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introduction

English

Etymology

From Middle English introduccioun, introduccyon, borrowed from Old French introduction, itself a borrowing from Latin intr?d?cti?nem, accusative of Latin intr?d?cti?, from intr?d?c?.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /??nt???d?k??n/
  • Rhymes: -?k??n
  • Hyphenation: in?tro?duc?tion

Noun

introduction (countable and uncountable, plural introductions)

  1. The act or process of introducing.
    the introduction of a new product into the market
  2. A means, such as a personal letter, of presenting one person to another.
  3. An initial section of a book or article, which introduces the subject material.
  4. A written or oral explanation of what constitutes the basis of an issue.

Synonyms

  • (initial section of a written work): preface, isagoge, lead-in, lead, lede; see also Thesaurus:foreword

Derived terms

  • introduction agency
  • introductory

Translations


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin introductio, introductionem, from introductus, from introduco.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /??.t??.dyk.sj??/

Noun

introduction f (plural introductions)

  1. introduction

Related terms

  • introduire

Further reading

  • “introduction” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

introduction From the web:

  • what introduction mean
  • what introduction paragraph
  • what introduction in an essay
  • what introductions do for songs
  • what introduction twice always say
  • what introduction to business
  • what introduction in research
  • what introduction should contain

introduction in Examples From Wordnik

  • But were he to introduce me to one, and give me an opportunity of shaking hands with him, of conversing with him, of observing his features, etc.; and were he then to introduce me to another, in like manner, with the privilege of shaking hands again with the first, before my introduction to the third; and were he thus to introduce me to them all successively, I might form _twenty-six acquaintances with one introduction_.
  • Taylor may be best known for creating the images used for the title introduction sequence of the television series "Ghost Whisperer."
  • If you want to read the Nicci French posts from last week, the introduction is here: you can just scroll ahead from there until you get to Barbara Fiser (and carry on reading, actually, her first post today, A blogging librarian who kills people in her spare time, is engaging).
  • The worst was when one sect (INAUDIBLE) rose up against what they called the introduction of western education and nearly 1,000 people died.
  • The worst was when one sect Boko Haram, rose up against what they called the introduction of Western education and nearly 1,000 people died.
  • If you want to read the Nicci French posts from last week, the introduction is here: you can just scroll ahead from there until you get to Barbara Fiser (and carry on reading, actually, her first post today, A blogging librarian who kills people in her spare time, is engaging).
  • If you want to read the Nicci French posts from last week, the introduction is here: you can just scroll ahead from there until you get to Barbara Fiser (and carry on reading, actually, her first post today, A blogging librarian who kills people in her spare time, is engaging).
  • The worst was when one sect (INAUDIBLE) rose up against what they called the introduction of western education and nearly 1,000 people died.
  • If you want to read the Nicci French posts from last week, the introduction is here: you can just scroll ahead from there until you get to Barbara Fiser (and carry on reading, actually, her first post today, A blogging librarian who kills people in her spare time, is engaging).
  • The biggest was a 1,000 people killed, when a group, and Islamic sect, Boko Haram (ph) rose up and against what they called the introduction of Western education into the region.


precursor

English

Alternative forms

  • præcursor (chiefly obsolete)

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin praecursor (forerunner).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /?p?i??k??.s??/, /p???k??.s??/

Noun

precursor (plural precursors)

  1. That which precurses: a forerunner, predecessor, or indicator of approaching events.
  2. (chemistry) One of the compounds that participates in the chemical reaction that produces another compound.

Related terms

  • cursor

Derived terms

  • precursory

Translations

Adjective

precursor (not comparable)

  1. (telecommunications, of intersymbol interference) Caused by the following symbol.

Antonyms

  • postcursor

See also

  • ISI

References

  • precursor at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • precursor in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Intersymbol interference on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • procurers

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin praecuror, praecursorem.

Adjective

precursor (feminine precursora, masculine plural precursors, feminine plural precursores)

  1. precursory, preceding

Noun

precursor m (plural precursors, feminine precursora)

  1. precursor

Further reading

  • “precursor” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “precursor” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “precursor” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “precursor” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

From Latin praecursor

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pre?k?rs?r/

Noun

precursor m (plural precursors, diminutive precursortje n)

  1. precursor, forerunner

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin praecuror, praecursorem.

Noun

precursor m (plural precursores, feminine precursora, feminine plural precursoras)

  1. precursor; forerunner (something that led to the development of another)

Related terms

  • cursor

Adjective

precursor m (feminine singular precursora, masculine plural precursores, feminine plural precursoras, comparable)

  1. precursory (pertaining to events that will follow)

Further reading

  • “precursor” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian

Etymology

From French précurseur.

Noun

precursor m (plural precursori)

  1. precursor

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin praecuror, praecursorem.

Adjective

precursor (feminine precursora, masculine plural precursores, feminine plural precursoras)

  1. precursory, preceding

Noun

precursor m (plural precursores, feminine precursora, feminine plural precursoras)

  1. precursor, forerunner

Related terms

  • cursor

Further reading

  • “precursor” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

precursor From the web:

  • what precursor means
  • what precursor to the eu formed in 1957
  • what does a precursor mean
  • precursors define

precursor in Examples From Wordnik

  • Yet in precisely this jostling of succession, that wintry decline and fall of the precursor is already redeemed by the previous linear drop, despite the attempted brake of the exclamation mark.
  • Then up, straight up, the deviation of a fraction of an inch being a certain precursor of disaster, the snowshoe must be lifted till the surface is cleared; then forward, down, and the other foot is raised perpendicularly for the matter of half a yard.
  • Then up, straight up, the deviation of a fraction of an inch being a certain precursor of disaster, the snowshoe must be lifted till the surface is cleared; then forward, down, and the other foot is raised perpendicularly for the matter of half a yard.
  • For instance if certain precursor components are too large, too small, too weak, have too much torque, don't fit well with others, then you can't just tweak it for a fix.
  • In all this, the great precursor is the strongly drawn King Dahfu in Henderson the Rain King, who makes splendid use of his secondhand English when addressing his massive and worried American guest as follows:
  • In all this, the great precursor is the strongly drawn King Dahfu in Henderson the Rain King, who makes splendid use of his secondhand English when addressing his massive and worried American guest as follows:
  • In all this, the great precursor is the strongly drawn King Dahfu in Henderson the Rain King, who makes splendid use of his secondhand English when addressing his massive and worried American guest as follows:
  • Requirements relating to the largest exporting and importing countries of certain precursor chemicals.
  • Then up, straight up, the deviation of a fraction of an inch being a certain precursor of disaster, the snowshoe must be lifted till the surface is cleared; then forward, down, and the other foot is raised perpendicularly for the matter of half a yard.
  • One bit of junk can be especially troubling - a tiny, soluble molecule he describes as a precursor to amyloid beta, a protein fragment and the notorious sticky building-block of brain plaques.

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