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rig

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: r?g, IPA(key): /???/
  • Rhymes: -??

Etymology 1

From Early Modern English rygge, probably of North Germanic origin. Compare Norwegian rigge (to bind up; wrap around; rig; equip), Swedish dialectal rigga (to rig a horse). Possibly from Proto-Germanic *rik- (to bind), from Proto-Indo-European *rign-, *reyg- (to bind); or related to Old English *wr?han, wr?ohan, wr?ohan, wr?on (to bind; wrap up; cover). See also wry (to cover; clothe; dress; hide).

Noun

rig (plural rigs)

  1. (nautical) The rigging of a sailing ship or other such craft.
  2. Special equipment or gear used for a particular purpose.
  3. (US) A large truck such as a semi-tractor.
  4. The special apparatus used for drilling wells.
  5. (informal) A costume or an outfit.
  6. (slang, computing) A computer case, often modified for looks.
    • 2004, Radford Castro, Let Me Play: Stories of Gaming and Emulation (page 104)
      When I saw a special version of Quake running on Voodoo hardware, I knew I would be forking out quite a bit of money on my gaming rig.
  7. An imperfectly castrated horse, sheep etc.
  8. (slang) Radio equipment, especially a citizen's band transceiver.
  9. (animation) A model outfitted with parameterized controls for animation.
Translations

Verb

rig (third-person singular simple present rigs, present participle rigging, simple past and past participle rigged)

  1. (transitive) To fit out with a harness or other equipment.
    1. (transitive, nautical) To equip and fit (a ship) with sails, shrouds, and yards.
    2. (transitive, manufacturing) To move (a heavy object) with the help of slings, hoists, block and tackle, levers, or similar equipment.
  2. (transitive, informal) To dress or clothe in some costume.
  3. (transitive) To make or construct something in haste or in a makeshift manner.
  4. (transitive) To manipulate something dishonestly for personal gain or discriminatory purposes.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To make free with; hence, to steal; to pilfer.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, animation) To outfit a model with controls for animation.
Translations

Etymology 2

See ridge.

Noun

rig (plural rigs)

  1. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) A ridge.

Etymology 3

Compare wriggle.

Noun

rig (plural rigs)

  1. (obsolete) A wanton; one given to unbecoming conduct.
    • 1650, Thomas Fuller, A Pisgah-Sight of Palestine
      Let none condemn them for rigs, because thus hoiting with boys, seeing the simplicity of their age was a patent to privilege any innocent pastime, and few more years will make them blush themselves into better manners
  2. A promiscuous woman.
    • 1936: Like the Phoenix by Anthony Bertram
      However, terrible as it may seem to the tall maiden sisters of J.P.'s in Queen Anne houses with walled vegetable gardens, this courtesan, strumpet, harlot, whore, punk, fille de joie, street-walker, this trollop, this trull, this baggage, this hussy, this drab, skit, rig, quean, mopsy, demirep, demimondaine, this wanton, this fornicatress, this doxy, this concubine, this frail sister, this poor Queenie--did actually solicit me, did actually say 'coming home to-night, dearie' and my soul was not blasted enough to call a policeman.
  3. (obsolete) A sportive or unbecoming trick; a frolic.
    • 1782, William Cowper, The Diverting History of John Gilpin
      He little dreamt when he set out / Of running such a rig.
  4. (obsolete) A blast of wind.
    • 1796, Edmund Burke, Letters on a Regicide Peace
      that uncertain season before the rigs of old Michaelmas were yet well composed.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)

Verb

rig (third-person singular simple present rigs, present participle rigging, simple past and past participle rigged)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To play the wanton; to act in an unbecoming manner; to play tricks.
    • 1616, George Chapman, The Hymn to Hermes, in The Whole Works of Homer (tr.),
      Rigging and rifling all ways, and no noise / Made with thy soft feet, where it all destroys.
Synonyms
  • See Thesaurus:harlotize

Etymology 4

From ring (algebraic structure), omitting the letter n to suggest the lack of negatives. Compare structure like a ring but lacking a multiplicative identity.

