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different between route vs manner

route

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, Ireland)
    • IPA(key): /?u?t/
    • Rhymes: -u?t
  • (General American)
    • IPA(key): /?u?t/, /?a?t/
    • Rhymes: -u?t, -a?t
  • (General Australian)
    • IPA(key): /???t/
    • Rhymes: -u?t
  • (Canada)
    • IPA(key): /?ut/
    • Rhymes: -ut
  • Homophones: root, rute (/?u?t/); rout (/?a?t/)

Etymology 1

From Middle English route, borrowed from Old French route, rote (road, way, path) (compare modern French route), from Latin (via) rupta ((road) opened by force), from rumpere viam "to open up a path". As a Chinese administrative division, a semantic loan from Chinese ? ().

Noun

route (plural routes)

  1. A course or way which is traveled or passed.
  2. A regular itinerary of stops, or the path followed between these stops, such as for delivery or passenger transportation.
  3. A road or path; often specifically a highway.
  4. (figuratively) One of multiple methods or approaches to doing something.
    • 2010, Damien McLoughlin and David A. Aaker, Strategic Market Management: Global Perspectives, John Wiley & Sons, ?ISBN, pages 156-7:
      If such an option is to viable over time, it needs to be protected against competitors. Having patent protection is one route. [] Another route is to have a programmatic investment strategy [] . Rolex has taken this route []
  5. (historical) One of the major provinces of imperial China from the Later Jin to the Song, corresponding to the Tang and early Yuan circuits.
  6. (computing) A specific entry in a router that tells the router how to transmit the data it receives.
Synonyms
  • (Chinese administrative division): lu, circuit, province
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

route (third-person singular simple present routes, present participle routing or (UK) routeing, simple past and past participle routed)

  1. (transitive) To direct or divert along a particular course.
    All incoming mail was routed through a single office.
  2. (Internet) to connect two local area networks, thereby forming an internet.
  3. (computing, transitive) To send (information) through a router.
Derived terms
  • reroute
  • router
Translations
See also
  • (Internet) bridge
  • (Internet) LAN
  • (Internet) WAN

Etymology 2

Verb

route

  1. Eye dialect spelling of root.

Further reading

  • route in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • route in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Toure, outer, outre, outré, rouet, utero-

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French route, from Old French route, from Latin rupta (via).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?ru.t?/
  • Hyphenation: rou?te
  • Rhymes: -ut?

Noun

route f (plural routes or routen, diminutive routetje n)

  1. route, course, way (particular pathway or direction one travels)
  2. road, route

Derived terms

  • fietsroute
  • marsroute
  • routebeschrijving
  • route-informatie
  • routekaart
  • routeplanner
  • routenavigatie
  • vaarroute
  • wandelroute

Descendants

  • ? Indonesian: rute

French

Etymology

From Middle French route, from Old French route, rote, from Latin rupta via.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?ut/
  • Rhymes: -ut

Noun

route f (plural routes)

  1. road (sometimes route like "Route 66")
  2. route, way, path

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “route” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • outre, outré, troue, troué

Middle English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Middle French, Old French route, rote, Anglo-French rute "troop, band"

Noun

route (plural routes)

  1. route
  2. a group of people
    1. band, company
      • '14th c. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales. The Miller's Prologue, 1-3
        Whan that the Knight hadde thus his tale ytold
        In all the route nas ther yong ne old
        That he ne saide it was a noble storye
    2. crowd, populace
    3. throng; gang, with connotation of illicit activity
  3. the proper condition of something

Etymology 2

From Old English hrutan, "to make a noise; snore" Compare Old Norse or Middle Dutch ruten, ruyten, Old Swedish ruta. For senses 4 and 5 compare Old Icelandic hrjota "to burst, spring forth."

Verb

route

  1. first-person singular present indicative of routen

Etymology 3

Converted from the noun route. Compare Old French aroter.

Verb

route

  1. first-person singular present indicative of routen

Norman

Etymology

From Old French route, from Latin rupta (via).

