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different between adjust vs place

adjust

English

Etymology

From Middle English ajusten, borrowed from Middle French adjuster, or Old French, from Latin ad (to, up to, towards) + iustus (correct, proper, exact). Probably influenced in sense by Old French ajouster (cf. modern ajouter), from Vulgar Latin *adiuxt?re, from Latin iuxta. The Middle English originally meant "to correct, remedy" in the late 14th century, and was reborrowed from Middle French in the early 17th century. According to another view on the etymology, the word was actually derived from Old French ajouster and then supposedly later influenced by folk etymology from Latin iustus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /??d??st/
  • Rhymes: -?st

Verb

adjust (third-person singular simple present adjusts, present participle adjusting, simple past and past participle adjusted)

  1. (transitive) To modify.
  2. (transitive) To improve or rectify.
  3. (transitive) To settle an insurance claim.
  4. (intransitive) To change to fit circumstances.

Synonyms

  • (to modify something): change, edit, modify, set

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • Adjustment on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

References

Anagrams

  • udjats

adjust From the web:

  • what adjusted gross income
  • what adjustable beds are covered by medicare
  • what adjusts the viscosity of the paint
  • what adjusts the level of light
  • what adjusts the amount of light on a microscope
  • what adjusts the light on a microscope
  • what adjustments are allowed by the irs
  • what adjusting entry is unique to a corporation

adjust in Examples From Wordnik

  • Could Pittman adjust from a 4-3 defense to fit seamlessly into Crennel's 3-4 scheme?
  • Can a defensive lineman adjust from a 4-3 defense to fit seamlessly into the Browns '3-4 scheme?
  • Some people just have to adjust from the type "A" self defense type of lifestyle.
  • Now, most designer labels adjust only sizing, colors and fit to suit different markets.
  • Banks will be subject to new restraints on lending but will have more than eight years to adjust, which is longer than anticipated.
  • (So the labels adjust automatically as you reorder pages and / or add / remove pages, or alter some document attributes.
  • With cheaper-specced trailers, the adjuster extending from the ram to the brake drums is on a splined shaft and the only way to adjust is to remove the circlip (which often involves getting the gas torch out).
  • With cheaper-specced trailers, the adjuster extending from the ram to the brake drums is on a splined shaft and the only way to adjust is to remove the circlip (which often involves getting the gas torch out).
  • Rather than helping major record labels adjust to the changing market, it continually, repeatedly and publicly destroyed its own reputation and the reputation of the labels -- each time shrinking their potential market by blaming the very people they should have been working to turn into customers.
  • Rather than helping major record labels adjust to the changing market, it continually, repeatedly and publicly destroyed its own reputation and the reputation of the labels -- each time shrinking their potential market by blaming the very people they should have been working to turn into customers.


place

English

Alternative forms

  • pleace (some English dialects: 18th–19th centuries; Scots: until the 17th century)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pl?s, IPA(key): /ple?s/, [p?l?e?s]
  • Rhymes: -e?s
  • Homophone: plaice

Etymology 1

From Middle English place, conflation of Old English plæse, plætse, plæ?e (place, an open space, street) and Old French place (place, an open space), both from Latin platea (plaza, wide street), from Ancient Greek ??????? (plateîa), shortening of ??????? ???? (plateîa hodós, broad way), from Proto-Indo-European *plat- (to spread), extended form of *pleh?- (flat). Displaced native Old English st?w. Compare also English pleck (plot of ground), West Frisian plak (place, spot, location), Dutch plek (place, spot, patch). Doublet of piatza, piazza, and plaza.

