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different between each vs case

each

English

Etymology

From Middle English eche, from Old English ?l?, contraction of ??hwyl? (each, every, any, all), from Proto-Germanic *aiwô (ever, always) + *ga- + *hwil?kaz. Compare Scots ilk, elk (each, every), Saterland Frisian älk (each), West Frisian elk, elts (each), Dutch elk (each), Low German elk, ellik (each), German Low German elk, elke (each, every), German jeglich (any).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /i?t??/
  • (US) IPA(key): /it??/
  • Rhymes: -i?t?

Determiner

each

  1. All; every; qualifying a singular noun, indicating all examples of the thing so named seen as individual or separate items (compare every).

Usage notes

  • (all, every): The phrase beginning with each identifies a set of items wherein the words following each identify the individual elements by their shared characteristics. The phrase is grammatically singular in number, so if the phrase is the subject of a sentence, its verb is conjugated into a third-person singular form. Similarly, any pronouns that refer to the noun phrase are singular:
    Each candidate has 49 votes.
    Each voter must decide for herself.

Related terms

  • each and every
  • each other
  • to each his own

Translations

Adverb

each (not comparable)

  1. For one; apiece; per.

Translations

Pronoun

each

  1. Every one; every thing.

Noun

each (plural eaches)

  1. (operations, philosophy) An individual item: the least quantitative unit in a grouping.

Anagrams

  • Aceh, Ache, Chae, Chea, HACE, ache, hace

Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish ech, from Proto-Celtic *ek?os, from Proto-Indo-European *h?é?wos (horse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ax/

Noun

each m (genitive singular eich, nominative plural eacha)

  1. (archaic) horse

Declension

Synonyms

  • capall

Derived terms

  • eachmairt
  • eachra
  • giolla eich (horse-boy)

Mutation

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “ech”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • “ea?” in Foclóir Gae?ilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 1st ed., 1904, by Patrick S. Dinneen, page 272.
  • Finck, F. N. (1899), Die araner mundart, Marburg: Elwert’sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, vol. II, p. 22.
  • "each" in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish ech, from Proto-Celtic *ek?os, from Proto-Indo-European *h?é?wos (horse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?x/, /jax/

Noun

each m (genitive singular eich, plural eich)

  1. horse
  2. (dated) brute

Derived terms

  • each-mara
  • ruigidh each mall muileann

References

  • “each” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, ?ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “ech”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

West Frisian

Etymology

From Old Frisian ?ge, from Proto-Germanic *augô, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h?ek?- (eye; to see).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /???x/

Noun

each c (plural eagen, diminutive eachje)

  1. eye

Further reading

  • “each (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

each From the web:

  • what each emoji means
  • what each planet represents
  • what each color means
  • what each tarot card means
  • what each crystal means
  • what each state is known for
  • what each lightsaber color means
  • what each house means

each in Examples From Wordnik

  • The first seven structure to be placed around each for the wellness and betterment of everyone. ..each person, each community, each nation.
  • It appears to me that, given a differentiation of a species into two forms, each of which was adapted to a special sphere of existence, every slight degree of sterility would be a positive advantage, not to the _individuals_ who were sterile, but to _each form_.
  • "In whatever light we consider their invention, as parts of _one whole_, relative to each other, or independent _each of the rest_, and as single subjects, there can be scarcely named a beauty or a mystery, of which the Cartoons furnish not an instance or a clue; _they are poised between perspicuity and pregnancy of moment_."
  • On the first day he opened, he said to the assembled school that he wanted each scholar to consider him as _a friend_; that he desired nothing but their good; and that it was for the interest of _each one_ of them that _all_ should be careful to observe the few and simple rules which he should lay down for the government of the school.
  • I find ?I can tell each one what they make, ? ?each fellow put their foot on the line, ? ?nobody can do what they like? and ?she was one of these kind89 of people? in Charters, and ?I am not the kind of man that is always thinking about their record, ? ?if he was to hit a man in the head? they would think their nose tickled? in Lardner.
  • Where the valley is a flat one, with rising ground at each side, there should be a sub-main, to receive the laterals from _each_ hill side.
  • _Every_ denotes each without exception, and can now only be used with reference to more than two objects; _each_ may refer to two or more.
  • The difference between each? () and a manual JavaScript loop is that each () automatically maps the "this" object to the element in the collection being processed.
  • P £, D F I homologous to the fides B C» A B, A C9 each to each» becaufe the one & the other of thofe V are equal each to each to the V P* f.
  • But in my Method the aim is _to repeat as much of the sentence as is possible informing the question and the whole of it in each reply_; and in _question and reply_ the _word_ that _constitutes the point of both_ is to be especially _emphasized_, and in this way _the mind is exercised on each word of the sentence twice_ (once in question and once in answer), and _each word of the sentence is emphasized in reference to the whole of the sentence_.


case

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ke?s/
  • Rhymes: -e?s
  • Hyphenation: case

Etymology 1

Middle English cas, from Old French cas (an event), from Latin c?sus (a falling, a fall; accident, event, occurrence; occasion, opportunity; noun case), perfect passive participle of cad? (to fall, to drop).

