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press

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /p??s/
  • Rhymes: -?s

Etymology 1

Middle English presse (throng, crowd, clothespress), partially from Old English press (clothespress) (from Medieval Latin pressa) and partially from Old French presse (Modern French presse) from Old French presser (to press), from Latin press?re, from pressus, past participle of premere (to press). Displaced native Middle English thring (press, crowd, throng) (from Old English þring (a press, crowd, anything that presses or confines)).

Noun

press (countable and uncountable, plural presses)

  1. (countable) A device used to apply pressure to an item.
  2. (countable) A printing machine.
    Synonym: printing press
  3. (uncountable, collective) The print-based media (both the people and the newspapers).
  4. (countable) A publisher.
  5. (countable, especially in Ireland and Scotland) An enclosed storage space (e.g. closet, cupboard).
  6. (countable, weightlifting) An exercise in which weight is forced away from the body by extension of the arms or legs.
    • 1974, Charles Gaines & George Butler, Pumping Iron: The Art and Sport of Bodybuilding, p.22:
      This is the fourth set of benchpresses. There will be five more; then there will be five sets of presses on an inclined bench [].
  7. (countable, wagering) An additional bet in a golf match that duplicates an existing (usually losing) wager in value, but begins even at the time of the bet.
  8. (countable) Pure, unfermented grape juice.
  9. A commission to force men into public service, particularly into the navy.
    Synonym: press-gang
  10. (obsolete) A crowd.
    • And he sought to see Jesus who he was; and could not for the press, because he was little of stature.
  11. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
  12. (psychology) In personology, any environmental factor that arouses a need in the individual.
    • 2009, Allison E. Smith, Ageing in Urban Neighbourhoods (page 88)
      The environmental comfort category is illustrative of cases in which there are low environmental presses matched against a number of personal competences.
Synonyms
  • (storage space): See closet, cupboard, pantry
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Middle English pressen (to crowd, thring, press), from Old French presser (to press) (Modern French presser) from Latin press?re, from pressus, past participle of premere "to press". Displaced native Middle English thringen (to press, crowd, throng) (from Old English þringan (to press, crowd)), Middle English thrasten (to press, force, urge) (from Old English þr?stan (to press, force)), Old English þryscan (to press), Old English þ?wan (to press, impress).

Verb

press (third-person singular simple present presses, present participle pressing, simple past and past participle pressed or prest)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To exert weight or force against, to act upon with force or weight; to exert pressure upon.
  2. (transitive, mechanics, electronics) To activate a button or key by exerting a downward or forward force on it, and then releasing it.
    Synonyms: strike, hit, depress
  3. (transitive) To compress, squeeze.
    Synonyms: thring, thrutch; see also Thesaurus:compress
  4. (transitive) To clasp, hold in an embrace.
    Synonym: hug
  5. (transitive) To reduce to a particular shape or form by pressure, especially flatten or smooth.
  6. (transitive, sewing) To flatten a selected area of fabric using an iron with an up-and-down, not sliding, motion, so as to avoid disturbing adjacent areas.
  7. (transitive) To drive or thrust by pressure, to force in a certain direction.
    Synonyms: thring, thrutch
  8. (transitive, obsolete) To weigh upon, oppress, trouble.
  9. (transitive) To force to a certain end or result; to urge strongly.
    Synonym: impel
  10. To try to force (something upon someone).
    Synonyms: urge, inculcate
  11. (transitive) To hasten, urge onward.
  12. (transitive) To urge, beseech, entreat.
  13. (transitive) To lay stress upon.
    Synonym: emphasize
  14. (transitive, intransitive) To throng, crowd.
    Synonyms: thring, thrutch; see also Thesaurus:assemble
  15. (transitive, obsolete) To print.
  16. To force into service, particularly into naval service.
    Synonym: press-gang
Derived terms
  • press charges
  • press on
Translations

See also

  • hot press (baking, laundry)
  • hot off the press (printing)
  • press down

References

  • Entry for the imperfect and past participle in Webster's dictionary
  • press in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “press”, in OED Online ?, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, launched 2000

Anagrams

  • ERSPs, RESPs, SERPs, Spers

German

Verb

press

  1. singular imperative of pressen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of pressen

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From the verb presse

Noun

press n (definite singular presset, indefinite plural press, definite plural pressa or pressene)

  1. pressure
  2. (weightlifting) a press
Related terms
  • trykk

Etymology 2

Verb

press

  1. imperative of presse

References

  • “press” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “press_1” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From the verb presse

Noun

press n (definite singular presset, indefinite plural press, definite plural pressa)

  1. pressure
  2. (weightlifting) a press

Related terms

  • trykk

References

  • “press” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Spanish

Noun

press m (plural press)

  1. press (exercise)

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

press c

  1. a press; a tool that applies pressure (to make things flat, to make juice)
  2. a (printing) press
    stoppa pressarna
    stop the presses
  3. the press (newspapers, journalism as a branch of society)
  4. (mental) pressure
  5. a muscle exercise that applies pressure

Declension

Related terms

  • apelsinpress
  • bänkpress
  • benpress
  • blompress
  • brevpress
  • pressa
  • pressbyrå
  • pressfrihet
  • pressning
  • tryckpress

press From the web:

