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nut

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /n?t/, enPR: n?t
    • (California, General New Zealand, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): [n?t]
  • Rhymes: -?t

Etymology 1

From Middle English nute, note, from Old English hnutu, from Proto-Germanic *hnuts (nut) (compare West Frisian nút, Dutch noot, German Nuss, Danish nød, Swedish nöt, Norwegian nøtt), from Proto-Indo-European *knew- (compare Irish cnó, Latin nux (walnut), Albanian nyç (a gnarl)).

Noun

nut (plural nuts)

  1. A hard-shelled seed.
  2. A piece of metal, usually square or hexagonal in shape, with a hole through it having machined internal threads, intended to be screwed onto a bolt or other threaded shaft.
    Hypernym: fastener
    Hyponyms: acorn nut, barrel nut, square nut, wing nut
    • 1998, Brian Hingley, Furniture Repair & Refinishing - Page 95[1]
      As the bolt tightens into the nut, it pulls the tenon on the side rail into the mortise in the bedpost and locks them together. There are also some European beds that reverse the bolt and nut by setting the nut into the bedpost with the bolt inserted into a slotted area in the side of the rail.
  3. (slang) A crazy person.
    Synonyms: loony, nutbag, nutcase, nutter; see also Thesaurus:mad person
  4. (slang) The head.
    Synonyms: bonce, noodle
  5. (US, slang) Monthly expense to keep a venture running.
  6. (US, slang) The amount of money necessary to set up some venture; set-up costs.
    • 1971, Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Harper Perennial (2005), page 11:
      My attorney was waiting in a bar around the corner. “This won't make the nut,” he said, “unless we have unlimited credit.”
  7. (US, slang) A stash of money owned by an extremely rich investor, sufficient to sustain a high level of consumption if all other money is lost.
  8. (music, lutherie) On stringed instruments such as guitars and violins, the small piece at the peghead end of the fingerboard that holds the strings at the proper spacing and, in most cases, the proper height.
  9. (typography slang) En, a unit of measurement equal to half of the height of the type in use.
  10. (dated, Britain, slang) An extravagantly fashionable young man. [1910s-1920s]
    • 1914, "Saki", ‘The Dreamer’, Beasts and Superbeasts, Penguin 2000 (Complete Short Stories), p. 323:
      ‘You are not going to be what they call a Nut, are you?’ she inquired with some anxiety, partly with the idea that a Nut would be an extravagance which her sister's small household would scarcely be justified in incurring [...].
  11. (vulgar, slang, chiefly plural) A testicle.
    Synonyms: ball, (taboo slang) bollock, nads
  12. (vulgar, slang, uncountable) Semen, ejaculate.
  13. (vulgar, slang, countable) Orgasm, ejaculation; especially release of semen
    • 2020, Dontavious Robinson, Gangster Mission Part One, Page Publishing, Inc (?ISBN)
      [] feelin' her pussy grippin' his dick as her nut lubricated him []
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:nut.
  14. (colloquial) An extreme enthusiast.
  15. (climbing) A shaped piece of metal, threaded by a wire loop, which is jammed in a crack in the rockface and used to protect a climb. (Originally, machine nuts [sense #2] were used for this purpose.)
    • 2005, Tony Lourens, Guide to climbing page 88
      When placing nuts, always look for constrictions within the crack, behind which the nut can be wedged.
  16. (poker, only in attributive use) The best possible hand of a certain type, for instance: "nut straight", "nut flush", and "nut full house". Compare nuts (the best possible hand available).
  17. The tumbler of a gunlock.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  18. (nautical) A projection on each side of the shank of an anchor, to secure the stock in place.
  19. (archaic) A small rounded cake or cookie
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

nut (third-person singular simple present nuts, present participle nutting, simple past and past participle nutted or (nonstandard) nut)

  1. (mostly in the form "nutting") To gather nuts.
  2. (Britain, transitive, slang) To hit deliberately with the head; to headbutt.
    Synonyms: butt, Glasgow kiss, Liverpool kiss, loaf
  3. (slang, mildly vulgar) To orgasm; to ejaculate.
    Synonyms: blow a nut, bust a nut; see also Thesaurus:ejaculate
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:nut.

Etymology 2

Interjection

nut

  1. (Scotland, colloquial) No.
    • 1995, Alan Warner, Morvern Callar, Vintage 2015, p. 26:
      Did you like them boys? I goes.
      Nut. She shook her hair.
      Neither?
      Nut. Right townies.