Noun

case (plural cases)

  1. An actual event, situation, or fact.
  2. (now rare) A given condition or state.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.10:
      Ne wist he how to turne, nor to what place: / Was never wretched man in such a wofull cace.
    • 1726, Nathan Bailey, John Worlidge, Dictionarium Rusticum, Urbanicum & Botanicum
      Mares which are over-fat, hold with much difficulty; whereas those that are but in good case and plump, conceive with the greatest readiness and ease.
  3. A piece of work, specifically defined within a profession.
  4. (academia) An instance or event as a topic of study.
  5. (law) A legal proceeding, lawsuit.
  6. (grammar) A specific inflection of a word depending on its function in the sentence.
    • Now, the Subject of either an indicative or a subjunctive Clause is always assigned Nominative case, as we see from:
      (16) (a) ? I know [that they/*them/*their leave for Hawaii tomorrow]
      (16) (b) ? I demand [that they/*them/*their leave for Hawaii tomorrow]
      By contrast, the Subject of an infinitive Clause is assigned Objective case, as we see from:
      (17) ? I want [them/*they/*their to leave for Hawaii tomorrow]
      And the Subject of a gerund Clause is assigned either Objective or Genitive case: cf.
      (18) ? I don't like the idea of [them/their/*they leaving for Hawaii tomorrow]
  7. (grammar, uncountable) Grammatical cases and their meanings taken either as a topic in general or within a specific language.
  8. (medicine) An instance of a specific condition or set of symptoms.
  9. (programming) A section of code representing one of the actions of a conditional switch.
Synonyms
Hyponyms
  • court case
  • See also Thesaurus:grammatical case
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

case (third-person singular simple present cases, present participle casing, simple past and past participle cased)

  1. (obsolete) to propose hypothetical cases

See also

  • Appendix:Grammatical cases

References

  • case on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English cas, from Old Northern French casse, (compare Old French chasse (box, chest, case)), from Latin capsa (box, bookcase), from capi? (to take, seize, hold). Doublet of cash.

Noun

case (plural cases)

  1. A box that contains or can contain a number of identical items of manufacture.
  2. A box, sheath, or covering generally.
  3. A piece of luggage that can be used to transport an apparatus such as a sewing machine.
  4. An enclosing frame or casing.
  5. A suitcase.
  6. A piece of furniture, constructed partially of transparent glass or plastic, within which items can be displayed.
  7. The outer covering or framework of a piece of apparatus such as a computer.
  8. (printing, historical) A shallow tray divided into compartments or "boxes" for holding type, traditionally arranged in sets of two, the "upper case" (containing capitals, small capitals, accented) and "lower case" (small letters, figures, punctuation marks, quadrats, and spaces).
  9. (typography, by extension) The nature of a piece of alphabetic type, whether a “capital” (upper case) or “small” (lower case) letter.
  10. (poker slang) Four of a kind.
  11. (US) A unit of liquid measure used to measure sales in the beverage industry, equivalent to 192 fluid ounces.
  12. (mining) A small fissure which admits water into the workings.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  13. A thin layer of harder metal on the surface of an object whose deeper metal is allowed to remain soft.
  14. A cardboard box that holds (usually 24) beer bottles or cans.
    Synonym: carton
Hyponyms
Translations
References
  • Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. ?ISBN

Adjective

case (not comparable)

  1. (poker slang) The last remaining card of a particular rank.
    • 2006, David Apostolico, Lessons from the Professional Poker Tour (page 21)
      If he did have a bigger ace, I still had at least six outs — the case ace, two nines, and three tens. I could also have more outs if he held anything less than A-K.
References
  • Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. ?ISBN

Verb

case (third-person singular simple present cases, present participle casing, simple past and past participle cased)

  1. (transitive) To place (an item or items of manufacture) into a box, as in preparation for shipment.
  2. (transitive) To cover or protect with, or as if with, a case; to enclose.
    • 1856-1858, William H. Prescott, History of the Reign of Philip II
      The man who, cased in steel, had passed whole days and nights in the saddle.
  3. (transitive, informal) To survey (a building or other location) surreptitiously, as in preparation for a robbery.
    • 1977, Michael Innes, The Gay Phoenix, ?ISBN, page 116:
      You are in the grounds of Brockholes Abbey, a house into which a great deal of valuable property has just been moved. And your job is to case the joint for a break in.
    • 2014, Amy Goodman, From COINTELPRO to Snowden, the FBI Burglars Speak Out After 43 Years of Silence (Part 2), Democracy Now!, January 8, 2014, 0:49 to 0:57:
      Bonnie worked as a daycare director. She helped case the FBI office by posing as a college student interested in becoming an FBI agent.
Translations
Derived terms
  • case the deck

Anagrams

  • ACEs, ASCE, Aces, Ceas, ESCA, SCEA, aces, aesc, esca, æsc

Afar

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /???se/

Verb

casé

  1. (transitive) hit

Conjugation

References

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)?[2], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis), page 263

Asturian

Verb

case

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of casar

Chinese

Alternative forms

  • K?

