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confusion

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Old French confusion, from Latin confusio, confusionem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /k?n?fju???n/
  • Rhymes: -u???n

Noun

confusion (usually uncountable, plural confusions)

  1. A lack of clarity or order.
  2. The state of being confused; misunderstanding.
  3. The act of mistaking one thing for another or conflating distinct things.
  4. Lack of understanding due to dementia.
  5. (archaic) A state of shame or embarrassment.

Synonyms

  • (lack of clarity or order): discombobulation
  • (state of being confused): bewilderment, disarray

Antonyms

  • (lack of clarity or order): clarity
  • (misunderstanding): distinction

Translations


French

Etymology

From Middle French confusion, from Old French confusion, borrowed from Latin confusio, confusionem, from verb confundo.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /k??.fy.zj??/

Noun

confusion f (plural confusions)

  1. confusion

Derived terms

  • prêter à confusion

Further reading

  • “confusion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French confusion.

Noun

confusion f (plural confusions)

  1. confusion

Descendants

  • French: confusion

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin confusio, confusionem.

Noun

confusion f (oblique plural confusions, nominative singular confusion, nominative plural confusions)

  1. spread (act or instance of spreading)

Descendants

  • English: confusion
  • Middle French: confusion
    • French: confusion

confusion From the web:

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confusion in Examples From Wordnik

  • Here, to simplify the discussion, we are using the term confusion in place of unawareness (ignorance), but without any connotation of disorganization, disorientation, or dementia.
  • Johnson's divisions, and one from Pickett's corps, flung itself upon it, and drove Crawford's and Ayre's division in confusion from the field for nearly two miles.
  • Lieutenant and boat's crew put off in confusion from the sinking vessel, and begged of Commodore Ingraham to cease firing, telling him that the water was already up to the berth-deck, and that they surrendered.
  • "I think the name confusion can only help us, right?"
  • Your confusion is a function of your reliance on simple-minded stereotypes.
  • This article demonstrates that a source of this confusion is a misunderstanding of the nature of a conviction and the difference between a fact necessarily decided to establish an element of the crime and an extraneous fact that appears in the record of conviction.
  • Anyway, she walks through this circle of standing stones and appears back in 1743 where the first person she sees when she emerges from her confusion is a gentlemen in 18th century army officers 'uniform, who looks just like her husband.
  • Your confusion is a function of your reliance on simple-minded stereotypes.
  • Adding to her confusion is the revelation that the current film is a remake of a doomed polish production that was never finished due to an unspeakable tragedy …
  • Adding to her confusion is the revelation that the current film is a remake of a doomed polish production that was never finished due to an unspeakable tragedy …


bustle

English

Etymology

From Middle English bustlen, bustelen, bostlen, perhaps an alteration of *busklen (> Modern English buskle), a frequentative of Middle English busken (to prepare; make ready), from Old Norse búask (to prepare oneself); or alternatively from a frequentative form of Middle English busten, bisten (to buffet; pummel; dash; beat) +? -le. Compare also Icelandic bustla (to splash; bustle).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?b?s?l/
  • Rhymes: -?s?l

Noun

bustle (countable and uncountable, plural bustles)

  1. (countable, uncountable) An excited activity; a stir.
    • 1748. David Hume. Enquiries concerning the human understanding and concerning the principles of moral. London: Oxford University Press, 1973. § 34.
      we are, perhaps, all the while flattering our natural indolence, which, hating the bustle of the world, and drudgery of business seeks a pretence of reason to give itself a full and uncontrolled indulgence
  2. (computing, countable) A cover to protect and hide the back panel of a computer or other office machine.
  3. (historical, countable) A frame worn underneath a woman's skirt, typically only protruding from the rear as opposed to the earlier more circular hoops.

Derived terms

  • hustle and bustle

Translations

Verb

bustle (third-person singular simple present bustles, present participle bustling, simple past and past participle bustled)

  1. To move busily and energetically with fussiness (often followed by about).
    The commuters bustled about inside the train station.
  2. To teem or abound (usually followed by with); to exhibit an energetic and active abundance (of a thing).
    The train station was bustling with commuters.
  3. (transitive) To push around, to importune.
    • 1981, A. D. Hope, "His Coy Mistress to Mr. Marvell," A Book of Answers:
      Don’t bustle her or fuss or snatch: / A suitor looking at his watch / Is not a posture that persuades / Willing, much less reluctant maids.

Synonyms

  • (to move busily): flit, hustle, scamper, scurry
  • (to exhibit an energetic abundance): abound, brim, bristle, burst, crawl, swell, teem

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • bluest, bluets, butles, sublet, subtle

bustle From the web:

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bustle in Examples From Wordnik

  • As the last melodies faded away, I heard a bustle from the doorway.
  • All hurry or bustle is peculiarly painful to the sick.
  • It is true, the populace retained themselves; but there arose a perpetual hum and bustle from the throng round the palace, which added to the noise of fireworks, the frequent explosion of arms, the tramp to and fro of horsemen and carriages, to which effervescence he was the focus, retarded his recovery.
  • There is an air of cold, solitary desolation about the noiseless streets which we are accustomed to see thronged at other times by a busy, eager crowd, and over the quiet, closely – shut buildings, which throughout the day are swarming with life and bustle, that is very impressive.
  • It was cut low over the bosom and the skirt was draped back over an enormous bustle and on the bustle was a huge bunch of pink velvet roses.
  • It was cut low over the bosom and the skirt was draped back over an enormous bustle and on the bustle was a huge bunch of pink velvet roses.
  • It was cut low over the bosom and the skirt was draped back over an enormous bustle and on the bustle was a huge bunch of pink velvet roses.
  • It was cut low over the bosom and the skirt was draped back over an enormous bustle and on the bustle was a huge bunch of pink velvet roses.
  • It was cut low over the bosom and the skirt was draped back over an enormous bustle and on the bustle was a huge bunch of pink velvet roses.
  • A later order was given to wear a camel-like "hump" at the base of the vertebral column, which was called the "bustle" -- a contrivance calculated to unnerve the wearer, not to speak of the looker-on; yet the American woman adopted it, distorted her body, and aped the gait of the kangaroo, the form being called the

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