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different between objective vs burden

objective

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French objectif, from Latin obiect?vus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /?b?d???k.t?v/, /?b?d???k.t?v/
  • (US) IPA(key): /?b?d???k.t?v/
  • Rhymes: -?kt?v

Adjective

objective (comparative more objective, superlative most objective)

  1. Of or relating to a material object, actual existence or reality.
  2. Not influenced by the emotions or prejudices.
  3. Based on observed facts; without subjective assessment.
  4. (grammar) Of, or relating to a noun or pronoun used as the object of a verb.
  5. (linguistics, grammar) Of, or relating to verbal conjugation that indicates the object (patient) of an action. (In linguistic descriptions of Tundra Nenets, among others.)
    • 2014, Irina Nikolaeva, A Grammar of Tundra Nenets, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, ?ISBN
      The general finite stem is the verbal stem which serves as the basis of inflection in the indicative present and past in the subjective conjugation and the objective conjugation with the singular and dual object.

Usage notes

  • Said of account, judgment, criteria, person, existence, or observation.

Antonyms

  • subjective

Derived terms

  • nonobjective
  • objective correlative
  • objectivity

Translations

Noun

objective (plural objectives)

  1. A material object that physically exists.
  2. A goal that is striven for.
    • Objectives are the stepping stones which guide you to achieving your goals. They must be verifiable in some way, whether that?s statistically – ‘the more I do this, the better I get at it? – or by some other achievable concept such as getting the job or relationship that you want. It?s crucial that your objectives lead you logically towards your goal and are quantifiable.
  3. (grammar) The objective case.
    Synonyms: object case, objective case
  4. (grammar) a noun or pronoun in the objective case.
  5. The lens or lenses of a camera, microscope, or other optical device closest to the object being examined.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:goal

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?b.??k.tiv/
  • Homophone: objectives

Adjective

objective

  1. feminine singular of objectif

Latin

Adjective

object?ve

  1. vocative masculine singular of object?vus

objective From the web:

  • what objective to put on resume
  • what objective means
  • what objectives are on a microscope
  • what objective is used to play tennis
  • what objective is used for oil immersion
  • what objective basis is required for an arrest
  • what is an example of a objective
  • what is a good objective

objective in Examples From Wordnik

  • Yet he insisted, on the contrary, that values are objective, even going so far as to label his position ˜objective pluralism™.
  • VIEW FAVORITES yahooBuzzArticleHeadline = 'New poll reflects growing U.S. worry over Iraq'; yahooBuzzArticleSummary = '56 percent in the poll said the United States was not its objective in Iraq -- what ever the hell the \'objective\' is?? '
  • The outer or objective process, however, shows in animals strongly controlled by instinct, as insects for instance, a preponderance of the ganglion -- _i. e., subjective_ nervous system over the _objective_ or cerebral system.
  • We must protect our struggle against forces which sound correct but whose objective is entirely to destroy the cause, the ·objective, of our revolutionary struggle ".
  • But writer Zantoshi Kanazawa makes many other bizarre allegations, using the term "objective attractiveness" frequently without explanation of how a subjective characterization could possibly be
  • Our main objective is not to prevent multinationals from getting minerals.
  • Our main objective is not to prevent multinationals from getting minerals.
  • When you submit a novel proposal to an agent or publisher, your main objective is to show that your novel will sell.
  • The main objective is for the fellow to gain an appreciation of the dynamic nature of the studies that is lost on review of the static images.
  • The main objective is for the fellow to view numerous biopsy specimens daily and to see multiple normal biopsies with the pathologists.


burden

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English burden, birden, burthen, birthen, byrthen, from Old English byrden, byrþen, from Proto-West Germanic *burþini, from *burþ?, from Proto-Germanic *burþ??, from Proto-Indo-European *b?er- (to carry, bear).

Alternative forms

  • burthen (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?b??dn/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /?b?dn/
  • Rhymes: -??(?)d?n

Noun

burden (plural burdens)

  1. A heavy load.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      There were four or five men in the vault already, and I could hear more coming down the passage, and guessed from their heavy footsteps that they were carrying burdens.
  2. A responsibility, onus.
  3. A cause of worry; that which is grievous, wearisome, or oppressive.
    • c. 1710-1730, Jonathan Swift, The Dean's Complaint Translated and Answered
      Deaf, giddy, helpless, left alone, / To all my friends a burden grown.
  4. The capacity of a vessel, or the weight of cargo that she will carry.
    a ship of a hundred tons burden
  5. (mining) The tops or heads of stream-work which lie over the stream of tin.
  6. (metalworking) The proportion of ore and flux to fuel, in the charge of a blast furnace.
  7. A fixed quantity of certain commodities.
  8. (obsolete, rare) A birth.
    [] that bore thee at a burden two fair sons.
  9. (medicine) The total amount of toxins, parasites, cancer cells, plaque or similar present in an organism.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

burden (third-person singular simple present burdens, present participle burdening, simple past and past participle burdened)

  1. (transitive) To encumber with a literal or figurative burden.
  2. (transitive) To impose, as a load or burden; to lay or place as a burden (something heavy or objectionable).
Derived terms
  • burden basket
  • burdensome
  • beast of burden
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old French bordon. See bourdon.

Noun

burden (plural burdens)

  1. (music) A phrase or theme that recurs at the end of each verse in a folk song or ballad.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 1 scene 2
      Foot it featly here and there; / And, sweet sprites, the burden bear.
    • 1846, Edgar Allan Poe, The Philosophy of Composition
      As commonly used, the refrain, or burden, not only is limited to lyric verse, but depends for its impression upon the force of monotone - both in sound and thought.
  2. The drone of a bagpipe.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ruddiman to this entry?)
  3. Theme, core idea.

References

Anagrams

  • bunder, burned, unbred

Middle English

Etymology 1

From bord +? -en (adjectival ending)

Adjective

burden

  1. Alternative form of borden

Etymology 2

From burde +? -en (plural ending)

Noun

burden

  1. plural of burde

West Frisian

Noun

burden

  1. plural of burd

burden From the web:

  • what burden means
  • what burdens do you carry
  • what burdens you
  • what burden does jonas have
  • what burden is the mariner relieved of
  • what burdens without weight
  • what burdens do we carry
  • what burden means in spanish

burden in Examples From Wordnik

  • He must bear his burden -- the _burden of detection and of punishment_ -- alone.
  • Indeed, much research on carers of ill people already uses the term burden to describe the ill person's needs in relation to the carer without understanding their relationship and questioning the use of a value laden term.
  • Indeed, much research on carers of ill people already uses the term burden to describe the ill person's needs in relation to the carer without understanding their relationship and questioning the use of a value laden term.
  • Wallace has accepted that the burden is hers; she must care for her son for the rest of her life.
  • Wallace has accepted that the burden is hers; she must care for her son for the rest of her life.
  • Wallace has accepted that the burden is hers; she must care for her son for the rest of her life.
  • Laura Perez Maestro, a 29-year-old journalist at CNN, notes that women are still seen as a burden at work, because of maternity leave which, at 16-weeks, barely warrants the word "burden".
  • I'm sure sending an entire population to another state because Jay thinks they are a burden is the right solution.
  • Right now, the burden is all on the American soldiers.
  • "Then what you call a burden to Mr. Wilks, is only a motive to influence his action?"

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