurus:incite
  2. (transitive) To disturb the relative position of the particles of, a liquid of suchlike, by passing something through it
    Synonym: agitate
  3. (transitive) To agitate the content of (a container), by passing something through it.
  4. (transitive) To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
  5. (transitive, dated) To change the place of in any manner; to move.
  6. (intransitive) To move; to change one’s position.
  7. (intransitive) To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or busy oneself.
  8. (intransitive) To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
  9. (intransitive, poetic) To rise, or be up and about, in the morning.
    Synonyms: arise, get up, rouse; see also Thesaurus:wake
    • “Mid-Lent, and the Enemy grins,” remarked Selwyn as he started for church with Nina and the children. Austin, knee-deep in a dozen Sunday supplements, refused to stir; poor little Eileen was now convalescent from grippe, but still unsteady on her legs; her maid had taken the grippe, and now moaned all day: “Mon dieu! Mon dieu! Che fais mourir!

For more quotations using this term, see Citations:stir.

Usage notes
  • In all transitive senses except the dated one (“to change the place of in any manner”), stir is often followed by up with an intensive effect; as, to stir up fire; to stir up sedition.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

stir (countable and uncountable, plural stirs)

  1. The act or result of stirring (moving around the particles of a liquid etc.)
  2. agitation; tumult; bustle; noise or various movements.
    • 1668, John Denham, Of Prudence (poem).
      Why all these words, this clamour, and this stir?
    • .
      Consider, after so much stir about genus and species, how few words we have yet settled definitions of.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:stir.
  3. Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder; seditious uproar.
    • 1612, Sir John Davies, Discoverie of the True Causes why Ireland was never entirely subdued
      Being advertised of some stirs raised by his unnatural sons in England.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:stir.
  4. Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.

Derived terms

  • cause a stir
  • stirless
  • upstir
Translations

Etymology 2

From Romani stariben (prison), nominalisation of (a)star (seize), causative of ast (remain), probably from Sanskrit ???????? (?ti??hati, stand or remain by), from ??????? (ti??hati, stand).

Noun

stir (countable and uncountable, plural stirs)

  1. (slang) Jail; prison.
    • 1928, Jack Callahan, Man's Grim Justice: My Life Outside the Law (page 42)
      Sing Sing was a tough joint in those days, one of the five worst stirs in the United States.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He'd never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn't run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn't swear he knew his face.
Derived terms
  • stir-crazy

Anagrams

  • ISTR, RTIs, Rist, TRIS, TRIs, Tris, rits, sirt, tris, tris-

Danish

Verb

stir

  1. imperative of stirre

stir From the web:

  • what stirred the sans-culottes to riot
  • what stores are open today
  • what stirs your soul
  • what stirring means
  • what stirred the sans-culottes to riot quizlet
  • what stores are open near me
  • what stirpes means
  • what stir fry sauce

stir in Examples From Wordnik

  • Put the sugar, water and glucose over the fire; stir till the sugar is dissolved; wash down the sides of the saucepan with a cloth or the fingers dipped in cold water, cover and let boil three or four minutes, then uncover and let cook to 275° F. (when a little is cooled and chewed it clings but does not stick to the teeth) add the butter and peanuts and _stir constantly_ until the peanuts are nicely browned (or are of the color of well roasted peanuts).
  • "During the call, he expressed surprise that his comments had created what he called a stir," the official told AFP on condition of anonymity.
  • "During the call, he expressed surprise that his comments had created what he called a stir," the official said.
  • "During the call, he expressed surprise that his comments had created what he called a stir," the official said.
  • "During the call, he expressed surprise that his comments had created what he called a stir," the official said.
  • "During the call, he expressed surprise that his comments had created what he called a stir," the official said.
  • "During the call, he expressed surprise that his comments had created what he called a stir," the official said.
  • "During the call, he expressed surprise that his comments had created what he called a stir," the official said.
  • "During the call, he expressed surprise that his comments had created what he called a stir," the official said.
  • "During the call, he expressed surprise that his comments had created what he called a stir," the official said.

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