Etymology

Borrowed from English case.

Pronunciation

Noun

case

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) case (clarification of this definition is needed)
    • 2015, ???, ????????? II??????????
      ????case???????????????case?? [Cantonese, trad.]
      ????case???????????????case?? [Cantonese, simp.]
      ni1 go3 hou2 do1 kei1 si2 gaa3. ni1 jat1 go3, zau6 hai6 zoeng1 gwok3 wing4, jau5 gam2 go3 kei1 si2 laa1. [Jyutping]
      That kind of case happens often. It happened with Leslie Cheung.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin casa, in the sense of "hut, cabin". The other senses are a semantic loan from Spanish casa. Doublet of chez, which was inherited.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /k?z/
  • Homophone: cases

Noun

case f (plural cases)

  1. (archaic, rare or regional) hut, cabin, shack
  2. box (on form)
  3. square (on board game)

Derived terms

  • case départ
  • case à cocher

Further reading

  • “case” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • à sec

Galician

Alternative forms

  • caixe

Etymology

Attested since the 15th century (quasy), from Latin quasi (as if).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [?k?s?]

Adverb

case

  1. almost

References

  • “quasy” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “case” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “case” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “case” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ca?se

Noun

case f

  1. plural of casa

Anagrams

  • asce, esca, seca

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?t?sas?/, [?t?sas?]

Noun

case

  1. nominative/accusative plural of cas

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *k?si, from late Proto-West Germanic *k?s?, borrowed from Latin c?seus.

Noun

câse m or n

  1. cheese

Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms

  • kese (eastern)

Descendants

  • Dutch: kaas
    • Afrikaans: kaas
      • ? Sotho: kase
      • ? Tswana: kase
    • ? Papiamentu: keshi (from the diminutive)
    • ? Sranan Tongo: kasi
  • Limburgish: kieës, kees

Further reading

  • “case”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929) , “case (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, ?ISBN, page I

Old French

Noun

case m (oblique plural cases, nominative singular cases, nominative plural case)

  1. (grammar) case

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ca?se
  • Rhymes: -azi

Verb

case

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of casar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of casar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of casar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of casar

Romanian

Noun

case

  1. plural of cas?

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?kase/, [?ka.se]

Verb

case

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of casar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of casar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of casar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of casar.

Venetian

Noun

case

  1. plural of casa

case From the web:

  • what case established judicial review
  • what cases fit iphone xr
  • what cases go to the supreme court
  • what cases fit iphone 11
  • what cases fit iphone 12
  • what cases fit iphone se 2020
  • what cases fit iphone x
  • what case is megan is missing based on

case in Examples From Wordnik

  • In either case, the blood will reflow upon the heart, and dilate the left ventricle, as in _case the first_, and others; and, if the mitral valves be thickened and rigid, the left auricle will be more dilated than in a case of simple aneurism of the left ventricle, as appeared also in the _first case_.
  • Evidence and economic theory suggests that control of the Internet by the phone and cable companies would lead to blocking of competing technologies (?as in theMadison River? case), blocking of innovative technologiesthat may not even compete with the phone/cable?cartel? (?according to Comcast itself, theComcast/BitTorrent case? would be an example), ?andincreased spying? on Internet users.
  • Evidence and economic theory suggests that control of the Internet by the phone and cable companies would lead to blocking of competing technologies (?as in theMadison River? case), blocking of innovative technologiesthat may not even compete with the phone/cable?cartel? (?according to Comcast itself, theComcast/BitTorrent case? would be an example), ?andincreased spying? on Internet users.
  • So, when we place a noun before a verb as actor or subject, we say it is in the _nominative case_; but when it follows a transitive verb or preposition, we say it has another _case_; that is, it assumes a new _position_ or _situation_ in the sentence: and this we call the _objective_ case.
  • +_Remember_+ that a noun or pronoun used as an _explanatory modifier_ is in the same case as the word which it explains, and that a noun or pronoun used _independently_ is in the _nominative case_.
  • +_Remember_+ that a noun or pronoun used as an _explanatory modifier_ is in the same case as the word which it explains, and that a noun or pronoun used _independently_ is in the _nominative case_.
  • +_Remember_+ that a noun or pronoun used as an _explanatory modifier_ is in the same case as the word which it explains, and that a noun or pronoun used _independently_ is in the _nominative case_.
  • If it be ?case? (I choose it as Jargon?s dearest child??in Heaven yclept Metonomy?) turn to the dictionary, if you will, and seek out what meaning can be derived from casus, its Latin ancestor: then try how, with a little trouble, you can extricate yourself from that case.
  • It says ?In the case of John Jenkins deceased, the coffin? when it means ?John Jenkins?s coffin?: and its yea is not yea, neither is its nay nay: but its answer is in the affirmative or in the negative, as the foolish and superfluous ?case? may be.
  • But here are a few specimens far, very far, worse: ?The special difficulty in Professor Minocelsi?s case [our old friend ?case? again] arose in connexion with the view he holds relative to the historical value of the opening pages of Genesis.

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