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inform

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /?n?f??m/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?n?f??m/
  • Rhymes: -??(?)m

Etymology 1

From Middle English informen, enformen, borrowed from Old French enformer, informer (to train, instruct, inform), from Latin ?nf?rm? (to shape, form, train, instruct, educate), from in- (into) + f?rma (form, shape), equivalent to in- +? form.

Alternative forms

  • enform (obsolete)

Verb

inform (third-person singular simple present informs, present participle informing, simple past and past participle informed)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To instruct, train (usually in matters of knowledge).
  2. (transitive) To communicate knowledge to.
    • For he would learn their business secretly, / And then inform his master hastily.
  3. (intransitive) To impart information or knowledge.
  4. To act as an informer; denounce.
  5. (transitive) To give form or character to; to inspire (with a given quality); to affect, influence (with a pervading principle, idea etc.).
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To make known, wisely and/or knowledgeably.
  7. (obsolete, transitive) To direct, guide.
  8. (archaic, intransitive) To take form; to become visible or manifest; to appear.
Synonyms
  • (communicate knowledge to (trans.)): acquaint, apprise, notify; See also Thesaurus:inform
  • (act as informer): dob, name names, peach, snitch; See also Thesaurus:rat out
  • (take form): materialize, take shape; See also Thesaurus:come into being
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

Latin ?nf?rmis

Adjective

inform (not comparable)

  1. Without regular form; shapeless; ugly; deformed.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cotton to this entry?) "Bleak Crags, and naked Hills, And the whole Prospect so inform and rude." (C. Cotton, Wonders of Peake in Poetical Works (1765) 342)

Anagrams

  • -formin, F minor, Morfin, formin

Romanian

Etymology

From French informe, from Latin informis.

Adjective

inform m or n (feminine singular inform?, masculine plural informi, feminine and neuter plural informe)

  1. deformed

Declension

inform From the web:

  • what information
  • what information is indexed by the graph
  • what information is published in the congressional record
  • what information does an sds contain
  • what information does a molecular formula provide
  • what information is indexed by the graph coinbase
  • what information is on a sim card
  • what information is needed for a wire transfer

inform in Examples From Wordnik

  • But, did he inform is his bosses that he had rented out his house in Yangon to this company at a crazy ly high rent and taken money under the table too.
  • A inform from a collision scene, in a meantime, can be see!
  • A inform from a collision scene, in a meantime, can be see!
  • My favorite quote about the reason to inform is from Lady Murasaki's The Tale of Genji: Again and again, something in one's own life or around one will seem so important that one cannot bear for it to pass into oblivion.
  • "To once again inform you that Neodarwinism is not evolution (a finger-moon confusion) would do no good."
  • To once again inform you that Neodarwinism is not evolution (a finger-moon confusion) would do no good.
  • Can any of your readers inform me what is the Armenian word for _apricot_, and whether there is any reason to believe that the Arabic words for
  • Authorities around the world, in short, inform us that professors don't come smarter or wiser than Mazrui.
  • The former seeks to "inform" - Jefferson's word-the reasoning within an assembly's walls.
  • The opening titles inform us that no one story is totally the truth, and everything can be seen and told differently, and so we see the opening, and the closing, of the two films using split screen and multiple views of the moments leading to the possible end of Mesrine's life.


affirm

English

Etymology

From Middle English affirmen, affermen, from Old French afermer, affermer, from Latin affirmare, adfirmare (to present as fixed, aver, affirm), from ad (to) + firmare (to make firm), from firmus (firm).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /??f?m/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /??f??m/
  • Rhymes: -??(?)m

Verb

affirm (third-person singular simple present affirms, present participle affirming, simple past and past participle affirmed)

  1. To agree, verify or concur; to answer positively.
    She affirmed that she would go when I asked her.
  2. To assert positively; to tell with confidence; to aver; to maintain as true.
  3. To support or encourage.
    They did everything they could to affirm the children's self-confidence.
  4. To make firm; to confirm, or ratify; especially (law) to assert or confirm, as a judgment, decree, or order, brought before an appellate court for review.

Synonyms

  • validate

Antonyms

  • disaffirm
  • deny (of 1,2)
  • repudiate (of 2)
  • invalidate (of 4)

Related terms

  • affirmation
  • affirmative

Translations

See also

  • affirmative action
  • confirm

Further reading

  • affirm in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • affirm in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • affirm at OneLook Dictionary Search

affirm From the web:

  • what affirmative action
  • what affirmations
  • what affirmation means
  • what affirmations should i use
  • what affirmed the legality of racial segregation
  • what affirmations should i use for shifting
  • what affirmative defenses must be pled
  • what affirmative action means

affirm in Examples From Wordnik

  • The sun does not more certainly shine in the heavens, than that which I now affirm is true.
  • The sun does not more certainly shine in the heavens, than that which I now affirm is true.
  • Christ came into existence before Abraham did (as Arians affirm is the meaning), but that He never came into being at all, but existed before
  • The sun does not more certainly shine in the heavens, than that which I now affirm is true (30). [
  • Against this view it can hardly be thought to militate that the Batak does not in set terms affirm his external soul to be in his totem, but alleges other grounds for respecting the sacred animal or plant of his clan.
  • Against this view it can hardly be thought to militate that the Batak does not in set terms affirm his external soul to be in his totem, but alleges other grounds for respecting the sacred animal or plant of his clan.
  • Batak does not in set terms affirm his external soul to be in his totem, but alleges other grounds for respecting the sacred animal or plant of his clan.
  • For to affirm is to determine; now, every determination, to be true, must be reached empirically.
  • Philologists of yet greater name affirm that it was meant to designate _pre-eminence_, and therefore ought to be written _ante_, before, from the Latin, a language now pretty well forgotten, though the authors who wrote in it are still preserved in French translations.
  • What pure Christianity is, divested of all its ornaments, appendages, and corruption, I pretend not to say; but what it is not, I will venture to affirm, which is, that it is not the offspring of fraud or fiction: such, on

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