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different between amatory vs benevolent

amatory

English

Etymology

From Latin am?t?rius (pertaining to love or a lover, adjective), from am?tor (a lover), from am? (I love).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /?a.m?.t?.?i/

Adjective

amatory (comparative more amatory, superlative most amatory)

  1. Of or relating to love, especially sexual love.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, II.170:
      Eggs, oysters, too, are amatory food; / But who is their purveyor from above / Heaven knows []

Related terms

Translations

References

  • amatory in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • amatory in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • amatory at OneLook Dictionary Search

amatory From the web:

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amatory in Examples From Wordnik

  • Her subject was usually 'amatory' fiction, narratives of desire focussing on highly charged sexual episodes, concerned with love and seduction in all their guises.
  • He is much more in his element when he proves that a lover is to his mistress, when she is about to go to a ball, only a "decimal of a lover," a kind of amatory tailor or ninth part of man; or when, in the
  • Google Translate comes up with this version of a Spanish-language article in Petroleum World: “After his second divorce, amatory life of Hugo Chávez has shielded beneath the mysterious mantle of power.”
  • Google Translate comes up with this version of a Spanish-language article in Petroleum World: “After his second divorce, amatory life of Hugo Chávez has shielded beneath the mysterious mantle of power.”
  • How amatory God contingency be to have bestowed this ray of light in to his miserable life.
  • Google Translate comes up with this version of a Spanish-language article in Petroleum World: “After his second divorce, amatory life of Hugo Chávez has shielded beneath the mysterious mantle of power.”
  • How amatory God contingency be to have bestowed this ray of light in to his miserable life.
  • Almonds in particular have been touted for their amatory properties, being, as they are, fragrant and shaped like a woman's hips.
  • One might see this as someprofound metaphor for the human condition, or at least its amatory component.
  •            Fifi returns with Fritz's snack, allowing him to camouflage his excitement as amatory.


benevolent

English

Etymology

From Old French benevolent, borrowed from Latin benevol?ns ("well wishing"). Displaced native Old English welwillende.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /b??n?v?l?nt/

Adjective

benevolent (comparative more benevolent, superlative most benevolent)

  1. Having a disposition to do good.
    Chinese and Eastern mythologies describe dragons as benevolent.
  2. Possessing or manifesting love for mankind.
  3. Altruistic, charitable, good, just and fair.

Antonyms

  • malevolent

Derived terms

  • benevolently
  • benevolentness

Related terms

Translations

benevolent From the web:

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benevolent in Examples From Wordnik

  • It was only the other day I read in the report of the Consumers? League in my own city that ?a benevolent institution, ? when found giving out clothing to be made in tenement houses that were not licensed, and taken to task for it, asked the agents of the League to ?show some way in which the law could be evaded?; but it is just as well for that ?benevolent institution? that name and address were wanting, or it might find its funds running short unaccountably.
  • The term benevolent compassion puzzled Noam Cohen, executive editor of Inside.com and a former copy editor at the New York Times.
  • The term benevolent compassion puzzled Noam Cohen, executive editor of Inside.com and a former copy editor at the New York Times.
  • Well, I don't like the term benevolent dictator, and I don't think that it's my job or my role in the world of ideas to be the dictator of the future of all human knowledge compiled by the world.
  • Well, I don't like the term benevolent dictator, and I don't think that it's my job or my role in the world of ideas to be the dictator of the future of all human knowledge compiled by the world.
  • Well, I don't like the term benevolent dictator, and I don't think that it's my job or my role in the world of ideas to be the dictator of the future of all human knowledge compiled by the world.
  • "Well, I am what I call a benevolent thief," replied Shih-Kung.
  • "This person did not have access to what we call our benevolent fund," he said Thursday.
  • Like many who assume that I am one to whom the high court’s decisions about language can be appealed, he wrote to me: I was wondering what you made of Justice Scalia’s use of the term benevolent compassion.
  • Like many who assume that I am one to whom the high court’s decisions about language can be appealed, he wrote to me: I was wondering what you made of Justice Scalia’s use of the term benevolent compassion.

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