Anagrams

  • NTU, Tun, tun

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [n??t]

Noun

nut (plural [please provide])

  1. use, benefit

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Dutch

Etymology

From the adjective Middle Dutch nutte (useful), or from Middle Dutch nut (yield), from Old Dutch *nut, from Proto-Germanic *nutj?, *nutj? (profit, yield, utility), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- (to seize; grasp; use).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /n?t/
  • Hyphenation: nut
  • Rhymes: -?t

Noun

nut n (uncountable)

  1. use, point, utility, sense
    Synonym: zin
  2. benefit
    Synonym: voordeel

Derived terms

  • Nutsman
  • nuttig
  • nutteloos

Adjective

nut (comparative nutter, superlative nutst)

  1. (obsolete) useful
    Synonym: nuttig

Inflection

Derived terms

  • onnut

Middle English

Adverb

nut

  1. Alternative form of not

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse hnútr.

Noun

nut m (definite singular nuten, indefinite plural nuter, definite plural nutene)

  1. a tall, rounded mountain top

References

  • “nut” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse hnútr.

Noun

nut m (definite singular nuten, indefinite plural nutar, definite plural nutane)

  1. a tall, rounded mountain top

References

  • “nut” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Swedish

Alternative forms

  • not

Etymology

From Old Norse hnot, from Proto-Germanic *hnuts.

Noun

nut f

  1. nut

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: nöt

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nut/

Noun

nut f

  1. genitive plural of nuta

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /n??/

Interjection

nut

  1. (South Scots) no; used to show disagreement or negation.

Unua

Noun

nut

  1. Alternative form of naut

Further reading

  • Elizabeth Pearce, A Grammar of Unua (2015)

nut From the web:

  • what nuts can dogs eat
  • what nutrients are in corn
  • what nuts are bad for dogs
  • what nutrients are in eggs
  • what nuts are keto
  • what nuts are good for diabetics
  • what nutrients are in potatoes
  • what nuts are not tree nuts

nut in Examples From Wordnik

  • Where in the story did it say the nut is a teabagger anyway?
  • Legion thinks the nut is a hero and is true to the beliefs of the tea bag movement.
  • He talked more about what I call nut control, instead of gun control.
  • From the first, the English word nut meant an edible seed surrounded by a hard shell, and this remains the common meaning.
  • From the first, the English word nut meant an edible seed surrounded by a hard shell, and this remains the common meaning.
  • In this connection I desire to make a statement which may come as a surprise to many, and that is this: I have but lately -- within the past few days, in fact -- been informed that among persons addicted to the vice of slang the term nut is occasionally applied to other persons whom they suspect of being mentally incapable or, in short, deranged.
  • If Ebenezer had a special weakness it was for doughnuts, which he called nut-cakes.
  • If you are a label nut, rather than making up a toy classification system on your own, ask your kids how they would like to see their toys categorized.
  • A lot of shows are [also] afraid of detail because it takes a little more work but for us the magic of the show is in the details - the hot dog in the holding cell or the fact that you go into a victim's apartment and he's a label nut and he's labeled everything and there's an onion on the table that has a label on it that says 'onion.'
  • If I may be blunt, here is what we call the nut graph of this post:


freak

English

Alternative forms

  • freake (obsolete)
  • freik, freke, frick (Scotland)

Etymology 1

1560, "sudden change of mind, whim", of uncertain origin. Probably from a dialectal word related to Middle English frekynge (capricious behaviour; whims) and Middle English friken, frikien (to move briskly or nimbly), from Old English frician (to leap, dance), or Middle English frek (insolent, daring), from Old English frec (desirous, greedy, eager, bold, daring), from Proto-Germanic *frekaz, *frakaz (hard, efficient, greedy, bold, audacious) (in which case, it would be related to the noun under Etymology 2). Compare Old High German freh (eager), Old English fr?cne (dangerous, daring, courageous, bold).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fr?k, IPA(key): /f?i?k/
  • Rhymes: -i?k

Noun

freak (plural freaks)

