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eager

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /?i??/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?i???/
  • Rhymes: -i???(?)

Etymology 1

From Middle English egre, eger, from Old French egre (French aigre), from Latin acer (sharp, keen); see acid, acerb, etc. Compare vinegar, alegar.

Alternative forms

  • aigre (obsolete)
  • eagre (obsolete)

Adjective

eager (comparative more eager, superlative most eager)

  1. Desirous; keen to do or obtain something.
    • 1887, John Keble, s:The Christian Year
      When to her eager lips is brought / Her infant's thrilling kiss.
    • a crowd of eager and curious schoolboys
  2. (computing theory) Not employing lazy evaluation; calculating results immediately, rather than deferring calculation until they are required.
    an eager algorithm
  3. (dated) Brittle; inflexible; not ductile.
    • gold itself will be sometimes so eager, (as artists call it), that it will as little endure the hammer as glass itself
  4. (obsolete) Sharp; sour; acid.
  5. (obsolete) Sharp; keen; bitter; severe.
Synonyms
  • keen
  • raring
  • fain (archaic)
Derived terms
  • eager beaver
  • eagerly
  • eagerness
Translations

Etymology 2

See eagre.

Noun

eager (plural eagers)

  1. Alternative form of eagre (tidal bore).

Further reading

  • eager in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • eager in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • eager at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • aeger, agree, eagre, geare, æger

eager From the web:

  • what eager means
  • what eagerness to clear yourselves
  • what eager beaver means
  • what eager to learn mean
  • what eager mean in spanish
  • what eager to please mean
  • what eager eyes
  • what eagerly anticipated mean

eager in Examples From Wordnik

  • Maeve had heard little past the word eager and then Lisa asking if they could leave early if they were finished.
  • Maeve had heard little past the word eager and then Lisa asking if they could leave early if they were finished.
  • Right wingers on the board again eager to turn America's children in to hamburger without so much as a thought.
  • "Under such circumstances, investors will likely remain eager to buy long-term JGBs for an extended period and the yields could extend declines," he added.
  • Only a certain eager alertness showed the delight he took in her presence.
  • As a one-time chimp fondler myself, I started scratching under my arms and wolfing down bananas in eager anticipation of the DWTS results show (an unprecedented display of enthusiasm!).
  • If you are in eager to relieve yourself but fail to find a toilet in Wuhan, Hubei, you can ask a special toilet guide to show you the way, the Changjiang Commercial News reported.
  • So eager is the country to accommodate Mr. Bush that Parliament unanimously approved a bill last month allowing “American forces to engage in any kind of operation, including the use of force, in order to provide security for the president.”
  • Plucky Anna bounces back from her ordeal the next morning, so eager is she to get a Van Gogh back to the nice lady who deserves it, but a Romanian tycoon dispatches a tiny hit woman to steal the painting away.
  • Plucky Anna bounces back from her ordeal the next morning, so eager is she to get a Van Gogh back to the nice lady who deserves it, but a Romanian tycoon dispatches a tiny hit woman to steal the painting away.


will

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /w?l/, [w??]
  • Rhymes: -?l

Etymology 1

From Middle English willen, wullen, wollen, from Old English willan (to want), from Proto-West Germanic *willjan, from Proto-Germanic *wiljan?, from Proto-Indo-European *welh?- (to choose, wish).

Cognate with Dutch willen, Low German willen, German wollen, Swedish and Norwegian Nynorsk vilja, Norwegian Bokmål ville, Latin velle (wish, verb) and Albanian vel (to satisfy, be stuffed). The verb is not always distinguishable from Etymology 3, below.

Alternative forms

  • vill, weel (pronunciation spelling)
  • wil, wille, woll, wyll (obsolete)

Verb

will (third-person singular simple present will, present participle willing, simple past would, no past participle)

  1. (now uncommon or literary, transitive) To wish, desire (something). [chiefly 9th-19th c.]
    • And behold, there came a leper and worshipped him, saying, Lord if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean.
    • 1944, FJ Sheed, translating St. Augustine, Confessions:
      Grant what Thou dost command, and command what Thou wilt.
  2. (now rare, intransitive) To wish or desire (that something happen); to intend (that). [9th-19th c.]
    • c. 1450, The Macro Plays:
      If thou wilt fare well at meat and meal, come and follow me.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew XXVI:
      the disciples cam to Jesus sayinge unto hym: where wylt thou that we prepare for the to eate the ester lambe?
    • see God's goodwill toward men, hear how generally his grace is proposed, to him, and him, and them, each man in particular, and to all. 1 Tim. ii. 4. "God will that all men be saved, and come to the knowledge of the truth."
  3. (auxiliary) To habitually do (a given action). [from 9th c.]
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, page 28:
      As young men will, I did my best to appear suave and sophisticated.
    • 2009, Stephen Bayley, The Telegraph, 24 Sep 09:
      How telling is it that many women will volunteer for temporary disablement by wearing high heeled shoes that hobble them?
    • 2011, "Connubial bliss in America", The Economist:
      So far neither side has scored a decisive victory, though each will occasionally claim one.
  4. (auxiliary) To choose to (do something); used to express intention but without any temporal connotations (+ bare infinitive), often in questions and negation. [from 10th c.]
  5. (auxiliary) Used to express the future tense, sometimes with some implication of volition when used in the first person. Compare shall. [from 10th c.]
    • 1602, William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, or What You Will, act IV:
      Good fool, as ever thou wilt deserve well at my hand, help me to a candle, and pen, ink and paper : as I am a gentleman, I will live to be thankful to thee for’t.
    • 1845, Alexandre Dumas, The Count of Monte Cristo, chapter LXXIII:
      “I will go to you, and we will fly; but from this moment until then, let us not tempt Providence, let us not see each other. It is a miracle, it is a providence that we have not been discovered. If we were surprised, if it were known that we met thus, we should have no further resource.”
  6. (auxiliary) To be able to, to have the capacity to. [from 14th c.]
  7. (auxiliary) Expressing a present tense with some conditional or subjective weakening: "will turn out to", "must by inference". [from 15th c.]
    • 2007, Edward Jesko, The Polish:
      “That will be five zloty.” I reached into my pocket and came up with some coins.
    • 2012, Penny Freedman, All The Daughters:
      Unless she diverted on the ten minute walk home, she’ll have got home at about half past.
  8. (archaic) To go.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, Macbeth
      I’ll to England.
Usage notes
  • Historically, will was used in the simple future sense only in the second and third person, while shall was used in the first person. Today, that distinction is almost entirely lost, and the verb takes the same form in all persons and both numbers. Similarly, in the intent sense, will was historically used with the second and third person, while shall was reserved for the first person.
  • The present tense is will and the past tense is would. Early Modern English had a past participle would which is now obsolete.
    Malory: ‘Many tymes he myghte haue had her and he had wold’. John Done: ‘If hee had would, hee might easily [...] occupied the Monarchy.’
  • Formerly, will could be used elliptically for "will go" — e.g. "I'll to her lodgings" (Marlowe).
  • See the usage note at shall.
  • The present participle does not apply to the uses of will as an auxiliary verb.
  • The form of will with the enclitic -n’t (or the present tense negative form of will in the analysis in which -n’t is an inflectional suffix) is won’t (will not) (rather than the form that would be expected based on a regular application of -n't, willn’t), while the corresponding form of the past tense would is wouldn’t.
Translations
See also
  • Appendix:English modal verbs
  • Appendix:English tag questions

