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slow

English

Etymology

From Middle English slow, slaw, from Old English sl?w (sluggish, inert, slothful, late, tardy, torpid, slow), from Proto-Germanic *slaiwaz (blunt, dull, faint, weak, slack), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)lew- (limp). Cognate with Scots slaw (slow), Dutch sleeuw (blunt, dull), Low German slee (dull, sluggish), German schlehe, schleh (dull, exhausted, faint), Danish sløv (dull, torpid, drowsy), Swedish slö (slack, lazy), Icelandic sljór (dim-witted, slow).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /sl??/
  • (US) IPA(key): /slo?/
  • Rhymes: -??

Adjective

slow (comparative slower, superlative slowest)

  1. Taking a long time to move or go a short distance, or to perform an action; not quick in motion; proceeding at a low speed.
  2. Not happening in a short time; spread over a comparatively long time.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost
      These changes in the heavens, though slow, produced / Like change on sea and land, sidereal blast.
  3. Of reduced intellectual capacity; not quick to comprehend.
    • 1960, Dissertation Abstracts (volume 20, page 4007)
      Experienced classroom teachers are well acquainted with the attention-seeker, the shy girl, the aggressive boy, the poor concentrator, the slow student []
  4. Not hasty; not tending to hurry; acting with deliberation or caution.
    • 1999, Brian Paul Kaufman, K. Winston Caine, Prayer, Faith, and Healing: Cure Your Body, Heal Your Mind and Restore Your Soul
      And even after the emotional cast comes off, we need to be slow about getting deeply involved in a relationship again
    • 1611, King James Bible, Proverbs xiv 29
      He that is slow to wrath is of great understanding.
  5. (of a clock or the like) Behind in time; indicating a time earlier than the true time.
  6. Lacking spirit; deficient in liveliness or briskness.
  7. (of a period of time) Not busy; lacking activity.

Synonyms

  • (taking a long time to move a short distance): deliberate; moderate; see also Thesaurus:slow
  • (not happening in a short time): gradual; see also Thesaurus:gradual
  • (of reduced intellectual capacity): dull-witted; see also Thesaurus:stupid
  • (acting with deliberation): careful, deliberate, prudent; see also Thesaurus:cautious
  • (behind in time):
  • (lacking spirit): boring, dilatory, dull, inactive, tardy, slothful, sluggish; see also Thesaurus:inactive or Thesaurus:boring
  • (not busy): quiet, unbusy

Antonyms

  • (taking a long time to move a short distance): fast, quick, rapid, swift; see also Thesaurus:speedy
  • (not happening in a short time): abrupt, sudden; see also Thesaurus:sudden
  • (of reduced intellectual capacity): keen, quick, quick-witted; see also Thesaurus:intelligent
  • (acting with deliberation): hasty, precipitate, prompt; see also Thesaurus:prompt
  • (behind in time): accurate, fast
  • (lacking spirit): brisk, lively; see also Thesaurus:active
  • (not busy): hectic

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

slow (third-person singular simple present slows, present participle slowing, simple past and past participle slowed)

  1. (transitive) To make (something) run, move, etc. less quickly; to reduce the speed of.
  2. (transitive) To keep from going quickly; to hinder the progress of.
  3. (intransitive) To become slow; to slacken in speed; to decelerate.
    • After about a minute, the creek bed vomited the debris into a gently sloped meadow. Saugstad felt the snow slow and tried to keep her hands in front of her.

Synonyms

  • (keep from going quickly): delay, hinder, retard
  • (become slow): decelerate, slacken

Derived terms

  • slower
  • slow up
  • slow down

Translations

Noun

slow (plural slows)

  1. Someone who is slow; a sluggard.
  2. (music) A slow song.

Adverb

slow (comparative slower, superlative slowest)

  1. Slowly.
    • 1594, William Shakespeare, The Rape of Lucrece
      Let him have time to mark how slow time goes / In time of sorrow.

