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cappuccino

English

Etymology

1904, borrowed from Italian cappuccino, from Viennese German Kapuziner (Capuchin), due to the similarity of the color of the beverage to the monastic habit of dark brown; compare Franziskaner (Franciscan), a contemporary coffee drink with more milk and hence a lighter color, more similar to the latter monks’ habits of light brown. The German term Kapuziner is in turn a loan translation from Italian cappuccino (Capuchin) (thus the Italian word for the coffee beverage is a reborrowing), from Italian cappuccio (hood, cowl) + -ino ((diminutive)), due to the hood of the Capuchin monks’ habits, from Italian cappa (hood, cowl) + -uccio ((diminutive)) (note two diminutive suffixes), in turn from Late Latin cappa (English cape).

Doublet of Capuchin, also from Italian cappuccino (via Middle French capuchin).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /?kæp??t?ino?/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /?kæp??t?i?n??/
  • Rhymes: -i?n??
  • Hyphenation: cap?puc?ci?no

Noun

cappuccino (countable and uncountable, plural cappuccinos or cappuccini)

  1. (uncountable) An Italian coffee-based beverage made from espresso and milk that has been steamed and/or frothed.
  2. (countable) A cup of this beverage.
  3. (countable, uncountable, proscribed) Any of various similar drinks.
  4. (uncountable) Capuchin or the color, especially cappuccino brown.
    • 1928, The Detroit Free Press (Detroit, Michigan), 1928-09-29:
      English Grey or Cappuccino Brown

See also

  • latte

Translations

References


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian cappuccino.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?k?.pu?t?i.no?/, (less common) /?k?.py?t?i.no?/
  • Hyphenation: cap?puc?ci?no

Noun

cappuccino m (plural cappuccino's, diminutive cappuccinootje n)

  1. cappuccino

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian cappuccino.

Noun

cappuccino

  1. cappuccino (beverage and serving)

Declension


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian cappuccino.

Pronunciation

Noun

cappuccino m (plural cappuccinos)

  1. cappuccino

Italian

Etymology

From cappuccio (hood, cowl) +? -ino. The coffee name gets its name from the colour of the beverage, which is reminiscent of the colour of monks' habits.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kap.put?t??i.no/

Noun

cappuccino m (plural cappuccini)

  1. Capuchin (member of an order of Roman Catholic friars)
  2. cappuccino
    Synonym: (informal) cappuccio
  3. (slang) French letter, rubber johnny (condom)

Descendants

Adjective

cappuccino (feminine cappuccina, masculine plural cappuccini, feminine plural cappuccine)

  1. Capuchin

Further reading

  • cappuccino1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • cappuccino2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • cappuccino (bevanda) on the Italian Wikipedia.Wikipedia it

References


Polish

Etymology

From Italian cappuccino.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ka.pu?t??i.n?/

Noun

cappuccino n (indeclinable)

  1. cappuccino

Adjective

cappuccino (not comparable)

  1. Having the taste or color of cappuccino.

Declension

Indeclinable.

Further reading

  • cappuccino in Wielki s?ownik j?zyka polskiego, Instytut J?zyka Polskiego PAN
  • cappuccino in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian cappuccino.

Noun

cappuccino m (plural cappuccinos or cappuccini (rare))

  1. cappuccino (type of coffee)

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian cappuccino.

Noun

cappuccino m (plural cappuccinos)

  1. cappuccino

Swedish

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian cappuccino.

Noun

cappuccino c

  1. cappuccino

Declension

cappuccino From the web:

  • what cappuccino
  • what cappuccino vs latte
  • what cappuccino does starbucks have
  • what cappuccinos are at starbucks
  • what's cappuccino made of
  • what's cappuccino means
  • what cappuccino does mcdonald's use

