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different between clangour vs commotion

clangour

English

Alternative forms

  • clangor (US, Canadian)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?klæ???/, /?klæ????/
  • Rhymes: -æ??(r), -æ???(r)

Noun

clangour (countable and uncountable, plural clangours)

  1. (Britain, Canada) A loud, repeating clanging sound; a loud racket; a din.
    • 1920, D. H. Lawrence, Women in Love, Chapter XXIV: Death and Love,
      And always, as the dark, inchoate eyes turned to him, there passed through Gerald's bowels a burning stroke of revolt, that seemed to resound through his whole being, threatening to break his mind with its clangour, and making him mad.

Derived terms

  • clangorous
  • clangorously

Translations

Verb

clangour (third-person singular simple present clangours, present participle clangouring, simple past and past participle clangoured)

  1. (Britain, Canada) To make a clanging sound.

Translations

clangour From the web:

  • what clangour mean
  • what does clamour mean
  • what does languor
  • what does languor mean
  • what does languor mean in english

clangour in Examples From Wordnik

  • And then, amid the clangour of the machinery, came a drifting suspicion of human voices, that I entertained at first only to dismiss.
  • They soon formed a deep and confused mass of dismounted cavalry in front of their encampment, when, at the signal of a shrill cry, which arose high over the clangour of the music, each cavalier sprung to his saddle.
  • A dirty orange glow escapes from half-open hatches, grilled vents, and small square windows of grimy glass, and the clangour of beaten metal can be heard far out into the endless snowstorm.
  • My own interest in Bethlem and madness came from a number of sources; the onomatopoeic clangour of the word Bedlam itself, suggesting an infernal din, like a bedstead falling downstairs, somehow echoed in the vast Victorian asylum near my childhood home, and its noisy but harmless residents, who occasionally spilled out into the streets, weeping and shouting.
  • 'There is the bell,' cried Sophie as a remote but insistent clangour reached them.
  • My own interest in Bethlem and madness came from a number of sources; the onomatopoeic clangour of the word Bedlam itself, suggesting an infernal din, like a bedstead falling downstairs, somehow echoed in the vast Victorian asylum near my childhood home, and its noisy but harmless residents, who occasionally spilled out into the streets, weeping and shouting.
  • Hereward passed on to the barracks, where the military music had seemed to halt; but on the Varangian crossing the threshold of the ample courtyard, it broke forth again with a tremendous burst, whose clangour almost stunned him, though well accustomed to the sounds.
  • My own interest in Bethlem and madness came from a number of sources; the onomatopoeic clangour of the word Bedlam itself, suggesting an infernal din, like a bedstead falling downstairs, somehow echoed in the vast Victorian asylum near my childhood home, and its noisy but harmless residents, who occasionally spilled out into the streets, weeping and shouting.
  • Also the winds brought rumbling earthquake and duststorm, thunder and lightning and the lurid thunderbolt, which are the shafts of great Zeus, and carried the clangour and the warcry into the midst of the two hosts.
  • An exchange of livings had been arranged with an acquaintance who was incumbent of a church in the south of London, and as soon as possible the couple removed thither, abandoning their pretty country home, with trees and shrubs and glebe, for a narrow, dusty house in a long, straight street, and their fine peal of bells for the wretchedest one-tongued clangour that ever tortured mortal ears.


commotion

English

Etymology

From Middle French commocion, from Latin comm?ti?nem, accusative singular of comm?ti?, from comm?tus, perfect passive participle of commove?.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /k??m??.??n/
  • (US) IPA(key): /k??mo?.??n/
  • Rhymes: -????n, -o???n

Noun

commotion (countable and uncountable, plural commotions)

  1. A state of turbulent motion.
  2. An agitated disturbance or a hubbub.
  3. (euphemistic) Sexual excitement.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:commotion

Derived terms

  • commotional

Related terms

Translations


French

Pronunciation

Noun

commotion f (plural commotions)

  1. A violent collision or shock; concussion
  2. shock, surprise

Further reading

  • “commotion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

commotion From the web:

  • what commotion means
  • what commotion does the bird create
  • what commotion is being referred to

commotion in Examples From Wordnik

  • In this installment we get to see all the players converge on a yacht owned by one of the richest men in New York, and discover what all the commotion is about.
  • I really don't see what all the commotion is about.
  • The minute you step into his bedroom, loud alarms sound and Disney cast members come running to see what all the commotion is about.
  • You should reconsider how you look at the world - the most obvious reason for all of this commotion is "A Mistake".
  • Some of the commotion is unsettling if you are tyring to have a normal home life.
  • All this commotion is caused by the fact that she INSISTS on making this trip NOW.
  • Some of the commotion is unsettling if you are tyring to have a normal home life.
  • You should reconsider how you look at the world - the most obvious reason for all of this commotion is "A Mistake".
  • Wednesday's commotion is likely to give both candidates a financial boost.
  • One morning, several days later, the arena was vexed by uproar and commotion from the animal cages.

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