  1. A sudden change of mind
    Synonyms: whim, vagary, caprice, fancy; see also Thesaurus:whim
  2. Someone or something that is markedly unusual or unpredictable.
    Synonyms: anomaly, outlier; see also Thesaurus:anomaly
  3. A hippie.
    Synonyms: longhair, treehugger
  4. A drug addict.
    Synonyms: druggie, user; see also Thesaurus:addict
  5. (of a person) A nonconformist, especially in appearance, social behavior, sexual orientation, gender identity, and/or business practices; an oddball, especially in physiology (e.g., "circus freak"); unique, sometimes in a displeasing way.
    Synonyms: odd duck, weirdo; see also Thesaurus:strange person, Thesaurus:maverick
  6. (bodybuilding) A person whose physique has grown far beyond the normal limits of muscular development; often a bodybuilder weighing more than 260 pounds (117.934 kilos).
  7. An enthusiast, or person who has an obsession with, or extreme knowledge of, something.
    Synonyms: fanatic, geek; see also Thesaurus:fan
  8. (informal, sometimes endearing) A very sexually perverse individual.
    Synonyms: horn dog, hypersexual, pervert; see also Thesaurus:libidinist
  9. (dated) A streak of colour; variegation.
    Synonyms: (birds) superciliary, vein
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

freak (third-person singular simple present freaks, present participle freaking, simple past and past participle freaked)

  1. (intransitive) To react extremely or irrationally, usually under distress or discomposure.
    • 1994, James Earl Hardy, B-Boy Blues: A Seriously Sexy, Fiercely Funny, Black-On-Black Love Story, (Alyson Publishing), page 107
      But after one night turned into five days, I was freaking out. I missed him.
  2. (transitive) To make greatly distressed and/or a discomposed appearance.
  3. (slang, transitive, intransitive) To be placed or place someone under the influence of a psychedelic drug, (especially) to experience reality withdrawal, or hallucinations (nightmarish), to behave irrational or unconventional due to drug use.
  4. (transitive, dated) To streak; to variegate
    • 1930, Robert Seymour Bridges, The Testament of Beauty: A Poem in Four Books, (Literary Criticism), page 20
      [] in fine diaper of silver and mother-of-pearl freaking the intense azure; Now scurrying close overhead, wild ink-hued random racers that fling sheeted []
Derived terms
  • freak out
Translations

Adjective

freak (not comparable)

  1. Strange, weird, unexpected.
    Synonyms: freakish; see also Thesaurus:strange, Thesaurus:lucky

Derived terms

  • freak accident
Translations

Further reading

  • freak in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • freak in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Etymology 2

From Middle English freke, freike (a bold man, warrior, man, creature), from Old English freca (a bold man, warrior, hero), from Proto-Germanic *frekô (an active or eager man, warrior, wolf), from *frekaz (active, bold, desirous, greedy), from Proto-Indo-European *pereg-, *spereg- (to shrug, be quick, twitch, splash, blast). Cognate with Old Norse freki (greedy or avaricious one, a wolf), Old High German freh (eager), German frech, Old English fr?cne (dangerous, daring, courageous, bold).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: fr?k, IPA(key): /f?i?k/
  • Rhymes: -i?k

Noun

freak (plural freaks)

  1. A man, particularly a bold, strong, vigorous man.
  2. (Britain dialectal, Scotland) A fellow; a petulant young man.

Anagrams

  • Kafer, faker

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English freak.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /frik/, /fri?k/
  • Hyphenation: freak
  • Rhymes: -ik

Noun

freak m (plural freaks, diminutive freakje n)

  1. freak (oddball)
  2. freak (dedicated fan)

freak From the web:

  • what freaky means
  • what freaky
  • what freak means
  • what freak show character am i
  • what freaky questions to ask
  • what freak call tony d
  • what freaks you out
  • what freak out means

freak in Examples From Wordnik

  • If Mr. Webster had decided to put the word freak in his dictionary, Anna Fitzgerald would be the best definition he could give.
  • Greg, I think the term freak show is apropos because of the first definition of the word here:
  • You see, the frequency used by him and in what we call freak bombs, acts first on brain and nerve cells.
  • You see, the frequency used by him and in what we call freak bombs, acts first on brain and nerve cells.
  • We talked to a spokesman for the balloon company, expressed his regrets of course, and says they're trying to determine what caused what he calls a freak fire.
  • Withdrawal now? withdrawal later? troop expansion? what? what the freak is your positionh?
  • We talked to a spokesman for the balloon company, expressed his regrets of course, and says they're trying to determine what caused what he calls a freak fire.
  • He expressed his regret and says they are trying to determine exactly what caused what he called a freak fire.
  • SF - Larry Fitzgerald WR Arizona - Fitz is what we call a freak of an athlete.
  • And not the kind of freak show where everybody's trying to be a freak, but the kind where people really are really freaky and are usually trying their darnedest to seem normal, and when you meet them you might think for about five seconds that they're actually normal, but then they inadvertently let there freak flag fly, and you suddenly realize, "Wow, this person is a freakin 'freak!"

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