Noun

place (plural places)

  1. (physical) An area; somewhere within an area.
    1. An open space, particularly a city square, market square, or courtyard.
      • c. 1590, William Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Act IV, scene iv
        Ay, sir, the other squirrel was stolen from me by the hangman's boys in the market-place
    2. (often in street names or addresses) A street, sometimes but not always surrounding a public place, square, or plaza of the same name.
    3. An inhabited area: a village, town, or city.
    4. Any area of the earth: a region.
    5. The area one occupies, particularly somewhere to sit.
    6. The area where one lives: one's home, formerly (chiefly) country estates and farms.
      • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, ch 2:
        My Lady Dedlock has been down at what she calls, in familiar conversation, her "place" in Lincolnshire.
    7. An area of the skin.
    8. (euphemistic slang) An area to urinate and defecate: an outhouse or lavatory.
      • 1901, John Stephen Farmer & al., Slang and Its Analogues Past and Present, Vol. V, page 220:
        Place,... (2) a jakes, or house of ease.
      • 1951, William Styron, Lie Down in Darkness, Ch. ii, page 59:
        ‘I guess I'll take this opportunity to go to the place’...
        ‘She means the little girls room.’
    9. (obsolete) An area to fight: a battlefield or the contested ground in a battle.
  2. A location or position in space.
  3. A particular location in a book or document, particularly the current location of a reader.
  4. (obsolete) A passage or extract from a book or document.
  5. (obsolete, rhetoric) A topic.
  6. A frame of mind.
  7. (chess, obsolete) A chess position; a square of the chessboard.
  8. (social) A responsibility or position in an organization.
    1. A role or purpose; a station.
      • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Great Place
        Men in great place are thrice servants.
    2. The position of a contestant in a competition.
    3. (horse-racing) The position of first, second, or third at the finish, especially the second position.
    4. The position as a member of a sports team.
  9. (obsolete) A fortified position: a fortress, citadel, or walled town.
  10. Numerically, the column counting a certain quantity.
  11. Ordinal relation; position in the order of proceeding.
    • a. 1788, Mather Byles, quoted in The Life of James Otis by William Tudor
      In the first place, I do not understand politics; in the second place, you all do, every man and mother's son of you; in the third place, you have politics all the week, pray let one day in the seven be devoted to religion []
  12. Reception; effect; implying the making room for.
    • My word hath no place in you.
Synonyms
  • (market square): courtyard, piazza, plaza, square
  • (somewhere to sit): seat
  • (outhouse or lavatory): See Thesaurus:bathroom
  • (location): location, position, situation, stead, stell, spot
  • (frame of mind): frame of mind, mindset, mood
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Pijin: ples
  • Tok Pisin: ples
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English placen, from the noun (see above).

Verb

place (third-person singular simple present places, present participle placing, simple past and past participle placed)

  1. (transitive) To put (an object or person) in a specific location.
  2. (intransitive) To earn a given spot in a competition.
    1. (intransitive, racing) To finish second, especially of horses or dogs.
  3. (transitive) To remember where and when (an object or person) has been previously encountered.
  4. (transitive, passive) To achieve (a certain position, often followed by an ordinal) as in a horse race.
  5. (transitive) To sing (a note) with the correct pitch.
  6. (transitive) To arrange for or to make (a bet).
  7. (transitive) To recruit or match an appropriate person for a job.
  8. (sports, transitive) To place-kick (a goal).
Conjugation

Additional archaic forms include the second-person singular past tense placedst.

Synonyms
  • (to earn a given spot):
  • (to put in a specific location): deposit, lay, lay down, put down
  • (to remember where and when something or someone was previously encountered):
  • (passive, to achieve a certain position): achieve, make
  • (to sing (a note) with the correct pitch): reach
  • (to arrange for, make (a bet)):
  • (to recruit or match an appropriate person):
Derived terms
Translations

Anagrams

  • Capel, Caple, capel, caple, clape

Czech

Alternative forms

  • placu (locative singular)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [?plat?s?]
  • Rhymes: -ats?
  • Hyphenation: pla?ce

Noun

place

  1. vocative/locative singular of plac

Anagrams

  • palce, palec

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plas/
  • Homophones: placent, places

Etymology 1

From Old French place, from Latin platea, from Ancient Greek ??????? (plateîa).

Noun

place f (plural places)

  1. place, square, plaza, piazza
  2. place, space, room
  3. place, seat

Derived terms

Descendants
  • Haitian Creole: laplas (with definite article la)
    • ? English: laplas
  • ? Moroccan Arabic: ?????? (bla?a)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the main entry.

