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resentment

English

Etymology

From French ressentiment, from ressentir

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /???z?ntm?nt/
  • Hyphenation: re?sent?ment

Noun

resentment (countable and uncountable, plural resentments)

  1. Anger or displeasure stemming from belief that one has been wronged or betrayed by others; indignation.
    • 1812, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice, Chapter 3
      Amongst the most violent against him was Mrs. Bennet, whose dislike of his general behaviour was sharpened into particular resentment by his having slighted one of her daughters.
  2. (obsolete) The state of holding something in the mind as a subject of contemplation, or of being inclined to reflect upon it; feeling; impression.
    • 1688, Henry More, The Divine Dialogues
      He retains so vivid resentments of the more solid morality.
    • 1673, Jeremy Taylor, Heniaytos: A Course of Sermons for All the Sundays of the Year []
      It is a greater wonder that so many of them die, with so little resentment of their danger.
  3. (obsolete) satisfaction; gratitude
    • 1651, The Council Book
      The Council taking notice of the many good services performed by Mr. John Milton [] have thought fit to declare their resentment and good acceptance of the same.

Translations

See also

  • dudgeon
  • hold a grudge
  • umbrage
  • regret

resentment From the web:

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resentment in Examples From Wordnik

  • I think the resentment is a significant thing to consider when you evaluate AA policies, but in the end I think that an America without any AA policies in some form is a worse-off America.
  • The ruling Communist Party of India-Marxist (CPI-M) is hoping to cash in on what it calls resentment among people at the Tatas being forced to wind up the project here in Hooghly district due to sustained protests by farmers allied to the Trinamool Congress.
  • This kind of resentment is strange, to say the least, because despite the fact that the State of São Paulo has the biggest GDP and population in Brazil, and the most multiethnic and ‘transbrazilian’ metropolis in the country, only a small number of Presidents of Brazil have come from São Paulo.
  • There's a lot of resentment towards America in the rest of the world today, and "resentment" is putting it mildly.
  • At the same time, resentment is brewing in nations like Sweden over a rising tide of Muslim immigrants and the reluctance of some to adopt local customs, testing the limits of tolerance in some of the world's most open-minded societies.
  • At the same time, resentment is brewing in nations like Sweden over a rising tide of Muslim immigrants and the reluctance of some to adopt local customs, testing the limits of tolerance in some of the world's most open-minded societies.
  • But it also led to a certain resentment, over the course of 2008.
  • Keep talking after his face has pinched up in resentment and disgust, because you are RUINING his day and his BEER and his FUNNY.
  • But he adds that resentment is high against foreigners, especially among the millions of unemployed South Africans who live in shacks without water or sanitation.
  • The resentment is palpable and vociferous and unlimited.


passion

English

Etymology

From Middle English passioun, passion, from Old French passion (and in part from Old English passion), from Latin passio (suffering), noun of action from perfect passive participle passus (suffered), from deponent verb patior (I suffer), from Proto-Indo-European *peh?- (to hurt), see also Old English f?ond (devil, enemy), Gothic ???????????????????? (faian, to blame).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: p?sh'?n, IPA(key): /?pæ??n/
  • (US) IPA(key): [?p?æ??n]
  • Rhymes: -æ??n

Noun

passion (countable and uncountable, plural passions)

  1. Any great, strong, powerful emotion, especially romantic love or extreme hate.
  2. Fervor, determination.
  3. An object of passionate or romantic love or strong romantic interest.
  4. Sexual intercourse, especially when very emotional.
  5. (Christianity, usually capitalized) The suffering of Jesus leading up to and during his crucifixion.
  6. A display, musical composition, or play meant to commemorate the suffering of Jesus.
  7. (obsolete) Suffering or enduring of imposed or inflicted pain; any suffering or distress.
  8. (obsolete) The state of being acted upon; subjection to an external agent or influence; a passive condition
    Antonym: action
  9. (obsolete) The capacity of being affected by external agents; susceptibility of impressions from external agents.
  10. (obsolete) An innate attribute, property, or quality of a thing.
  11. (obsolete) Disorder of the mind; madness.

Synonyms

  • (fervor, determination): ardor, fire in the belly, zeal

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

passion (third-person singular simple present passions, present participle passioning, simple past and past participle passioned)

  1. (obsolete) To suffer pain or sorrow; to experience a passion; to be extremely agitated.
    • she passioned
      To see herself escap'd from so sore ills
  2. (transitive) To give a passionate character to.

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989) , “passion”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, ?ISBN

Anagrams

  • Pasions, Spinosa, saposin

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?p?s?ion/, [?p?s??io?n]
  • Rhymes: -?s?ion
  • Syllabification: pas?si?on

Noun

passion

  1. Genitive singular form of passio.

French

Etymology

From Middle French passion, from Old French passion, borrowed from Latin passi?, ultimately from patior. Cognate with patience.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pa.sj??/

Noun

passion f (plural passions)

  1. (countable and uncountable) passion

Derived terms

  • fruit de la passion

Related terms

  • compassion
  • pâtir

Further reading

  • “passion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Noun

passion

  1. Alternative form of passioun

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French passion.

Noun

passion f (plural passions)

  1. passion

Descendants

  • French: passion

Old English

Alternative forms

  • passio

Etymology

From Latin passio (suffering), noun of action from perfect passive participle passus (suffered), from deponent verb pati (suffer).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?p?s.si?un/

Noun

passion f (nominative plural passione)

  1. passion of Christ

Descendants

  • >? Middle English: passioun

References

  • John R. Clark Hall (1916) , “passion”, in A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, New York: Macmillan.
  • Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898) , “passion”, in An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin passio, passionem.

Noun

passion f (oblique plural passions, nominative singular passion, nominative plural passions)

  1. passion (suffering)
    1. (specifically, Christianity) the ordeal endured by Jesus in order to absolve humanity of sin

Descendants

  • Middle French: passion
    • French: passion
  • ? Middle English: passioun, pascioun, passion, passione, passioune, passiun, passyon, passyoun, passyun
    • English: passion, Passion
    • Scots: passion, patient

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (passion)
  • passiun on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

passion From the web:

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passion in Examples From Wordnik

  • Both should have character, and passion, and incident; but in the first the interest of the _story_ should pervade the whole, in the second the interest of the _passion_ should predominate.
  • His _passion_, passion of love, passion of suffering, in dying for a race.
  • Say rather _passion_ -- a passion that in one single hour had grown as large as my heart!
  • Johnson supposes to be derived from Pope's idea of the ruling passion, are not only obviated, but _that passion_ itself is shown to be conducive to our highest moral improvement. "
  • I may come away from a Shostakovitch symphony feeling uplifted or moved, but passion is a word I'd try not to use anymore.
  • I may come away from a Shostakovitch symphony feeling uplifted or moved, but passion is a word I'd try not to use anymore.
  • The word "passion" comes from the Latin root which quite literally means "to suffer."
  • Fresh off the smash Bridesmaids, Kristen Wiig is ready to plunge into what she refers to as her "passion project": a film titled Imogene.
  • The opinions that are held with passion are always those for which no good ground exists; indeed the passion is the measure of the holder's lack of rational conviction.
  • Ms. WHITE: Definitely that your passion is your product.

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