Anagrams

  • Lows, OWLs, lows, owls, sowl

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English slow.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /slo/

Noun

slow m (plural slows)

  1. slow waltz

See also

  • quick

Further reading

  • “slow” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [slow]

Noun

slow

  1. genitive of sl?

slow From the web:

  • what slows down your metabolism
  • what slows down a chemical reaction
  • what slows down the flow of electricity in a circuit
  • what slows the heart rate
  • what slows down bone healing
  • what slows down your period
  • what slows metabolism
  • what slows down a computer

slow in Examples From Wordnik

  • You see the hog's back trail was fifteen miles shorter than the Valley road and they could afford to go it slow; in fact, _very slow_.
  • This was a very slow business, and _too slow_ to suit me, yet I continued to run it about three months, when by repeated losses on decayed fruit, and the too frequent visits of relatives and friends, we found the business in an unhealthy condition and lost no time in looking up a buyer, which we were fortunate in finding and successful in getting a good price from.
  • His is a good example of what I term slow farming.
  • In today's New York Times, media writer Jeremy W. Peters examines what he characterizes as a slow decline of the Los Angeles Times newspaper since being bought in 2000 by The Tribune Company.
  • In today's New York Times, media writer Jeremy W. Peters examines what he characterizes as a slow decline of the Los Angeles Times newspaper since...
  • In today's New York Times, media writer Jeremy W. Peters examines what he characterizes as a slow decline of the Los Angeles Times newspaper since being bought in 2000 by The Tribune Company.
  • In today s New York Times, media writer Jeremy W. Peters examines what he characterizes as a slow decline of the Los Angeles Times newspaper since...
  • In today's New York Times, media writer Jeremy W. Peters examines what he characterizes as a slow decline of the Los Angeles Times newspaper since being bought in 2000 by The Tribune Company.
  • In today s New York Times, media writer Jeremy W. Peters examines what he characterizes as a slow decline of the Los Angeles Times newspaper since...
  • In today's New York Times, media writer Jeremy W. Peters examines what he characterizes as a slow decline of the Los Angeles Times newspaper since being bought in 2000 by The Tribune Company.


delayer

English

Etymology 1

delay +? -er

Noun

delayer (plural delayers)

  1. One who delays.
  2. A substance that is used to slow the rate of combustion of a solid rocket fuel so as to make it more controllable

Translations

Etymology 2

de- +? layer

Verb

delayer (third-person singular simple present delayers, present participle delayering, simple past and past participle delayered)

  1. (transitive) To remove layers from; to strip away levels from.
    • 2015, Elle Casey, Love in New York: Book 2 (Cabin Fever)
      I've put on every item of clothing I packed in about eight layers. [] Slowly as the morning wore on and I built up a sweat, I de-layered myself. Now I'm down to just two layers of clothing, including two pairs of gloves and socks.

Anagrams

  • Eardley, Ryedale, dearely, layered, relayed

delayer From the web:

  • what is delayed means
  • what does delayed mean
  • what is delayering in business
  • what is delayering in an organisation
  • what is delayering in business management
  • what does delayering do
  • what does delayed mean in french
  • what do delayering meaning

delayer in Examples From Wordnik

  • Among other findings:•Women with a college degree are experiencing what the bureau calls a "delayer boom" — they're having babies at later ages than other women and having fewer children overall.
  • Among other findings:•Women with a college degree are experiencing what the bureau calls a "delayer boom" — they're having babies at later ages than other women and having fewer children overall.
  • Obama has taken a very similar stance as Bush when it comes to the UN by demanding China and India participate and he has acted as a "delayer" when it comes to climate policy.
  • He said he's confident that recent changes in the leadership team and efforts to "delayer the organization" will improve its performance.
  • May 01, 2009 at 11: 58 PM try startup delayer to set some of the non-essential programs to start up later.
  • Mischel found that while the low delayer stared at the marshmallow until he could resist it no longer, high delayers distracted themselves, often playing with toys or singing while waiting for the researcher to return.
  • Mischel found that while the low delayer stared at the marshmallow until he could resist it no longer, high delayers distracted themselves, often playing with toys or singing while waiting for the researcher to return.
  • Mischel found that while the low delayer stared at the marshmallow until he could resist it no longer, high delayers distracted themselves, often playing with toys or singing while waiting for the researcher to return.
  • Although lesser dictionaries give it the abbreviated meaning of ‘delayer or procrastinator,’ the Oxford English Dictionary will inform that it was once more commonly used to mean ‘one who delays past the appropriate time for departure.’
  • Mischel found that while the low delayer stared at the marshmallow until he could resist it no longer, high delayers distracted themselves, often playing with toys or singing while waiting for the researcher to return.

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