Noun

route f (plural routes)

  1. (Jersey) road
  2. (Jersey, nautical, of a watercraft) course

Old French

Alternative forms

  • rote
  • route

Etymology

From Latin rupta (via).

Noun

route f (oblique plural routes, nominative singular route, nominative plural routes)

  1. route (course or way which is traveled or passed)

Synonyms

  • chemin
  • curs
  • voie

Descendants

route From the web:

  • what router should i buy
  • what routers are compatible with xfinity
  • what router do i have
  • what router do i need
  • what router does spectrum use
  • what routers work with verizon fios
  • what routers work with spectrum
  • what route is the blue ridge parkway

route in Examples From Wordnik

  • Our route to this place was equally grand and experimental; grand, as to the width of the road, and beauty of the surrounding country -- but experimental, inasmuch as a part of the _route royale_ had been broken up, and rendered wholly impassable for carriages of any weight.
  • I proposed to travel with an English friend named Pottinger to Vienna, and thence by some adventurous route or other through Germany to Paris; which was a great deal more to undertake in those days than it now is, entailing several hundred per cent. more pain and sorrow, fasting, want of sleep and washing, than any man would encounter in these days in going round the world and achieving _la grande route_; or the common European tour, to boot.
  • I can get help from distribution companies, but certainly, I won't be going the label route.
  • I can get help from distribution companies, but certainly, I won't be going the label route.
  • Po, after KFP 1, took the Shaolin route from the Shaw Brothers, decided to go on one of those epic "mountain journeys" and ran into Uwe Boll dressed in Spartan gear weeping over his latest epic failure of video game to movie disasters … Po, feeling a sense passion, not to mention outrage at a possiblely gay film maker dressed in "manly" attire … decapitates Uwe and saves the gear …
  • In this case, the band decided to ignore the label route and go on its own -- and while the sales numbers don't seem all that exciting based on traditional metrics, in terms of the metric that counts the most to the band (money made), it's already made much more than its last record label album.
  • In this case, the band decided to ignore the label route and go on its own -- and while the sales numbers don't seem all that exciting based on traditional metrics, in terms of the metric that counts the most to the band (money made), it's already made much more than its last record label album.
  • Gas costs keep rising and the traffic congestion along the route is a major headache for drivers.
  • Another route is a Ruger Red Lable if you want to go the O/U route.
  • Another route is a Ruger Red Lable if you want to go the O/U route.


manner

English

Etymology

From Middle English maner, manere, from Anglo-Norman manere, from Old French maniere, from Vulgar Latin *man?ria, from feminine of Latin manuarius (belonging to the hand), from manus (hand). Compare French manière, Italian mannaia (ax, axe), Portuguese maneira and maneiro (handy, portable), Romanian mâner (handle), and Spanish manera.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?mæn?/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /?mæn?/
  • Hyphenation: man?ner
  • Homophones: manor, manna

Noun

manner (plural manners)

  1. Mode of action; way of performing or doing anything
  2. Characteristic mode of acting or behaving; bearing
    • 1661, John Fell, The Life of the most learned, reverend and pious Dr. H. Hammond
      During the whole time of his abode in the university he generally spent thirteen hours of the day in study; by which assiduity besides an exact dispatch of the whole course of philosophy, he read over in a manner all classic authors that are extant []
  3. One's customary method of acting; habit.
  4. good, polite behaviour
    • 1815, Jane Austen, Emma, Vol. I, Ch. 4
      Harriet was not insensible of manner; she had voluntarily noticed her father’s gentleness with admiration as well as wonder. Mr. Martin looked as if he did not know what manner was.
  5. The style of writing or thought of an author; the characteristic peculiarity of an artist.
  6. A certain degree or measure.
  7. Sort; kind; style.
  8. Standards of conduct cultured and product of mind.

Synonyms

(mode of action): method; style; form; fashion; way

Derived terms

Translations


Estonian

Alternative forms

  • mander

Etymology

From Proto-Finnic *manta. Cognate with Finnish manner, Ingrian mantere, and Ludian mander. Compare also Udmurt ????? (mudor, a mythical creature) and archaic Komi-Zyrian [script needed] (mudör, foundation).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?m?n?er/

Noun

manner (genitive mandri, partitive mandrit)

  1. continent
  2. mainland

Usage notes

The definition of manner in Estonian includes 6 continents: Africa (Aafrika), Antarctica (Antarktis), Australia (Austraalia), Eurasia (Euraasia), North America (Põhja-Ameerika), and South America (Lõuna-Ameerika).

