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palatine

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?pal.?.t??n/, /?pal.?.t?n/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /?pæl.??ta?n/, (fur cape or stole) /?pæl.??tin/
  • Rhymes: -æl?ta?n, -æl?t?n

Etymology 1

Middle English, borrowed from Middle French palatin, from Medieval Latin pal?t?nus (relating to the palace), from pal?tium (palace) +? -?nus (-ine, adjectival suffix). Doublet of paladin.

Adjective

palatine (not comparable) (usually postpositive)

  1. (historical) (of an official or feudal lord) Having local authority and possessing royal privileges that elsewhere belongs only to a sovereign. [from 15th c.]
    1. (of a territory) Subject to palatine authority. [from 15th c.]
  2. Pertaining to the Elector Palatine or the German Palatinate or its people. [from 16th c.]
  3. Of or relating to a palace especially of a Roman or Holy Roman Emperor.
  4. Synonym of palatial. [from 16th c.]
Related terms
  • palace
  • palatial

Noun

palatine (plural palatines)

  1. A feudal lord (ellipsis of count palatine) or a bishop possessing palatine powers. [from 16th c.]
  2. A palace official, especially in an imperial palace. [from 16th c.]
    Synonym: chief minister
  3. (historical) Ellipsis of county palatine. [from 16th c.]
    Synonym: palatinate
  4. (capitalized, rare, obsolete) A native or inhabitant of the Palatinate. [17th c.]
  5. (in the plural, historical) The Roman soldiers of the imperial palace. [from 17th c.]
    Synonym: praetorians
Derived terms
  • count palatine
  • county palatine
  • palatinate
Related terms
  • count palatinate
  • county palatinate
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French Palatine, named after German Princess Palatine Elisabeth Charlotte (1652–1722).

Noun

palatine (plural palatines)

  1. (historical) A fur cape or stole for women which covers the neck and shoulders. [from 17th c.]

Etymology 3

Borrowed from French palatin, from New Latin pal?t?nus, from pal?tum (the palate) +? -?nus (-ine, adjectival suffix).

Adjective

palatine (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy) Of or relating to the palate or to a palatine bone.

Derived terms

Noun

palatine (plural palatines)

  1. (anatomy) Ellipsis of palatine bone.

References

  • “palatine”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “palatine”, in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary, (Please provide a date or year).

French

Etymology

From ‘Princess Palatine’ Anne Gonzaga, who popularised the garment.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pa.la.tin/

Noun

palatine f (plural palatines)

  1. (historical) tippet, shoulder cape

Further reading

  • “palatine” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • lapaient

Italian

Adjective

palatine f pl

  1. feminine plural of palatino

Anagrams

  • entalpia
  • penalità
  • piantale
  • planiate

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /pa.la??ti?.ne/, [pä??ä??t?i?n?]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /pa.la?ti.ne/, [p?l??t?i?n?]

Adjective

pal?t?ne

  1. vocative masculine singular of pal?t?nus

palatine From the web:

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palatine in Examples From Wordnik

  • Its lower portion, which hangs like a curtain between the mouth and pharynx is termed the palatine velum.
  • That no serious trouble ever came from the so-called palatine earldoms is itself evidence of the powerful monarchy ruling in England.
  • The distressed family of the palatine was a great burden on James, during part of his reign.
  • Its skeleton segmented, as in mammals and birds, into three parts; the upper part gave rise to the palatine and pterygoid in Anura, but seemed to disappear in Urodeles, where the so-called palatine and pterygoid developed in the mucous membrane of the mouth; the middle part gave, as in birds, the quadrate, which formed a suspensorium for both arches; the lower part, as Meckel's cartilage, formed a foundation for the bones of the lower jaw.
  • "palatine" clergy, from the middle of the twelfth century, coupled with the disappearance of the judices palatini, tended to enlarge the share of the cardinals in the administration of papal justice and finances, also of the fiefs of the Holy See and of the States of the
  • Thus Reichert interpreted the "palatine" and "pterygoid," which are formed in the mouth of the newt larva by a fusion of conical teeth, as special adaptations to enable the little larva to lead a carnivorous life. [
  • An English ‘county palatine’ was a county over which an earl or lord originally had royal privileges with the right of exclusive civil and criminal jurisdiction.
  • “Because it was once a county palatine and the cats cannot help laughing whenever they think of it, though I see no great joke in it.”
  • An English ‘county palatine’ was a county over which an earl or lord originally had royal privileges with the right of exclusive civil and criminal jurisdiction.
  • “Because it was once a county palatine and the cats cannot help laughing whenever they think of it, though I see no great joke in it.”


palatize

English

Alternative forms

  • palatise

Etymology

palate +? -ize

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?pæl?ta?z/
  • (US) IPA(key): /?pæl?ta?z/, /?pæl?ta?z/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): /?pæl?t?ez/
  • Homophones: palettize, palletize

Verb

palatize (third-person singular simple present palatizes, present participle palatizing, simple past and past participle palatized)

  1. Synonym of palatalize

palatize From the web:

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palatize in Examples From Wordnik

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