Etymology 2

From Middle English wille, from Old English willa (mind, will, determination, purpose, desire, wish, request, joy, delight, pleasure) (compare verb willian), from Proto-Germanic *wiljô (desire, will), from Proto-Indo-European *welh?- (to choose, wish). Cognate with Dutch wil, German Wille, Swedish vilja, Norwegian vilje.

Alternative forms

  • wille (obsolete)

Noun

will (plural wills)

  1. One's independent faculty of choice; the ability to be able to exercise one's choice or intention. [from 9th c.]
  2. One's intention or decision; someone's orders or commands. [from 9th c.]
  3. The act of choosing to do something; a person’s conscious intent or volition. [from 10th c.]
  4. (law): A formal declaration of one's intent concerning the disposal of one's property and holdings after death; the legal document stating such wishes. [from 14th c.]
  5. (archaic) That which is desired; one's wish. [from 10th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.ii:
      I auow by this most sacred head / Of my deare foster child, to ease thy griefe, / And win thy will [...].
  6. (archaic) Desire, longing. (Now generally merged with later senses.) [from 9th c.]
Usage notes
  • For example a strong will, free will, or independent will.
Synonyms
  • (law): last will, last will and testament, testament
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English willen, from Old English willian (to will), from Proto-West Germanic *willj?n (to will), from Proto-Indo-European *welh?- (to choose, wish). Cognate with German Low German willen, German willen. The verb is not always distinguishable from Etymology 1, above.

Verb

will (third-person singular simple present wills, present participle willing, simple past and past participle willed or (rare) would)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To instruct (that something be done) in one's will. [from 9th c.]
  2. (transitive) To bequeath (something) to someone in one's will (legal document). [from 15th c.]
  3. (transitive) To exert one's force of will (intention) in order to compel, or attempt to compel, something to happen or someone to do something. [from 10th c.]
    • Send for music, / And will the cooks to use their best of cunning / To please the palate.
Synonyms
  • (bequeath): bequeath, leave
Translations

See also

  • bequeath
  • going to
  • modal verb
  • testament
  • volition
  • voluntary

Cahuilla

Etymology

From Proto-Uto-Aztecan *wip

Noun

wíll

  1. fat, grease

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /v?l/

Verb

will

  1. first/third-person singular present of wollen

will From the web:

  • what will the weather be like tomorrow
  • what will the weather be like today
  • what will happen to florida in 2025
  • what will dogecoin be worth in 2030
  • what will happen in 2021
  • what will the weather be tomorrow
  • what will happen in 2022
  • what will ethereum be worth in 2030

will in Examples From Wordnik

  • I think i have a book on birds that might interest you..will go check it out..if so will send it to you.
  • I make minus the peppercorns..will try with that next time...thanks for the almost single..when you write, I will want to be among the first ones to read it!
  • Guess I will love this egg curry..will have to try it soon Meera
  • Update: Ashley has more details, but doesn't answer my question, although to my eyes there's an implication that the new aggregator will be even less platform agnostic than iPlayer - which Ashley says *will* support GNU/Linux....
  • Update: Ashley has more details, but doesn't answer my question, although to my eyes there's an implication that the new aggregator will be even less platform agnostic than iPlayer - which Ashley says *will* support GNU/Linux....
  • Still debating as to whether or not wellies will be required I have a fetching pair of pink croc wellies so maybe I *will* need them...
  • Still debating as to whether or not wellies will be required I have a fetching pair of pink croc wellies so maybe I *will* need them...
  • Yes, a bunch of these will fail, but the ones that draw large audiences *will* be able to monetize down the line.
  • As a newbie to baking, this will be a challenge..will send the entry soon..
  • A Go to the press; tell them ‘It’s a mystery’ why you were fired; and tell them that no one will ever know, thereby challenging them to investigate why you were *really* fired and ensuring that all the embarrassing details *will* come out;

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