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different between readiness vs artifice

readiness

English

Etymology

ready +? -ness

Noun

readiness (usually uncountable, plural readinesses)

  1. The state or degree of being ready; preparedness.
  2. Willingness.

Translations

Anagrams

  • arsenides, nearsides

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readiness in Examples From Wordnik

  • Whatever your communitys values are, articulating the mission of a parent-school alliance creates clarity and what I call readiness for change.
  • That may be the place where we can address what we call the readiness gap even before students get to kindergarten.
  • Whatever your communitys values are, articulating the mission of a parent-school alliance creates clarity and what I call readiness for change.
  • Since the 1970s, several schools scattered around New Hampshire have placed kindergarteners in what they call readiness classes for up to a year before starting first grade; the classes are usually smaller and promote social development as much as academics.
  • Since the 1970s, several schools scattered around New Hampshire have placed kindergarteners in what they call readiness classes for up to a year before starting first grade; the classes are usually smaller and promote social development as much as academics.
  • The selective service system plans what it calls a readiness exercise.
  • Everything in readiness, I made a line fast to the apex of the shears and carried it directly to the windlass.
  • Mrs. McFee, emerging from the supper-room where all was in readiness, caught one flash of the blazing, questing eyes through the silken mask - slits, and received a start.
  • Our soldiers were in readiness to clear the court of its noisy vermin.
  • Next day, the mast-steps clear and everything in readiness, we started to get the two topmasts aboard.


artifice

English

Etymology

From Middle French artifice, from Latin artificium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /???(?)t?f?s/

Noun

artifice (countable and uncountable, plural artifices)

  1. A crafty but underhanded deception.
  2. A trick played out as an ingenious, but artful, ruse.
  3. A strategic maneuver that uses some clever means to avoid detection or capture.
  4. A tactical move to gain advantage.
  5. (archaic) Something made with technical skill; a contrivance.

Translations

Verb

artifice (third-person singular simple present artifices, present participle artificing, simple past and past participle artificed)

  1. To construct by means of skill or specialised art

Related terms

  • artificial

Further reading

  • artifice at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • artifice in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • actifier

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin artificium.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /a?.ti.fis/

Noun

artifice m (plural artifices)

  1. artifice, trick, ploy
  2. (literary) device

Derived terms

  • artificiel
  • feu d'artifice
  • sans artifice

Further reading

  • “artifice” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Noun

artifice

  1. ablative singular of artifex

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artifice in Examples From Wordnik

  • But thinking through the poem's artifice is only one way into it, and on the poem's own terms it is not necessarily a better path than the one pointed to by the rhetorical question of the
  • Maybe so, but I think there's also a sense in which readers of fantastic fiction become attuned to these irrationalities, such that when realist writers do introduce them as purportedly naturalistic events, the artifice is obvious.
  • This declaration of artifice is to the point because it both invests in the power of representation and recognizes its limitations.
  • Maybe so, but I think there's also a sense in which readers of fantastic fiction become attuned to these irrationalities, such that when realist writers do introduce them as purportedly naturalistic events, the artifice is obvious.
  • Spark, I think, would reply that the novelist can do nothing else, because she simply has this power over her characters; not to admit it, to hide that control in fathoms of agreeable artifice, is to act in bad faith.
  • Spark, I think, would reply that the novelist can do nothing else, because she simply has this power over her characters; not to admit it, to hide that control in fathoms of agreeable artifice, is to act in bad faith.
  • We think of the fecundity in artifice with which those of better brain,. no matter how they were handicapped by law, would still outwit those of poorer brain, showing an intensified bitterness born of the class struggle in whose ruthlessness they had been bidden to believe.
  • This, my Lord, you are permitted to do; they have no means of resistance; but think not to impose on me by a sophistical assertion of right, or to gloss the villainy of your conduct with the colours of justice; the artifice is beneath the desperate force of your character, and is not sufficiently specious to deceive the discernment of virtue.
  • Last Sunday on This Week With David Brinkley, Cokie Roberts dismissed Clinton's conduct as an "artifice" -- an exercise in campaign strategy.
  • They assumed that we must live by artifice, and they entitled artifice 'Science.'"

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