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different between oafish vs rustic

oafish

English

Etymology

oaf +? -ish

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /?o?f??/

Adjective

oafish (comparative more oafish, superlative most oafish)

  1. Characteristic of or resembling an oaf; clumsy, stupid.

Derived terms

  • oafishness

Translations

oafish From the web:

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oafish in Examples From Wordnik

  • I fear that Dubya will get his testosterone stirred up again and make some kind of oafish, I'm a tough-ass from Crawford remark, like his moronic "Bring it On" dalliance with idiocy.
  • I fear that Dubya will get his testosterone stirred up again and make some kind of oafish, I'm a tough-ass from Crawford remark, like his moronic "Bring it On" dalliance with idiocy.
  • I fear that Dubya will get his testosterone stirred up again and make some kind of oafish, I'm a tough-ass from Crawford remark, like his moronic "Bring it On" dalliance with idiocy.
  • Which is why Obama's paean to Lawrence Summers on Stewart show rang so clangorously, as he praised the oafish Harvard professor for having performed a heckuva job, a phrase that one might have thought would have been permanently exiled from the presidential lexicon.
  • But with the acclaimed actor hiding himself so well in each character — and with other roles so different from the Chance family's lovably oafish patriarch — he's actually pretty hard to pin down.
  • We additionally encounter Launce, a singular of Shakspere's commencement oafish ridiculous characters.
  • We additionally encounter Launce, a singular of Shakspere's commencement oafish ridiculous characters.
  • Which is why Obama's paean to Lawrence Summers on Stewart show rang so clangorously, as he praised the oafish Harvard professor for having performed a heckuva job, a phrase that one might have thought would have been permanently exiled from the presidential lexicon.
  • I saw that from here on, he would become rather an oafish prop, so to speak, in the last act of something like that, without any great stature.
  • I've seen it a hundred times: an oafish fan shamed out of F-bombs by kids sitting with their parents.


rustic

English

Alternative forms

  • (obsolete) rustick, rusticke, rustique

Etymology

From Latin r?sticus. Doublet of roister.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /???st?k/
  • Rhymes: -?st?k

Adjective

rustic (comparative more rustic, superlative most rustic)

  1. Country-styled or pastoral; rural.
    • 1800, William Wordsworth, We are Seven
      She had a rustic, woodland air.
    • late 1700s — Robert Burns, Behold, My Love, How Green the Groves
      The Princely revel may survey
      Our rustic dance wi' scorn.
    • 1818 — Mary Shelley, Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus Ch. I
      With his permission my mother prevailed on her rustic guardians to yield their charge to her. They were fond of the sweet orphan. Her presence had seemed a blessing to them, but it would be unfair to her to keep her in poverty and want when Providence afforded her such powerful protection.
    • 1820 — Washington Irving, Rural Life in England in The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon
      To this mingling of cultivated and rustic society may also be attributed the rural feeling that runs through British literature.
  2. Unfinished or roughly finished.
  3. Crude, rough.
  4. Simple; artless; unaffected.
    • 1704, Alexander Pope, A Discourse on Pastoral Poetry
      the manners not too polite nor too rustic

Derived terms

  • rustic moth
  • rustic work
  • rusticity

Translations

Noun

rustic (plural rustics)

  1. A (sometimes unsophisticated) person from a rural area.
    • 1901, Edmund Selous, Bird Watching, p. 226
      The cause of these stampedes was generally undiscoverable; but sometimes, when the birds stayed some time down on the water, the figure of a rustic would at length appear, walking behind a hedge, along a path bounding the little meadow.
    • 1906, Arthur Conan Doyle, Sir Nigel, Ch IX
      The King looked at the motionless figure, at the little crowd of hushed expectant rustics beyond the bridge, and finally at the face of Chandos, which shone with amusement.
    • 1927-29, Mahatma Gandhi, An Autobiography or The Story of my Experiments with Truth, Part V, The Stain of Indigo, translated 1940 by Mahadev Desai
      Thus this ignorant, unsophisticated but resolute agriculturist captured me. So early in 1917, we left Calcutta for Champaran, looking just like fellow rustics.
  2. A noctuoid moth.
  3. Any of various nymphalid butterflies having brown and orange wings, especially Cupha erymanthis.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Citrus, Curtis, Turcis, citrus, rictus

Romanian

Etymology

From French rustique, from Latin rusticus.

Adjective

rustic m or n (feminine singular rustic?, masculine plural rustici, feminine and neuter plural rustice)

  1. rustic

Declension

rustic From the web:

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rustic in Examples From Wordnik

  • But our ancestors were necessarily limited in their pleasures, and to them Richmond was a God-send, especially to men like Selwyn, or Queensberry, or Walpole, who delighted in social intercourse, and liked to enjoy what they called rustic life with as much comfort as the age provided.
  • But our ancestors were necessarily limited in their pleasures, and to them Richmond was a God-send, especially to men like Selwyn, or Queensberry, or Walpole, who delighted in social intercourse, and liked to enjoy what they called rustic life with as much comfort as the age provided.
  • It was a great annoyance to the British officers and soldiers, to be thus hemmed in by what they termed a rustic rout with calico frocks and fowling-pieces.
  • We don´t mind if lodging is "rustic" and had a lot of fun staying in rustic cabins run by indigenous folks when we visited Yaxchilán and Bonampak in the Lacandon Forest in Chiapas.
  • We don´t mind if lodging is "rustic" and had a lot of fun staying in rustic cabins run by indigenous folks when we visited Yaxchilán and Bonampak in the Lacandon Forest in Chiapas.
  • We don´t mind if lodging is "rustic" and had a lot of fun staying in rustic cabins run by indigenous folks when we visited Yaxchilán and Bonampak in the Lacandon Forest in Chiapas.
  • Crushing throngs of people laid out on the beach under umbrellas or sat in rustic wooden chairs from porches overlooking the river while children swam and played on red swings, all provided by the Tribune.
  • Most of the wineries are family-run affairs where tastings are conducted by appointment in rustic rooms by the owner or a family member.
  • Both towns are known for inexpensive, well-designed furniture in rustic styles.
  • Ill-advised additions had been made, according to the fashion of the times: a den paneled in rustic pine, a long screened porch, some dormers scattered above the horizontal roof line like eyes peering down the drive.

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