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different between seize vs acquire

seize

English

Etymology

Earlier seise, from Middle English seisen, sesen, saisen, from Old French seisir (to take possession of; invest (person, court)), from Medieval Latin sac?re (to lay claim to, appropriate) (8th century) in the phrase ad propriam sacire, from Old Low Frankish *sakjan (to sue, bring legal action), from Proto-Germanic *sakjan?, *sak?n? (compare Old English sacian (to strive, brawl)), from Proto-Germanic *sakan? (compare Old Saxon sakan (to accuse), Old High German sahhan (to bicker, quarrel, rebuke), Old English sacan (to quarrel, claim by law, accuse). Cognate to sake and Latin sagio (to perceive acutely).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: s?z, IPA(key): /si?z/
  • Homophones: seas, sees

Verb

seize (third-person singular simple present seizes, present participle seizing, simple past and past participle seized)

  1. (transitive) To deliberately take hold of; to grab or capture.
    Synonyms: clasp, grasp, grip; see also Thesaurus:grasp
  2. (transitive) To take advantage of (an opportunity or circumstance).
    Synonym: jump on
  3. (transitive) To take possession of (by force, law etc.).
    Synonyms: arrogate, commandeer, confiscate
  4. (transitive) To have a sudden and powerful effect upon.
    • 2010, Antonio Saggio, A Secret van Gogh: His Motif and Motives, ?ISBN, 11:
      This sensation of an object becoming alive is a characteristic that, I believe, seizes all viewers of a van Gogh. The Bible goes beyond being a simple still-life object to become a living thing, an expression of strength, an existence that emanates from itself, beyond the painting surface to participate in our very lives.
  5. (transitive, nautical) To bind, lash or make fast, with several turns of small rope, cord, or small line.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To fasten, fix.
  7. (intransitive) To lay hold in seizure, by hands or claws (+ on or upon).
  8. (intransitive) To have a seizure.
  9. (intransitive) To bind or lock in position immovably; see also seize up.
    • 2012, Martha Holmberg, Modern Sauces: More Than 150 Recipes for Every Cook, Every Day (page 235)
      Chocolate seizes if a small amount of water (or watery liquid such as brandy) finds its way into the chocolate while it is melting. [] If chocolate seizes, it will look grainy and matte rather than glossy and smooth.
  10. (Britain, intransitive) To submit for consideration to a deliberative body.
  11. (law) (with of) To cause (an action or matter) to be or remain before (a certain judge or court).
    This Court will remain seized of this matter.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • seizure

Translations

References

  • seize in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “seize”, in OED Online ?, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000

French

Etymology

From Middle French seze, from Old French seize, seze, from Latin s?decim.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /s?z/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): [saiz]
  • Rhymes: -?z

Numeral

seize

  1. sixteen

Derived terms

  • seizième

Related terms

  • six
  • dix

Further reading

  • “seize” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Norman

Etymology

From Old French seize, from Latin s?decim.

Pronunciation

Numeral

seize

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) sixteen

seize From the web:

  • what seized means
  • what seize the day means
  • what size
  • what seized
  • what size bike do i need
  • what size is a queen bed
  • what size generator do i need
  • what size is a full bed

seize in Examples From Wordnik

  • If insurgents like the Taliban again seize power, do you think the women in any of those countries will fare better or worse?
  • If insurgents like the Taliban again seize power, do you think the women in any of those countries will fare better or worse?
  • We had no idea that this arcane "mother of all crimes" - ignored since World War II - would ever again seize public attention as it has recently, because of the conduct of John
  • Prudence, her eyes on him, felt alarmed when she saw what must have been a twinge of pain seize his body and pass over his face.
  • Elfrida began with "Ruin seize thee, ruthless King!" but there were parts of that which she liked best when there were other people about – so she stopped it, and began "Horatius and the Bridge."
  • "Look at 'Ruin seize thee, ruthless king!' and all the pieces of poetry about war and tyrants and slaughtered saints – and the one you made yourself about the black beetle, Noël."
  • He desired that he might go along with Christ (v. 18), perhaps for fear lest the evil spirit should again seize him; or, rather, that he might receive instruction from him, being unwilling to stay among those heathenish people that desired him to depart.
  • The only thing I seize is my pecker when I’m sitting at the computer.
  • This may cause the chocolate to seize, that is, to clump up.
  • This may cause the chocolate to seize, that is, to clump up.


acquire

English

Etymology

From Middle English acqueren, from Old French aquerre, from Latin acquir?; ad- + quaer? (to seek for). See quest.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /??kwa???/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /??kwa??/
  • Rhymes: -a??(?)
  • Hyphenation: ac?quire

Verb

acquire (third-person singular simple present acquires, present participle acquiring, simple past and past participle acquired)

  1. (transitive) To get.
  2. (transitive) To gain, usually by one's own exertions; to get as one's own
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, The Consideration of our Latter End (sermon)
      No virtue is acquired in an instant, but by degrees, step by step.
    • Descent is the title whereby a man, on the death of his ancestor, acquires his estate, by right of representation, as his heir at law.
  3. (medicine) To contract.
  4. (computing) To sample signals and convert them into digital values.

Synonyms

  • (get, gain): attain, come by, earn, gain, obtain, procure, secure, win

Antonyms

  • (get, gain): abandon, lose

Derived terms

  • acquired taste

Related terms

  • acquisition
  • acquirement
  • acquisitive
  • acquisitory

See also

  • obtain
  • reach

Translations


Latin

Verb

acqu?re

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of acqu?r?

acquire From the web:

  • what acquires carbon present in the atmosphere
  • what acquired mean
  • what acquired traits
  • what acquires raw materials and resources
  • what acquired immunity
  • what acquired assets
  • how is radiocarbon produced in the atmosphere
  • what releases carbon into the atmosphere

acquire in Examples From Wordnik

  • Only later, when fear had been replaced by boredom, did the term acquire a derogatory shading.
  • Only later, when fear had been replaced by boredom, did the term acquire a derogatory shading.
  • Only later, when fear had been replaced by boredom, did the term acquire a derogatory shading.
  • Only later, when fear had been replaced by boredom, did the term acquire a derogatory shading.
  • Not until the time of Linnæus (1707-1778) did the term acquire a definite and precise meaning.
  • The historical events which mothers take part in acquire the greatness and invincibility of natural phenomena.
  • The historical events which mothers take part in acquire the greatness and invincibility of natural phenomena.
  • I know an Aussie company who had been negotiating a possible buyout that would have seen them move across to join that firm but in the end the company in question decided to only recruit/acquire from the Bay Area!
  • Perhaps the most notorious example was Attorney General Robert Jackson's opinion (prior to the Lend-Lease Act) that existing statutes gave the President the authority to acquire from the British Government rights for the establishment of naval and air bases in exchange for over-age destroyers and obsolescent military material.
  • The principal object of this request is to enable me to obtain the countenance and protection of the government in the enterprise of conveying, exhibiting and explaining models and specimens of American arts and productions under the auspices of the American Institute, and of obtaining whatever information may be practicable to acquire from the ancient nation for the benefit of our country.

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