free hit counter

different between blockade vs interference

blockade

English

Etymology

From block +? -ade.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bl??ke?d/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bl??ke?d/
  • Rhymes: -e?d

Noun

blockade (plural blockades)

  1. The physical blocking or surrounding of a place, especially a port, in order to prevent commerce and traffic in or out.
  2. (by extension) Any form of formal isolation of something, especially with the force of law or arms.
  3. (nautical) The ships or other forces used to effect a naval blockade.
  4. (chess) Preventing an opponent's pawn moving by placing a piece in front of it

Translations

Verb

blockade (third-person singular simple present blockades, present participle blockading, simple past and past participle blockaded)

  1. (transitive) To create a blockade against.

Translations

Anagrams

  • dockable

blockade From the web:

  • blockade meaning
  • what's blockade in french
  • blockade what happened
  • what does blockade mean
  • what is blockade running
  • what is blockade in international law
  • what are blockade runners
  • what does blockade mean in social studies

blockade in Examples From Wordnik

  • A minor point but funnily enough while most international lawyers agree that Israel retains some responsibilities as an occupying power in Gaza, they are much more wary about using the term blockade which has a very specific meaning within the laws of war (though ironically the IDF uses the term somewhat loosely itself in relation to Gaza).
  • Cuban officials use the term "blockade" to refer to the nearly 50-year-old U.S. economic embargo.
  • But they do let them dock after a search ahem. have you seen the list of blockaded items? the blockade is about collective punishment and to reduce the civilian population of gaza to a state of breaking point.
  • Generally a blockade is an Act of War, meaning that most aspects of it are dealt with under that category, rather than maritime law.
  • Given that they already exist, the blockade is a longstanding legal means of prosecuting those hostilities.
  • Do you seriously think that heading for a war zone to run a blockade is the equivalent of riding your car down I-95 with a cooler and a picnic lunch?
  • Generally a blockade is an Act of War, meaning that most aspects of it are dealt with under that category, rather than maritime law.
  • It takes some effort not to notice, for example, that just yesterday I wrote “The whole Gaza blockade is an example of this stupidity.”
  • Martinned: Generally a blockade is an Act of War, meaning that most aspects of it are dealt with under that category, rather than maritime law.
  • It takes some effort not to notice, for example, that just yesterday I wrote “The whole Gaza blockade is an example of this stupidity.”


interference

English

Etymology

From interfere +? -ence. The sense in physics was likely introduced by Thomas Young, which he used as early as 1802 in a paper in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /??nt???fi??ns/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /??nt??fi??ns/

Noun

interference (countable and uncountable, plural interferences)

  1. The act of interfering with something, or something that interferes.
  2. (sports) The illegal obstruction of an opponent in some ball games.
    They were glued to the TV, as the referee called out a fifteen yard penalty for interference.
  3. (physics) An effect caused by the superposition of two systems of waves.
  4. A distortion on a broadcast signal due to atmospheric or other effects.
    They wanted to watch the game on TV, but there was too much interference to even make out the score on the tiny screen.
  5. (US, law) In United States patent law, an inter partes proceeding to determine the priority issues of multiple patent applications; a priority contest.
  6. (chess) The interruption of the line between an attacked piece and its defender by sacrificially interposing a piece.
  7. (linguistics) The situation where a person who knows two languages inappropriately transfers lexical items or structures from one to the other.

Antonyms

  • noninterference

Derived terms

Translations

interference From the web:

  • what interference means
  • what inference can be made about the cyclops
  • what inference can be drawn from the graph
  • what inference can be made about romeo from this dialogue
  • what interference of light
  • what interference of light takes place
  • what inference you get when qc=kc
  • what is an example of interference

interference in Examples From Wordnik

  • Poirot himself remains unchanged, although his interference is a catalyst for the woman's change.
  • Poirot himself remains unchanged, although his interference is a catalyst for the woman's change.
  • The official who resigned said he walked off because of what he calls interference of foreigners.
  • A spokesman for President Robert Mugabe lashed out at foreign countries at what he calls their interference with the country's election process.
  • Well, the militant group Hamas is protesting what it calls interference by the U.S. and Israel.
  • Scott McClellan telling reporters that the Bush administration is deeply concerned about what he called interference and intimidation by Syrian operatives in Lebanon.
  • He was somebody who even while the Syrians were here, was unsparing in his criticism about Syrian involvement and what he called interference in Lebanon.
  • Mugabe, in return, lambasted Britain for what he called interference in his country's internal affairs.
  • Thirty six members of Jordan's major tribes have attacked what they called the interference of Queen Rania.
  • The delegations of Russia, China and Cuba all took the floor to denounce what they called interference in Syria's internal affairs and said that they would vote against the text.

you may also like

+1
Share
Pin
Like
Send
Share