Noun

rig (plural rigs)

  1. (algebra, ring theory) An algebraic structure similar to a ring, but without the requirement that every element have an additive inverse.
    • 2004, ACM SIGPLAN Notices, Volume 39, ACM Press, page 81,
      The set of natural numbers N with the usual operations of addition and multiplication is a rig, but not a ring. The set of integers Z is a ring. For a rig/ring (R,0,+,1,?), the set of polynomials R[x] on a generator x with the usual operations of addition and multiplication is also a rig/ring.
    • 2004, Jerzy Marcinkowski (editor), Computer Science Logic: 18th International Workshop, CSL 2004, Proceedings, Springer, LNCS 3210, page 17,
      It follows that for each object A its endomorphisms EndC(A) = C(A,A) has the structure of what is now called a rig, that is to say a (commutative) ring without negatives.
Synonyms
  • (algebraic structure like a ring but without additive inverses): semiring

Anagrams

  • G.R.I., GRI, IrG

Albanian

Etymology

From Greek ????? (rígas), cognate with the also borrowed Romanian rig?. Ultimately from Latin rex, thus forming a doublet of regj.

Noun

rig m (indefinite plural riga)

  1. (rare, card games) king in a pack of playing cards
    Synonyms: mbret, kerr

Derived terms

  • rigash

Related terms

  • regj

References


Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse ríkr (rich), from Proto-Germanic *r?kijaz, a derivative of *r?ks (king, ruler), itself a borrowing from Proto-Celtic *r?xs, from Proto-Indo-European *h?r??s.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [??i?]
  • Rhymes: -i??

Adjective

rig (neuter rigt, plural and definite singular attributive rige, comparative rigere, superlative (predicative) rigest, superlative (attributive) rigeste)

  1. rich (having wealth), wealthy, affluent
  2. exuberant, luxuriant
Inflection

Etymology 2

From English rig

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [?????]
  • Rhymes: -e?

Noun

rig c (singular definite riggen, plural indefinite rigge)

  1. rig (the arrangement of masts etc., the special apparatus used for drilling oil wells)
Inflection

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the main entry.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [?????]

Verb

rig

  1. imperative of rigge

Old Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?r??i?/

Verb

·rig

  1. first-person singular future conjunct of téit

Mutation

rig From the web:

  • what rights are protected by the first amendment
  • what rights do women not have
  • what right was roe’s argument based on
  • what rights are guaranteed in the bill of rights
  • what rights do citizens have
  • what rights do felons lose
  • what rights do students have in school
  • what rights do minors have

rig in Examples From Wordnik

  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.
  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.
  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.
  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.
  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.
  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.
  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.
  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.
  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.
  • But our other rig is a Freightliner M2 Sportchassis, so it's the Jeep or nothing.


deck

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d?k/
  • Rhymes: -?k

Etymology 1

From Middle English dekke, borrowed from Middle Dutch dec (roof, covering), from Middle Dutch decken, from Old Dutch thecken, from Proto-West Germanic *þakkjan, from Proto-Germanic *þakjan?. Formed the same: German Decke (covering, blanket). Doublet of thatch and thack.

Noun

deck (plural decks)

  1. Any raised flat surface that can be walked on: a balcony; a porch; a raised patio; a flat rooftop.
  2. (nautical) The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks.
    • Carried somehow, somewhither, for some reason, on these surging floods, were these travelers, []. Even such a boat as the Mount Vernon offered a total deck space so cramped as to leave secrecy or privacy well out of the question, even had the motley and democratic assemblage of passengers been disposed to accord either.
  3. (aviation) A main aeroplane surface, especially of a biplane or multiplane.
  4. (card games) A pack or set of playing cards.
  5. (card games, by extension) A set of cards owned by each individual player and from which they draw when playing.
    Synonym: library
  6. (journalism) A headline consisting of one or more actual lines of text.
    • 2005, Richard Keeble, Print Journalism: A Critical Introduction (page 114)
      If there's a strapline or subdeck, write these after the main deck and don't use the same words.
  7. A set of slides for a presentation.
    • 2011, David Kroenke, Donald Nilson, Office 365 in Business
      Navigate to the location where your PowerPoint deck is stored and select it.
  8. (obsolete) A heap or store.
    • 1655, Philip Massinger, The Guardian, Act III, scene iii:
      A paper-blurrer, who on all occasions, / For all times, and all season, hath such trinkets / Ready in the deck
  9. (slang) A folded paper used for distributing illicit drugs.
    • 2007, Reports of cases argued and determined in the Supreme Court of New Jersey (volume 188)
      Defendant placed the decks in his pocket and, after driving out of the city, gave one to Shore. While still in the car, Shore snorted half of the deck. When they returned to defendant's home, defendant handed Shore a second deck of heroin.
  10. (slang) The floor.
    We hit the deck as bullets began to fly.
  11. (theater) The stage.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

