free hit counter

different between abominable vs disquieting

abominable

English

Etymology

From Middle English abhomynable, from Old French abominable, from Late Latin ab?min?bilis (deserving abhorrence), from ab?minor (abhor, deprecate as an ill omen), from ab (from, away from) + ?minor (forebode, predict, presage), from ?men (sign, token, omen). Formerly erroneously folk-etymologized as deriving from Latin ab- + homo and therefore spelled abhominable, abhominal; see those entries for more.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /??b?m.?.n?.bl?/, /??b?m.n?.bl?/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /??b?m.?.n?.b?/

Adjective

abominable (comparative more abominable, superlative most abominable)

  1. Worthy of, or causing, abhorrence, as a thing of evil omen; odious in the utmost degree; very hateful; detestable; loathsome; execrable. [first attested around 1150 to 1350]
  2. (obsolete) Excessive, large (used as an intensifier).
  3. Very bad or inferior.
  4. Disagreeable or unpleasant. [First attested in the late 19th century.]

Usage notes

  • Nouns to which "abominable" is often applied: man, woman, crime, act, deed, sin, vice, character, place, mystery, treatment, church, bride, snowman.

Alternative forms

  • abhominable (obsolete, based on folk etymology), abhominal (obsolete, based on folk etymology)

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • ? Norwegian Bokmål: abominabel

Translations

References

  • abominable in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • abominable in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • abominable at OneLook Dictionary Search

Catalan

Etymology

From Late Latin ab?min?bilis.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /?.bo.mi?na.bl?/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /?.bu.mi?na.bl?/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /a.bo.mi?na.ble/
  • Rhymes: -a?le

Adjective

abominable (masculine and feminine plural abominables)

  1. abominable

Derived terms

  • abominablement

Related terms

  • abominar
  • abominació

French

Etymology

From Late Latin ab?min?bilis (abominable, detestable).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /a.b?.mi.nabl/
  • Homophone: abominables

Adjective

abominable (plural abominables)

  1. Absolutely loathsome; abominable.
  2. Exceedingly bad or ugly; abominable.

Synonyms

  • Most terms of the second category also have literal meanings closer to that of the first, but are now less common in these uses, as well as marking actions that are not as markedly odious.
  • (loathsome): odieux, méprisable, ignoble, sacrilège (religious), impie (religious)
  • (exceedingly bad or ugly): laid, détestable, exécrable, horrible

Derived terms

  • abominable homme des neiges
  • abominablement

Further reading

  • “abominable” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Alternative forms

  • abominábel

Etymology

From Late Latin ab?min?bilis.

Adjective

abominable m or f (plural abominables)

  1. abominable

Related terms

  • abominación
  • abominar

Further reading

  • “abominable” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Middle English

Adjective

abominable

  1. Alternative form of abhomynable

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ab?m??n??bl?/
  • Rhymes: -??bl?
  • Hyphenation: a?bo?mi?na?ble

Adjective

abominable

  1. definite singular of abominabel
  2. plural of abominabel

Spanish

Etymology

From Late Latin ab?min?bilis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /abomi?nable/, [a.??o.mi?na.??le]

Adjective

abominable (plural abominables)

  1. abominable

Derived terms

Related terms

  • abominar
  • abominado

Further reading

  • “abominable” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

abominable From the web:

  • what abominable means
  • what abominable character am i
  • what abominable snowman meaning
  • what's abominable snowman in spanish
  • abominable what a beautiful life
  • abominable what city
  • abominable what are you doing
  • abominable what country

