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different between sad vs hypochondriac

sad

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English sad, from Old English sæd (sated, full), from Proto-Germanic *sadaz (sated, satisfied), from Proto-Indo-European *seh?- (to satiate, satisfy).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sæd/
  • Rhymes: -æd

Adjective

sad (comparative sadder or more sad, superlative saddest or most sad)

  1. (heading) Emotionally negative.
    1. Feeling sorrow; sorrowful, mournful.
    2. Appearing sorrowful.
    3. Causing sorrow; lamentable.
      • 1911, G. K. Chesterton, The Ballad of the White Horse
        The Great Gaels of Ireland are the men that God made mad, / For all their wars are merry and all their songs are sad.
    4. Poor in quality, bad; shameful, deplorable; later, regrettable, poor.
    5. Of colours: dark, deep; later, sombre, dull.
      • 1679, Izaak Walton, The Life of Bishop Robert Sanderson
        sad-coloured clothes
      • Woad, or wade, is used by the dyers to lay the foundation of many colours, especially all sad colours.
  2. (obsolete) Sated, having had one's fill; satisfied, weary.
  3. (obsolete) Steadfast, valiant.
  4. (obsolete) Dignified, serious, grave.
    • 1509, Sebastian Brant, Alexander Barclay (translator), The Ship of Fools,
      Therfore it nedeth that better prouysion.
      Were founde for youthe by sad and wyse counsayle
  5. (obsolete) Naughty; troublesome; wicked.
    • 1860, Isaac Taylor, Ultimate Civilization
      Sad tipsy fellows, both of them.
  6. (slang) Unfashionable; socially inadequate or undesirable.
  7. (dialect) Soggy (to refer to pastries).
  8. (obsolete) Heavy; weighty; ponderous; close; hard.
    • Chalky lands are naturally cold and sad.
Synonyms
  • (feeling mentally uncomfortable): discomforted, distressed, uncomfortable, unhappy
  • (low in spirits): depressed, down in the dumps, glum, melancholy
  • (moving, full of feeling): poignant, touching
  • (causing sorrow): lamentable
  • (poor in quality): pitiful, sorry
  • See also Thesaurus:sad
  • See also Thesaurus:lamentable
Antonyms
  • happy
  • cheerful
  • gleeful, upbeat
  • decent
Derived terms
  • sadness
  • sadder
  • saddest
  • sadboi
  • sad sack
  • sadfishing
  • unsad
Related terms
  • sadden
Translations
Further reading
  • sad in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • sad in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Verb

sad (third-person singular simple present sads, present participle sadding, simple past and past participle sadded)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To make melancholy; to sadden or grieve (someone).
    • 16??, John Webster, Appius and Virginia
      My father's wondrous pensive, and withal / With a suppress'd rage left his house displeas'd, / And so in post is hurried to the camp: / It sads me much; to expel which melancholy, / I have sent for company.

Etymology 2

Noun

sad (plural sads)

  1. Alternative form of saad (Arabic letter)

Anagrams

  • ADS, ADs, ASD, AdS, Ads, DA's, DAS, DAs, DSA, SDA, ads, das

Cebuano

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: sad

Adverb

sad

  1. (focus) also; too
  2. (after a negative) either

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *sad?.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [?sat]

Noun

sad m

  1. orchard

Declension

Derived terms

  • sada? m
  • sadový

Further reading

  • sad in P?íru?ní slovník jazyka ?eského, 1935–1957
  • sad in Slovník spisovného jazyka ?eského, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Verb

sad

  1. past tense of sidde

Gothic

Romanization

sad

  1. Romanization of ????????????

Livonian

Alternative forms

  • (Courland) sa'd

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *sadek.

Noun

sad

  1. precipitation (hail, rain, snow)

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *sad? (plant, garden). Cognate with Upper Sorbian sad, Polish sad (orchard), Czech sad (orchard), Russian ??? (sad, orchard, garden), Old Church Slavonic ???? (sad?, plant, garden).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [sat]

Noun

sad m

  1. fruit (food)

Declension


Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *sadaz, from Proto-Indo-European *seh?- (to satiate, satisfy).

Adjective

sad (comparative sadoro, superlative sadost)

  1. full, sated, satiated
  2. weary

Declension


Descendants

  • Middle Low German sat

Polish

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *sad?.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sat/

Noun

sad m inan (diminutive sadek)

  1. orchard

Declension

Related terms

  • (noun) sadownik
  • (adjective) sadowy

Related terms

  • (verb) sadzi?

Further reading

  • sad in Wielki s?ownik j?zyka polskiego, Instytut J?zyka Polskiego PAN
  • sad in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Scots

Etymology

From Old English sæd.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /s?d/

Adjective

sad (comparative sadder, superlative saddest)

  1. grave, serious
  2. strange, remarkable
  3. sad

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology 1

From Proto-Slavic *s?da, *s?goda.