  1. (uncommon) To furnish with a deck, as a vessel.
  2. (informal) To knock someone to the floor, especially with a single punch.
    Wow, did you see her deck that guy who pinched her?
  3. (card games) To cause a player to run out of cards to draw, usually making them lose the game.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English dekken, from Middle Dutch dekken (to cover), from Old Dutch thecken, from Proto-West Germanic *þakkjan, from Proto-Germanic *þakjan? (to roof; cover).

Verb

deck (third-person singular simple present decks, present participle decking, simple past and past participle decked)

  1. (transitive, sometimes with out) To dress (someone) up, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3 Act III, Scene ii:
      And deck my body in gay ornaments, / And witch sweet ladies with my words and looks.
    • 1919, William Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, chapter 39
      They call beautiful a dress, a dog, a sermon; and when they are face to face with Beauty cannot recognise it. The false emphasis with which they try to deck their worthless thoughts blunts their susceptibilities.
  2. (transitive, sometimes with out) To decorate (something).
    • 1700, John Dryden (tr.), “The Flower and the Leaf”:
      (now the dew with spangles decked the ground)
  3. (transitive) To cover; to overspread.
Usage notes
  • See deck out
Derived terms
  • bedeck
Translations

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [d?k]

Verb

deck

  1. singular imperative of decken
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of decken

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English deck.

Noun

deck m (invariable)

  1. tape deck

Luxembourgish

Verb

deck

  1. second-person singular imperative of decken

deck From the web:

  • what deck size should i get
  • what deck is fierce guardianship in
  • what deck is deflecting swat in
  • what deck the halls means
  • what deck is dockside extortionist in
  • what deck means
  • what deck is lido on mardi gras
  • what deck height requires a railing

deck in Examples From Wordnik

  • I. ii.155 (14,6) [deck'd the sea] _To deck the sea_, if explained, to honour, adorn, or dignify, is indeed ridiculous, but the original import of the verb _deck_ is, _to cover_; so in some parts they yet say _deck the table_.
  • Board, together with the remainder of thofe on the quarter-deck; and the fliip Sill continuing to open very much, he ordered tarred canvas and hides to be nailed lore and aft, from under the fill* of the porta on the main deck under the fifth plank above, or within the water* ways, and the crew, without orders, did the fame on the lower deck*
  • The A380's upper passenger deck is almost as wide as the main deck of a 747, and the lower one is nineteen inches wider.
  • The A380's upper passenger deck is almost as wide as the main deck of a 747, and the lower one is nineteen inches wider.
  • And, sure enough, there on the deck is a guy is a brilliant, somewhat unworldly professor, busily sketching a design for a new lifeboat as the smoke billows in larger and larger clouds.
  • But please, do go on whining about how stacked the popular media deck is against socially liberal causes.
  • Bottom of the deck is a slavery code and the MSM has already fallen for it by not questioning the use of that phrase.
  • It’s just a card with a mechanic that encourages people to play with Goblins – the actual idea of the Goblin deck is yours and yours alone, even if it turns out that everyone else in the world had the exact same idea when they looked at the card.
  • Given the expense of discovery, the deck is stacked.
  • Maybe there really has been a dramatic decline in prejudice, and the deck is less stacked against black folks than it previously appeared.

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