Verb

place

  1. first/third-person singular present indicative of placer
  2. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of placer
  3. second-person singular imperative of placer

Further reading

  • “place” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • clape, Le Cap

Interlingua

Verb

place

  1. present of placer
  2. imperative of placer

Latin

Verb

plac?

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of place?

Old French

Alternative forms

  • plache, plaise, plas

Etymology

From Latin platea.

Noun

place f (oblique plural places, nominative singular place, nominative plural places)

  1. place; location

Descendants

  • French: place
    • Haitian Creole: laplas (with definite article la)
      • ? English: laplas
  • ? Irish: plás (through Anglo-Norman)
  • ? Middle Dutch: plaetse
    • Dutch: plaats
    • Limburgish: plaotsj, plaatsj
  • ? Middle High German: blaz, plaz
    • German: Platz
      • ? Czech: plac
      • ? Estonian: plats
      • ? Macedonian: ???? (plac)
      • ? Polish: plac
        • ? Russian: ???? (plac)
      • ? Serbo-Croatian:
        • Cyrillic: ????
        • Latin: plac
    • Luxembourgish: Plaz
  • ? Middle Low German: platse, platze
    • ? Old Norse: plaz
      • Danish: plads
      • Faroese: pláss
      • Norwegian: plass
      • Old Swedish: platz
        • Swedish: plats
      • Westrobothnian: plass
  • ? Middle English: place (conflated with Old English plæse, plætse, plæ?e)
    • English: place
      • Pijin: ples
      • Tok Pisin: ples
  • ? Moroccan Arabic: ?????? (bla?a)
  • Norman: plache (through Old Northern French plache)
  • Walloon: plaece
  • ? Welsh: plas

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (place, supplement)
  • place on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /?pla.t?s?/

Noun

place m inan

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative plural of plac

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [?plat??e]

Verb

place

  1. second-person singular imperative of pl?cea
  2. third-person singular present indicative of pl?cea

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /?pla?e/, [?pla.?e]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /?plase/, [?pla.se]

Verb

place

  1. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of placer.
  2. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of placer.

place From the web:

  • what places hire at 14
  • what places are open right now
  • what places deliver near me
  • what place are the cubs in
  • what place are the dodgers in
  • what places hire at 15
  • what place are the yankees in
  • what places hire at 16

place in Examples From Wordnik

  • Moving on? happy place, happy place? sittin here eating frozen snickers bars and drinking mountain dew and talking on the phone to my friend Anthony.
  • But Barzillai felt, and felt rightly, that in his circumstances, the place in which he had been brought up -- "_his own place_" -- was the best place for him.
  • From time to time even now readjustments are made in the details of all three indexes, the fossil, the modern, and the embryonic, the method of rearrangement being charmingly simple: _just taking a card out of one place and putting it into another place_ where we may think it more properly belongs.
  • "The lowest place, _the lowest place_, I can abide no other."
  • "The lowest place, _the lowest place_, I can abide no other."
  • And as it gets hold of you it crowds your mind and heart and life till every other is either crowded out, or crowded to a lower place; _out_, if it jars; _lower place_, if it agrees, for every agreeing bit yields to the lead of this tremendous message.
  • The principal place of resort of this class is Marina Rotche, lying about two versts from Moscow, and thither I drove, attended by a _valet de place_.
  • Arras was a famous Jacobin centre, and from the balcony of this theatre, Lebon, one of the Jacobins, directed the executions, which took place abundantly on the pretty _place_.
  • The name of the place, -- or rather neighborhood, for I don't know where the _place_ actually is -- there are three places, and they are all four or five miles off -- Mill Village, and Pemunk, and Sandon; the name of the neighborhood, -- Brickfield Farms, comes from there having been brickmaking done here at one time; but it was given up.
  • The trite maxim, * A place for everything, and everything in its place*, so commends itself to the sense of fitness, as hardly to need exposition or enforcement; yet while no maxim is more generally admitted, scarce any is so frequently violated in practice.

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