cappuccino in Examples From Wordnik

  • So Take care with our cappuccino is not a proper translation of the original.
  • So Take care with our cappuccino is not a proper translation of the original.
  • So Take care with our cappuccino is not a proper translation of the original.
  • Imagine we were to find out one day that Starbucks had been recording everyone's conversations for the purpose of figuring out whether cappuccino is more popular than macchiato.
  • The Viennese soon added milk to their coffee beans and the name cappuccino was born.
  • I personally try and keep it simple with a Grande, skim, triple, bone-dry cappuccino, which is Starbuck's English for the kind of cappuccino you'd get at the Rome airport.
  • They don’t want to know whether there’s a difference between the Starbucks version and the real thing, they don’t actually care whether a cappuccino is half foam and a latte is only topped with foam.
  • Your cappuccino will be there for you, as reliably as the way an out-sourced defense contractor in Kandahar Province uses his copy of the Army's Rules of Engagement to paper train the dog he's stolen from the son of tribal elder.
  • On the other hand, it wouldn't hurt to butter him up a bit, and in cases like this a small gift like a piece of candy or a cappuccino is a nice way to say you're sorry, and that you care.
  • As it turned out, I understood nearly everything and had a great time, and since I had a cappuccino while I was there I'm WIDE awake (I don't normally drink coffee at all -- never, in fact -- but I thought ordering a cappuccino was a bit more appropriate than ordering a hot chocolate [my hot beverage of choice] and I wasn't in the mood for something alcoholic).


latter

English

Etymology

From Old English lætra, comparative form of læt (late).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: l?t'?(r), IPA(key): /?læt.?(?)/
    • (US) IPA(key): /?læt?.??/, [?læ?.?]
  • Homophone: ladder (in accents with flapping)
  • Rhymes: -æt?(r)

Adjective

latter (not comparable)

  1. Relating to or being the second of two items.
    • 2017, Jennifer S. Holland, "For These Monkeys, It’s a Fight for Survival.", National Geographic (March 2017)[1]
      On sale next to dried fish and chicken feet were rats and bats (the latter's wings in a pile like leather scraps, also for sale), plus cut-up pigs and monkeys, their faces intact.
    • 1725, Isaac Watts, Logick, or The Right Use of Reason in the Enquiry After Truth With a Variety of Rules to Guard
      the difference between reason and revelation, and in what sense the latter is superior
  2. Near (or nearer) to the end.
  3. In the past, but close (or closer) to the present time.
    • 1690, John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding
      Hath not navigation discovered in these latter ages, whole nations at the bay of Soldania [...]?

Antonyms

  • aforesaid
  • aforementioned
  • former

Derived terms

  • lattermost

Related terms

  • latter-day
  • latterly
  • lattermath
  • last, the superlative form of "latter"

Translations

Anagrams

  • Tatler, rattle

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse hlátr, from Proto-Germanic *hlahtraz (laughter), cognate with Norwegian lått, English laughter and German Gelächter. Derived from the verb *hlahjan? (to laugh), cf. Danish le, English laugh, German lachen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [?lad??]

Noun

latter c (singular definite latteren, not used in plural form)

  1. laughter

Inflection


Norman

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

latter

  1. (Jersey) to beat, spank, cane

Synonyms

  • (to cane): codrer, donner la tchêne, vrédîndgi, vrier

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse hlátr

Noun

latter m (definite singular latteren) (uncountable)

  1. laughter
  2. laugh

Synonyms

  • lått (Nynorsk also)

Derived terms

References

  • “latter” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

latter From the web:

latter in Examples From Wordnik

  • The latter regarded the former as inftru - ments of power* wifliing ro pay their court to the Mother Countiyf by curbing the fpirit of American freedom* and the fornex kept a flridl eye on the latter* left they might fmooth the way to independency* at which they were charged, with aiming.
  • If my read of my neighbors plate is accurate, the latter translates as cold hash browns.
  • Luckily for us lazy Linux geeks the latter is automagically put in if you use tab auto-completion.
  • But the faculty of judgment normally prevents us from falling into mere free - association mode: the latter is the stuff of paranoia and conspiracy theories.
  • Henrik Pontén (Swedish Anti-Piracy Bureau), Monique Wadsted (movie industry lawyer) and Peter Danowsky (IFPI) – the latter is also a member of the board of the association.
  • With (500) Days, Sin Nombre and A Serious Man in competition, Precious really didn't deserve to win either best film or best director (the latter is a total joke, the directing was by far the weakest part of the movie, I mean, compare that to the job that the Coens did)
  • You seem to be confusing Congress exercising direct willpower over the world versus merely exercising direct willpower over itself, and the latter is actually something it can straightforwardly do.
  • Furthermore, if the latter is the case then other retailers are benefitting from Wal Mart's higher tax payments.
  • * It's easier to prove a global warming trend than "changing the climate" since the latter is a convoluted concept.
  • Furthermore, if the latter is the case then other retailers are benefitting from Wal Mart's higher tax payments.

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