Declension

See also

  • maailmajagu

Finnish

Alternative forms

  • mantere (not as common)

Etymology

Derived from Proto-Finnic *manta with +? -re, possibly from Proto-Finnic *maa, from Proto-Uralic *mëxe. Cognate to Estonian mander and Veps mandreh.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?m?n?er/, [?m?n?e?r]
  • Rhymes: -?n?er
  • Syllabification: man?ner

Noun

manner

  1. mainland (main landmass of a country, continent or sometimes of a group of islands)
    Sen tytärkaupungit, jotka ovat mantereella, surmataan miekalla, ja he tulevat tietämään, että minä olen Herra. (Hesekiel 26:6, Raamattu, vuoden 1933 käännös)
    Also her daughters who are on the mainland will be slain by the sword, and they will know that I am the Lord. (Ezekiel 26:6, New American Standard Bible)
    Ahvenanmaan suurinta saarta kutsutaan usein mantereeksi.
    The largest island of Åland archipelago is often called mainland.
  2. (geology) continent
    Määritelmästä riippuen mantereita on neljä, viisi, kuusi tai seitsemän.
    Depending on definition there are four, five, six or seven continents.
  3. (as modifier in compound terms) continental (of or pertaining to a continent)

Declension

Derived terms

  • mannermainen
  • mannermaisesti
  • mannermaisuus
  • mannermaisesti
  • mantereinen
  • mantereisuus

Compounds

See also

  • maanosa
  • tanner
  • kinner
  • mantu

References

Itkonen, Erkki; Kulonen, Ulla-Maija, editors (1992–2000) Suomen sanojen alkuperä [The origin of Finnish words] (in Finnish), Helsinki: Institute for the Languages of Finland/Finnish Literature Society, ?ISBN


Ingrian

Noun

manner

  1. continent

Luxembourgish

Adjective

manner

  1. comparative degree of mann

manner From the web:

  • what manner of man is this
  • what manner of man is this kjv
  • what manner of love kjv
  • what manner of death is a heart attack
  • what manner of man ought ye to be

manner in Examples From Wordnik

  • In the later edition, he takes occasion to say, in this connection, 'that as writing in the received manner no way obstructs the _manner of pronunciation_, but leaves that _free_, an innovation in it is of no purpose.'
  • For [6] when the ten Tribes were captivated, a Priest or the captivity was sent back to _Bethel_, by order of the King of _Assyria_, to instruct the new inhabitants of _Samaria_, in _the manner of the God of the land_; and the _Samaritans_ had the _Pentateuch_ from this Priest, as containing the law or _manner of the God of the land_, which he was to teach them.
  • The quoit formerly ufed by the Gre - cians was made of (tones, brafsor iron, which they threw by the help of a thong, put through a hole in the middle of it, but in a manner entirely different from that in which they threw the dart: then 'the hands were lifted, up and extended, whereas the difcus was hurled in the manner* of a bowl.
  • While the speech was breathtaking and inspirational, withholding such information in this manner is the same, in my opionion, as lying.
  • Voting against a person who conducts him or herself in such a manner is absolutely justified.
  • To be challenged in such a manner is an irresistible red flag to men like this, and certainly no less of one because the challenger was a rude, loud, irreverent braggart who had never been victorious in actual air-to-air combat.
  • To try to blame the difficulty away in this manner is a transparently empty dodge.
  • "To help end the streak by contributing in this manner is a huge lift for me," Person said.
  • "Well, you see," expounded John, unruffled, "as an adorer of the sex, and heir to a peerage, I shouldn't want to marry a woman unless I could support her in what they call a manner becoming her rank -- and I couldn't."
  • [text in the screen at this time reads: 'the iron triangle'] One of the companies that operates in this manner is the Carlyle Group.

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