free hit counter

different between obscurity vs depression

obscurity

English

Etymology

From Middle French obscurité, from Latin obsc?rit?s; synchronically analyzable as obscure +? -ity

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?b?skj????ti/, /?b?skj????ti/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /?b?skj???ti/, /?b?skj??ti/
  • Hyphenation: ob?scur?ity

Noun

obscurity (countable and uncountable, plural obscurities)

  1. (literary) Darkness; the absence of light.
    • 1919, W. Somerset Maugham, The Moon and Sixpence, ch. 24
      I walked in, and Stroeve followed me. The room was in darkness. I could only see that it was an attic, with a sloping roof; and a faint glimmer, no more than a less profound obscurity, came from a skylight.
  2. The state of being unknown; a thing that is unknown.
  3. The quality of being difficult to understand; a thing that is difficult to understand.

Synonyms

  • (the state of being unknown): unknownness

Antonyms

  • (the state of being known): fame
  • (the state of being clear): clarity

Related terms

  • obscure

Translations

obscurity From the web:

  • what obscurity means
  • obscurity what does that word mean
  • what does obscurity mean
  • what does obscurity mean in the bible
  • what is obscurity rating
  • what does obscurity rating mean
  • what does obscurity
  • what do obscurity mean

obscurity in Examples From Wordnik

  • While any list that highlights lesser known people who toil in obscurity is a good thing i would suggest the following:
  • Now I appreciate that it may be a political fact of life in Canada that the surest way to send an up-and-coming cabinet minister to obscurity is to suggest that he has a great and glorious future before him, particularly when his Prime Minister is relatively young and healthy.
  • Closer to our own time, Joseph Heller and William Gaddis spent years in obscurity doing menial writing-related work in order to write novels that at first few people cared about.
  • Hardly content to toil in obscurity, Schumer honed his ability to insert himself front and center into the biggest issues of the day.
  • I definitely think obscurity is worse for authors.
  • It is an unlikely position for a company that, had it complied with collusive Japanese business traditions and paid heed to the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, would be stuck in obscurity making piston rings.
  • In each of those incredibly successful series there were stars that rose to the next level and others who have wallowed in obscurity (self-imposed or otherwise).
  • May you live in obscurity and forever be associated with amongst your many crimes Abu Ghraib as Nixon is to Wartergate. —
  • The spectacular mistiming of his own 2001 memoir, Fugitive Days, doomed the book to short-term infamy and long-term obscurity.
  • The spectacular mistiming of his own 2001 memoir, Fugitive Days, doomed the book to short-term infamy and long-term obscurity.


depression

English

Etymology

From Old French depression, from Latin depressio.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /d??p????n/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /d??p???(?)n/
  • Rhymes: -???n
  • Hyphenation: de?pres?sion

Noun

depression (countable and uncountable, plural depressions)

  1. (psychology) In psychotherapy and psychiatry, a state of mind producing serious, long-term lowering of enjoyment of life or inability to visualize a happy future.
  2. (geography) An area that is lower in topography than its surroundings.
  3. (psychology) In psychotherapy and psychiatry, a period of unhappiness or low morale which lasts longer than several weeks and may include ideation of self-inflicted injury or suicide.
  4. (meteorology) An area of lowered air pressure that generally brings moist weather, sometimes promoting hurricanes and tornadoes.
  5. (economics) A period of major economic contraction.
  6. (economics, US) Four consecutive quarters of negative, real GDP growth. See NBER.
  7. The act of lowering or pressing something down.
    Depression of the lever starts the machine.
  8. (biology, physiology) A lowering, in particular a reduction in a particular biological variable or the function of an organ, in contrast to elevation.

Related terms

  • depress
  • depressant
  • depressing
  • depressive

Translations

See also

  • downturn

Further reading

  • National Bureau of Economic Research on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

  • depression at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • depression in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • depression in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • opensiders, personised, sideperson

Danish

Noun

depression c (singular definite depressionen, plural indefinite depressioner)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Declension

Further reading

  • “depression” in Den Danske Ordbog

Finnish

Noun

depression

  1. Genitive singular form of depressio.

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

depression c

  1. depression (all meanings).

Declension

depression From the web:

  • what depression feels like
  • what depression looks like
  • what depression does to the brain
  • what depression do i have
  • what depression looks like meme
  • what depression medication is best for me
  • what depression do i have quiz
  • what depression feels like quotes

depression in Examples From Wordnik

  • In fact, the word depression has virtually replaced unhappiness in our internal vocabularies.
  • In fact, the word depression has virtually replaced unhappiness in our internal vocabularies.
  • If she took on too much, if she became overly excited, she could tumble into a state of despair for which the term "depression" seems rather mild.
  • If she took on too much, if she became overly excited, she could tumble into a state of despair for which the term "depression" seems rather mild.
  • In fact, the word depression has virtually replaced unhappiness in our internal vocabularies.
  • One cold shower and two cold beers later: stress, and its darker cousin depression, is a serious problem in Japan, I feel, but not one that is very well understood.
  • After World War II, the term depression lapsed into disuse, because economic downturns became milder and rarely involved general deflation (price declines).
  • I had never heard of the word depression when I was a child.
  • I had never heard of the word depression when I was a child.
  • "Just as the NBER does not define the term depression or identify depressions, there is no formal NBER definition or dating of the Great Depression," the bureau's website says.

you may also like

+1
Share
Pin
Like
Send
Share