  • what pressure should my tires be
  • what pressure points drain sinuses
  • what pressure point relieves a headache
  • what pressure should tires be
  • what pressure point relieves tooth pain
  • what pressure plate stops mobs
  • what pressure system is a hurricane
  • what pressure should my boiler be at

press in Examples From Wordnik

  • If you'd like to explore how the world of the university press world is gettin' free, try this search on Google or Yahoo along with your favorite keywords: ?university press? free download site:edu .
  • McCain and Palin are laughing at the press -- and it's the press 'fault yahooBuzzArticleHeadline =' McCain and Palin are laughing at the press -- and it\'s the press\ 'fault'; yahooBuzzArticleSummary = 'Article: The press throughout this race has walked away from any semblance of traditional standards, yet journalists seemed oblivious to the long-term implications of their chronic embrace of fluff.
  • If you'd like to explore how the world of the university press world is gettin' free, try this search on Google or Yahoo along with your favorite keywords: ?university press? free download site:edu .
  • A specialized type of hydraulic press is known as the ?ram press?.
  • Oh! the Lord help you not to draw back, but to press on, _press on, press on_, never minding the consequences.
  • Oh! the Lord help you not to draw back, but to press on, _press on, press on_, never minding the consequences.
  • Oh! the Lord help you not to draw back, but to press on, _press on, press on_, never minding the consequences.
  • I did with the onions and scallions neither, barring by great luck they'd be in and under the press here -- (_running to look under the press_) -- which they are, praised be God! in the far corner.
  • Try these outside the box techniques: close grip bench press floor bench press (elbows on the floor) pin press* board press*
  • Thus, a vast concern is expressed for the ?liberty of the press, ? and the utmost abhorrence of its ?licentiousness?: but then, by the licentiousness of the press is meant every disclosure by which any abuse is brought to light and exposed to shame?by the ?liberty of the press? is meant only publications from which no such inconvenience is to be apprehended; and the fallacy consists in employing the sham approbation of liberty as a mask for the real opposition to all free discussion.


prod

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English brodden, from Old Norse broddr (shaft, spike), from Proto-Germanic *bruzdaz. Cognate with Icelandic broddur, Danish brod.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /p??d/
  • (US) IPA(key): /p??d/
  • Rhymes: -?d

Verb

prod (third-person singular simple present prods, present participle prodding, simple past and past participle prodded)

  1. (transitive) To poke, to push, to touch.
  2. (transitive, informal) To encourage, to prompt.
  3. (transitive) To prick with a goad.
Translations

Noun

prod (plural prods)

  1. A device (now often electrical) used to goad livestock into moving.
  2. A prick or stab with such a pointed instrument.
  3. A poke.
    "It's your turn," she reminded me, giving me a prod on the shoulder.
  4. A light kind of crossbow; a prodd.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fairholt to this entry?)
Derived terms
  • cattle prod
Translations
Further reading
  • Cattle prod on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

Shortened from production.

Noun

prod (countable and uncountable, plural prods)

  1. (programming, slang, uncountable) Short for production (the live environment).
    We've hit ten million users in prod today.
  2. (demoscene, slang, countable) A production; a created work.
    Check our BBS for the latest prods.

Anagrams

  • dorp, drop

Old French

Noun

prod m (nominative singular proz)

  1. (early Old French) Alternative form of pro

prod From the web:

  • what produces bile
  • what produces insulin
  • what produces antibodies
  • what produces testosterone
  • what produces sperm
  • what produces gametes
  • what produces estrogen
  • what products contain paraquat

prod in Examples From Wordnik

  • Hopefully not by me. * hint hint, prod prod* I should probably get around to subbing those in-game movies too.
  • Speaking from experience, there are a lot of distractions at the show and a gentle prod from a collector is a good way to remind me to hold a coin.
  • With AFL/CIO in bed with Oregon Industries, Business Alliance, and Chamber of Commerce you know you have been bent over and the cattle prod is coming.
  • Like this one best but they were all superb efforts I prod is fabulous too!!!
  • The mutawwa'in prod shoppers to say their devotions when the shops close for prayer, several times daily.
  • The mutawwa'in prod shoppers to say their devotions when the shops close for prayer, several times daily.
  • The mutawwa'in prod shoppers to say their devotions when the shops close for prayer, several times daily.
  • Carlotta was a "prod"; it was only because she came at the end of the alphabet that she was left out, but thanks to Betty's fly-away fashion of running off to speak to some junior ushers, and then calling the Blunderbuss, whose mother wanted to see her a minute, nobody could find out positively who it was that had been "flunked out" of 19 --.
  • Clara Ellis, a rather lugubrious individual, who had been put on the committee because she was a "prod" in "English lit.," and not because she had the least bit of executive ability.
  • Drawn at first by my incredulity that any­one would actu­ally name a prod­uct “Nads”, I quickly got sucked in by the fun Aus­tralian accents, the video (shown over and over) of a wife wax­ing her husband’s back hair, and the infec­tious exu­ber­ance of the prod­uct demon­stra­tors.

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