Alternative forms

  • s?da

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sâd/

Adverb

s?d (Cyrillic spelling ????)

  1. now
  2. currently
  3. presently

Etymology 2

From Proto-Slavic *saditi (to plant). Compare Serbo-Croatian saditi and Russian ??? (sad)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sâ?d/

Noun

s?d m (Cyrillic spelling ????)

  1. plant nursery, plantation, orchard (specialized facility rather than a home garden)
  2. a seeding or sapling from a plant nursery
Declension

References

  • “sad” in Hrvatski jezi?ni portal
  • “sad” in Hrvatski jezi?ni portal

Slovak

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *sad?.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sad/, [sat]

Noun

sad m (genitive singular sadu, nominative plural sady, genitive plural sadov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. garden, orchard, plantation

Declension

Derived terms

  • sadový
  • sadík

References

  • sad in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Slovene

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /sá?t/

Noun

s?d m inan

  1. fruit

Inflection

Further reading

  • sad”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran

Wakhi

Etymology

Compare Tajik ??? (sad).

Numeral

sad

  1. hundred

sad From the web:

  • what sad news about american idol
  • what sad scene concludes the epic
  • what saddam hussein did
  • what sad thing happened to gatsby
  • what sadist mean
  • what saddle does a pteranodon use
  • what sad movie should i watch
  • what saddle does hailey kinsel ride in

sad in Examples From Wordnik

  • My poor kitteh, known as William, Sir William of Lounge, Sir Lounge-a-lot, etc., has crwn too. *sad* *sad* He catches his booteefuls looooong tail in bafrum door and well, it not so loooooong now. *sad* *sad* We is sad kittehs tonite.
  • We know the once sad spirit now, no longer _sad_, the _radiant_ Genius of Humanity.
  • You will think this letter a very sad one, but _I feel sad_ ....
  • i not scare die (blah blah blah) i now very sad sad +sad me say sorry then she say
  • i not scare die (blah blah blah) i now very sad sad +sad me say sorry then she say
  • In fact, in my survey of parents, the word sad rarely appeared, although children were often described as “depressed.”
  • In fact, in my survey of parents, the word sad rarely appeared, although children were often described as “depressed.”
  • In fact, in my survey of parents, the word sad rarely appeared, although children were often described as “depressed.”
  • In fact, in my survey of parents, the word sad rarely appeared, although children were often described as “depressed.”
  • I was at the point of mental and physical fatigue when I cry so easily that all you have to do is say the word "sad" and my eyes start leaking.


hypochondriac

English

Alternative forms

  • hypochondriack (obsolete)

Etymology

From French hypocondriaque, from Ancient Greek ????????????? (hupokhondriakós, of the region between the ribs and navel), from ??????????? (hupokhóndrios, the space between the ribs and the navel), from ??? (hupó, below) + ??????? (khóndros, cartilage)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?ha?p???k?nd?iæk/, /?ha?p??k?nd?iæk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /?ha?po??k??nd?iæk/, /?ha?p??k??nd?iæk/

Adjective

hypochondriac (comparative more hypochondriac, superlative most hypochondriac)

  1. Related to, or affected by hypochondria
  2. Related to, or located in the hypochondrium.

Translations

Noun

hypochondriac (plural hypochondriacs)

  1. A person affected with hypochondria.

Synonyms

  • valetudinarian

Translations

hypochondriac From the web:

  • what hypochondriac means
  • what's hypochondriac region
  • what hypochondriacal delusions
  • hypochondriac what to do
  • hypochondriac what are the symptoms
  • hypochondriac what language
  • what does hypochondriac
  • what is hypochondriac pain

hypochondriac in Examples From Wordnik

  • Even the worst hypochondriac is limited (by time if nothing) in how many healthcare dollars he can suck up.
  • And David in Denton, Texas: "I made fun of all of those I referred to as hypochondriac, you know, always in for checkups.
  • Note to self: watching House MD cultivates my inner hypochondriac, which is very bad for my sanity.
  • I'm still labelled a hypochondriac, a lier, someone who's making things up.
  • Here, I'm viewed as a typical white person who can't handle pain. * sigh* I've been called a hypochondriac pretty much my entire life by pretty much the entire medical community.
  • I am a recovered hypochondriac, meaning that medical stoicism has become a matter of honor for me.
  • And if you get a history of going in and mentioning things that have not really been a problem very long, if you're not very lucky, you get a doctor who writes down "hypochondriac" or "drug-seeking," and then when it's still a problem later, you've got that to deal with.
  • And if you get a history of going in and mentioning things that have not really been a problem very long, if you're not very lucky, you get a doctor who writes down "hypochondriac" or "drug-seeking," and then when it's still a problem later, you've got that to deal with.
  • I would like to point out that my own hip problems of a while ago have gone away, lest anyone believe this is some kind of hypochondriac blog.
  • In the company of these eminent Victorians, the feeble Spencer presides as a kind of hypochondriac in chief.

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