abominable in Examples From Wordnik

  • But when poverty forced his family to move to a grim Paris suburb, he awoke suddenly to what he called the abominable treatment meted out to all the potential "myselves" who had been conditioned to become subcitizens good only to keep working to pay for the retirements of the "real" French when the French age pyramid gets thin at the base.
  • Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday prayed at the memorial to victims of a 1944 massacre that was one of the worst atrocities by German occupiers in Italy during World War II and denounced what he called the "abominable" legacy of violence unleashed during war.
  • Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday prayed at the memorial to victims of a 1944 massacre that was one of the worst atrocities by German occupiers in Italy during World War II and denounced what he called the "abominable" legacy of violence unleashed during war.
  • Pope visits memorial to Nazi victims in Rome Pope Benedict XVI on Sunday prayed at the memorial to victims of a 1944 massacre that was one of the worst atrocities by German occupiers in Italy during World War II and denounced what he called the "abominable" legacy of violence unleashed during war.
  • His offenses against the Peronistas up to that time had apparently consisted of little more than adding his signature to pro-democratic petitions, but shortly after his resignation he addressed the Argentine Society of Letters saying, in his characteristic style, “Dictatorships foster oppression, dictatorships foster servitude, dictatorships foster cruelty; more abominable is the fact that they foster idiocy.”
  • Israel literally went beyond the heathen in abominable idolatries.
  • The word abominable has appeared in 3 Times articles over the past year, including in an April 29, 2009 music review of The Grateful Dead titled
  • To conclude, this sole vice, in my opinion, spoiled in him the most rich and beautiful nature that ever was, and has rendered his name abominable to all good men, in that he would erect his glory upon the ruins of his country and the subversion of the greatest and most flourishing republic the world shall ever see.
  • To conclude, this sole vice, in my opinion, spoiled in him the most rich and beautiful nature that ever was, and has rendered his name abominable to all good men, in that he would erect his glory upon the ruins of his country and the subversion of the greatest and most flourishing republic the world shall ever see.
  • * The "Saw" movies none of which I've seen, but I understand some of the premises are based on the notion of abominable choice sets: do the helpless victims cut-out one of their eyes to retrieve a key to unlock the nail-traps that will impale their skulls within 60 seconds - or instead accept their gory death?


disquieting

English

Etymology

disquiet +? -ing.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: dis?quiet?ing

Adjective

disquieting (comparative more disquieting, superlative most disquieting)

  1. Causing mental trouble or anguish; upsetting; making uneasy.

Translations

Verb

disquieting

  1. present participle of disquiet.

Noun

disquieting (plural disquietings)

  1. The act by which someone or something is disquieted.
    • 1640, Edward Reynolds, A treatise of the passions and faculties of the soule of man
      Thus we see the intuition of divine truth in minds of defiled affections, worketh not that sweet effect which is natural unto it to produce; but doubtings, terrors, and disquietings of conscience []

Translations

disquieting From the web:

  • disquieting meaning
  • disquieting what does it mean
  • what does disquieting mean in the bible
  • what does disquieting mean in english
  • what do disquieting mean
  • what does disquieting news mean
  • what does disquieting mean in the dictionary
  • what is disquieting suggestion

disquieting in Examples From Wordnik

  • What makes these strange smiles of Spitzer's so disquieting is the realization that they're glimpses of Irwin -- Spitzer's raging inner prosecutor -- taking fiendish pleasure in having chopped down another case of hubris.
  • Intensive learning, or taking on a brand new skill are often arduous experiences because they require us to give up a measure of our belonging and to exist in disquieting limbo while we master the skill or discipline in question.
  • Perhaps even more disquieting is some evidence just now being published that suggests that the holding of a good job at a good salary is correlated much more with academic credentials than with ability and performance.
  • Amid a great deal of confusion and a great deal of debate and discussion this new baby is born under certain disquieting circumstances but we will have two Provinces more.
  • Reports on state of sugar industry 'disquieting' -
  • Nobel Prize–winning physiologist, Charles Richet, a nonbeliever in postmortem survival, said this about deathbed visions: “Among all the facts adduced to prove survival, these seem to me to be the most disquieting, that is, from a materialistic point of view.”
  • Nobel Prize–winning physiologist, Charles Richet, a nonbeliever in postmortem survival, said this about deathbed visions: “Among all the facts adduced to prove survival, these seem to me to be the most disquieting, that is, from a materialistic point of view.”
  • Nobel Prize–winning physiologist, Charles Richet, a nonbeliever in postmortem survival, said this about deathbed visions: “Among all the facts adduced to prove survival, these seem to me to be the most disquieting, that is, from a materialistic point of view.”
  • And the clever clerk -- with the two brothers in the bazaar -- had unearthed quite a bit of disquieting news about that reception -- disquieting, that is, to one with secret fears.
  • At the center of the museum, the Hall of Witness, near where the assailant shot his victim, is framed by angular steel trusses, brick walls and a fissure in the floor to recall the disquieting, industrial architecture of concentration camps.

you may also like

+1
Share
Pin
Like
Send
Share