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exclusive

English

Etymology

From Latin excl?s?vus, from excludere (to shut out, exclude), from ex- (out) + variant form of verb claudere (to close, shut).

Pronunciation

  • (General American, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?k?sklu.s?v/, /?k?sklu.z?v/
  • Hyphenation: ex?clu?sive

Adjective

exclusive (comparative more exclusive, superlative most exclusive)

  1. (literally) Excluding items or members that do not meet certain conditions.
  2. (figuratively) Referring to a membership organisation, service or product: of high quality and/or renown, for superior members only. A snobbish usage, suggesting that members who do not meet requirements, which may be financial, of celebrity, religion, skin colour etc., are excluded.
    Exclusive clubs tend to serve exclusive brands of food and drinks, in the same exorbitant price range, such as the 'finest' French châteaux.
  3. Exclusionary.
  4. Whole, undivided, entire.
    The teacher's pet commands the teacher's exclusive attention.
  5. (linguistics) Of or relating to the first-person plural pronoun when excluding the person being addressed.
    The pronoun in "We're going to a party later, but you aren't invited" is an exclusive "we".
  6. (of two people in a romantic or sexual relationship) Having a romantic or sexual relationship with one another, to the exclusion of others.
    They decided to no longer be exclusive.

Antonyms

  • inclusive
  • non-exclusive

Derived terms

Related terms

  • excludent (discrimination)

Translations

Noun

exclusive (plural exclusives)

  1. Information (or an artefact) that is granted or obtained exclusively.
    The editor agreed to keep a lid on a potentially disastrous political scoop in exchange for an exclusive of a happier nature.
  2. A member of a group who exclude others from their society.
  3. (grammar) A word or phrase that restricts something, such as only, solely, or simply.

Translations

Further reading

  • exclusive in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • exclusive in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Adjective

exclusive

  1. feminine singular of exclusif

Latin

Adjective

excl?s?ve

  1. vocative masculine singular of excl?s?vus

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exclusive in Examples From Wordnik

  • Whether it was an individual, a community, a district, or a nation, that in this way acquired an exclusive right of ownership of the land, was immaterial: it was necessarily an _exclusive_ right, otherwise no one would put any labour into the land.
  • The word exclusive suddenly rang alarm bells in my head.
  • UNCLOS, some states (e.g. the United Kingdom) have chosen not to claim an EEZ, but rather to claim jurisdiction over the living resources off their coast; in such cases, the term exclusive fishing zone is often used; the breadth of this zone is normally the same as the EEZ or 200 nautical miles
  • This comes as the day after North Korean TV showed what it calls exclusive footage of the reclusive leader, Kim Jong-Il.
  • On the basis of what it calls exclusive research, it warns that the insurgency is also exercising a "significant amount of psychological control, gaining more and more political legitimacy in the minds of the Afghan people who have a long history of shifting alliances and regime change".
  • It turns out the Iranian TV, Al-Alam, is releasing now what they calling exclusive footage of "a confession."
  • He said like other members of the coalition, the Bafokeng supreme council rejected the granting of what he described as the exclusive powers to the municipalities.
  • You know how silly I think the TV overuse of the word "exclusive" and that thus I have not uttered it on air for about 5 years - but now I have a new one: "take a listen."
  • And the word "exclusive" is key to the deal: if content currently available on Hulu is available for licensing to every Internet company with a video offering-Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and many more-the value of Hulu really comes down to its established streaming and player technology, plus its existing user and subscriber base.
  • Clonbrony had offended half, nay, three quarters of her guests, by what they termed her exclusive attention to those very leaders of the ton, from whom she had suffered so much, and who had made it obvious to all that they thought they did her too much honour in appearing at her gala.


irregular

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French irreguler, from Medieval Latin or Late Latin irr?gul?ris, from in- + regularis, equivalent to ir- +? regular.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /?????j?l?/

Adjective

irregular (comparative more irregular, superlative most irregular)

  1. nonstandard; not conforming to rules or expectations
  2. (of a surface) rough
  3. without symmetry, regularity, or uniformity
  4. (geometry, of a polygon) not regular; having sides that are not equal or angles that are not equal
  5. (geometry, of a polyhedron) whose faces are not all regular polygons (or are not equally inclined to each other)
  6. (grammar, of a word) not following the regular or expected patterns of inflection in a given language

Synonyms

  • (nonstandard): abnormal, singular; see also Thesaurus:strange
  • (rough): coarse, salebrous; see also Thesaurus:rough
  • (without uniformity): unstable, unsteady; see also Thesaurus:unsteady
  • (not following the regular patterns of inflection): heteroclite

Antonyms

  • regular

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

irregular (plural irregulars)

  1. A soldier who is not a member of an official military force and who may not use regular army tactics.
  2. One who does not regularly attend a venue.

Translations


Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin irr?gul?ris.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /i.r?.?u?la/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /i.re.?u?la?/

Adjective

irregular (masculine and feminine plural irregulars)

  1. irregular
    Antonym: regular

Derived terms

  • irregularment

Related terms

  • irregularitat

Further reading

  • “irregular” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “irregular” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “irregular” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “irregular” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Galician

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin irr?gul?ris.

Adjective

irregular m or f (plural irregulares)

  1. irregular
    Antonym: regular

Related terms

  • irregularidade

Further reading

  • “irregular” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin irr?gul?ris.

Adjective

irregular m or f (plural irregulares, comparable)

  1. irregular; nonstandard
  2. (grammar) irregular (not following an inflectional paradigm)

Antonyms

  • regular

Derived terms

  • irregularmente

Related terms

  • irregularidade

Further reading

  • “irregular” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin irr?gul?ris.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ire?u?la?/, [i.re.??u?la?]

Adjective

irregular (plural irregulares)

  1. irregular, uneven, erratic, haphazard
  2. patchy, spotty, jagged, ragged
  3. fitful
  4. (grammar) (of a verb etc.) irregular
    Antonym: regular

Derived terms

  • verbo irregular

Related terms

  • irregularidad
  • regular

Further reading

  • “irregular” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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irregular in Examples From Wordnik

  • After a preliminary sniff she embarked upon a rapid lecture on what she called my irregular and untidy habits.
  • He did not think his soul lost by going to bed at dawn, for he liked to write at night; or by doing other things at what she called irregular hours; and he must have been at least astonished on hearing himself asked, three weeks after marriage, _when he intended giving up his versifying habits_?
  • The agency said Taylor Bean failed to disclose what it called irregular transactions that raised concerns of fraud.
  • Insurgents understand that political will is the critical vulnerability of the United States in irregular warfare.
  • A new Law of Migration Amnesty has been sanctioned by President Lula da Silva, allowing foreigners in irregular situations to apply for temporary residence permits and ultimately gain legal status in Brazil.
  • Insurgents understand that political will is the critical vulnerability of the United States in irregular warfare.
  • Insurgents understand that political will is the critical vulnerability of the United States in irregular warfare.
  • The smoke continued to flow, in irregular puffs, until eventually the room was filled with haze.
  • Insurgents understand that political will is the critical vulnerability of the United States in irregular warfare.
  • Here and there, in irregular patches where the steep and the soil favored, wine grapes were growing.

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