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different between depression vs apprehension

depression

English

Etymology

From Old French depression, from Latin depressio.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /d??p????n/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /d??p???(?)n/
  • Rhymes: -???n
  • Hyphenation: de?pres?sion

Noun

depression (countable and uncountable, plural depressions)

  1. (psychology) In psychotherapy and psychiatry, a state of mind producing serious, long-term lowering of enjoyment of life or inability to visualize a happy future.
  2. (geography) An area that is lower in topography than its surroundings.
  3. (psychology) In psychotherapy and psychiatry, a period of unhappiness or low morale which lasts longer than several weeks and may include ideation of self-inflicted injury or suicide.
  4. (meteorology) An area of lowered air pressure that generally brings moist weather, sometimes promoting hurricanes and tornadoes.
  5. (economics) A period of major economic contraction.
  6. (economics, US) Four consecutive quarters of negative, real GDP growth. See NBER.
  7. The act of lowering or pressing something down.
    Depression of the lever starts the machine.
  8. (biology, physiology) A lowering, in particular a reduction in a particular biological variable or the function of an organ, in contrast to elevation.

Related terms

  • depress
  • depressant
  • depressing
  • depressive

Translations

See also

  • downturn

Further reading

  • National Bureau of Economic Research on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

  • depression at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • depression in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • depression in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • opensiders, personised, sideperson

Danish

Noun

depression c (singular definite depressionen, plural indefinite depressioner)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Declension

Further reading

  • “depression” in Den Danske Ordbog

Finnish

Noun

depression

  1. Genitive singular form of depressio.

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

depression c

  1. depression (all meanings).

Declension

depression From the web:

  • what depression feels like
  • what depression looks like
  • what depression does to the brain
  • what depression do i have
  • what depression looks like meme
  • what depression medication is best for me
  • what depression do i have quiz
  • what depression feels like quotes

depression in Examples From Wordnik

  • In fact, the word depression has virtually replaced unhappiness in our internal vocabularies.
  • In fact, the word depression has virtually replaced unhappiness in our internal vocabularies.
  • If she took on too much, if she became overly excited, she could tumble into a state of despair for which the term "depression" seems rather mild.
  • If she took on too much, if she became overly excited, she could tumble into a state of despair for which the term "depression" seems rather mild.
  • In fact, the word depression has virtually replaced unhappiness in our internal vocabularies.
  • One cold shower and two cold beers later: stress, and its darker cousin depression, is a serious problem in Japan, I feel, but not one that is very well understood.
  • After World War II, the term depression lapsed into disuse, because economic downturns became milder and rarely involved general deflation (price declines).
  • I had never heard of the word depression when I was a child.
  • I had never heard of the word depression when I was a child.
  • "Just as the NBER does not define the term depression or identify depressions, there is no formal NBER definition or dating of the Great Depression," the bureau's website says.


apprehension

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin apprehensio, apprehensionis, compare with French appréhension. See apprehend.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /æp.???h?n.??n/
  • (US) IPA(key): /æp.?i?h?n.??n/

Noun

apprehension (countable and uncountable, plural apprehensions)

  1. (rare) The physical act of seizing or taking hold of (something); seizing.
    • 2006, Phil Senter, "Comparison of Forelimb Function between Deinonychus and Babiraptor (Theropoda: Dromaeosauridea)", Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 26, no. 4 (Dec.), p. 905:
      The wing would have been a severe obstruction to apprehension of an object on the ground.
  2. (law) The act of seizing or taking by legal process; arrest.
  3. perception; the act of understanding using one's intellect without affirming, denying, or passing any judgment
    • 1815, Percy Bysshe Shelley, "On Life," in A Defence of Poetry and Other Essays (1840 edition):
      We live on, and in living we lose the apprehension of life.
  4. Opinion; conception; sentiment; idea.
  5. The faculty by which ideas are conceived or by which perceptions are grasped; understanding.
  6. Anticipation, mostly of things unfavorable; dread or fear at the prospect of some future ill.

Usage notes

  • Apprehension springs from a sense of danger when somewhat remote, but approaching; alarm arises from danger when announced as near at hand. Apprehension is less agitated and more persistent; alarm is more agitated and transient.

Synonyms

  • (anticipation of unfavorable things): alarm
  • (act of grasping with the intellect): awareness, sense
  • See also Thesaurus:apprehension

Antonyms

  • inapprehension

Related terms

Translations

References

  • apprehension at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., 1989.

apprehension From the web:

  • what apprehension mean
  • what does apprehension mean

apprehension in Examples From Wordnik

  • The person in charge of dealing with such complaints called me back a few days later and said that that small plane was probably part of law enforcement monitoring an apprehension from the air in the event of a pursuit.
  • Vaccine apprehension is largely a luxury enjoyed by societies no longer ravaged by the dreadful diseases vaccines have helped prevent.
  • – If my apprehension is right and the bad effects of the law outweigh the good ...
  • Here in the Persian Gulf, apprehension is off the charts.
  • The rest of the monkey orchestra merely shivered in apprehension of what next atrocity should be perpetrated.
  • He lifted and dropped his feet with the lithe softness of a cat, and from time to time glanced to right and to left as if in apprehension of some flank attack.
  • Once, when the ketch, swerved by some vagrant current, came close to the break of the shore-surf, the blacks on board drew toward one another in apprehension akin to that of startled sheep in a fold when a wild woods marauder howls outside.
  • But it does fill me with a certain apprehension and worry to be competing against people whom I find more respectable, more deserving of being nominated.
  • Whitman's extravagant verse, unrestrained by rhyme and meter, subject to startling exclamations and even made-up words, was met with considerable apprehension from the literary community, Emerson and his fellows at The Atlantic included.
  • Whitman's extravagant verse, unrestrained by rhyme and meter, subject to startling exclamations and even made-up words, was met with considerable apprehension from the literary community, Emerson and his fellows at The Atlantic included.

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